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November 21, 2011

Vol. 27 , No. 06   

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Remarks by Condoleezza Rice
CONDOLEEZZA RICE
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2011

Condoleezza Rice is currently a professor of political economy in the Graduate School of Business; the Thomas and Barbara Stephenson Senior Fellow on Public Policy at the Hoover Institution and a professor of political science at Stanford University. She is also a founding partner of The Rice Hadley Group. From January 2005-2009, Rice served as the 66th Secretary of State of the United States, the second woman and first African American woman to hold the post. Rice also served as President George W. Bush’s Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs (National Security Advisor) from January 2001-2005, the first woman to hold the position. Rice served as Stanford University’s Provost from 1993-1999, during which she was the institution’s chief budget and academic officer. As Provost, she was responsible for a $1.5 billion annual budget and the academic program involving 1,400 faculty members and 14,000 students. As professor of political science, Rice has been on the Stanford faculty since 1981 and has won two of the highest teaching honors — the 1984 Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching and the 1993 School of Humanities and Sciences Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching.

She has authored and co-authored numerous books, including: bestseller Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family (2010); Germany Unified and Europe Transformed: A Study in Statecraft (1995) with Philip Zelikow; The Gorbachev Era (1986) with Alexander Dallin; Uncertain Allegiance: The Soviet Union and the Czechoslovak Army (1984). Her most recent book, No Higher Honor: A Memoir of My Years in Washington, will be released in November 2011.

In 1991, Rice co-founded the Center for a New Generation, an innovative, after-school academic enrichment program for students in East Palo Alto and East Menlo Park, California. In 1996, CNG merged with the Boys and Girls Club of the Peninsula (an affiliate club of the Boys and Girls Club of America) of which she remains actively involved in today. In addition, she is a member of the boards of the Commonwealth Club, the Aspen Institute, and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

Rice’s visit to Claremont McKenna College is made possible through the support of the Res Publica Society, Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum, Berger Institute for Work, Family and Children, Keck Center for International Strategic Studies, Kravis Leadership Institute, Lowe Institute of Political Economy, and Salvatori Center for the Study of Individual Freedom.




January 23, 2012

Vol. 27 , No. 07   

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Why Capitalism?
ALLAN MELTZER
MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012
LUNCHEON 11:30 a.m.; LECTURE 12:00 p.m.

Allan H. Meltzer is one of the world's foremost authorities on the history of the U.S. Federal Reserve. From 1973 to 1999, he served as the chair of the Shadow Open Market Committee, a group of economists that critiqued the decisions of the Fed's Open Market Committee. He served on the Council of Economic Advisers for Presidents Kennedy and Reagan. In 2001, he published the first of a two volume history of the Federal Reserve and is completing work on the second volume. He chaired the International Financial Institution Advisory Committee which in 2003 recommended reforms at the International Monetary Fund and World Bank.

A distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Allan H. Meltzer University Professor of Political Economy at the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University, Professor Meltzer has been awarded the Truman Medal for Economic Policy. Established in 2005, the medal recognizes economists who have made extraordinary contributions to the formation of economic policy. The award went to Alan Greenspan in 2005, George P. Shultz in 2007, and Paul Volker in 2009. The Truman Medal honors Meltzer’s pioneering academic work in monetary policy, political theory, and economic history; his many practical contributions to improved economic policy; and his unswerving devotion to capitalism and individual liberty.

Dr. Meltzer’s Athenaeum lecture is sponsored by the Dean of the Faculty at Claremont McKenna College.




February 6, 2012

Vol. 27 , No. 08   

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Whither Food Security—The Food Insecure Poor: What Future Awaits Them?
BARRY RILEY
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2012

Barry Riley is a visiting scholar in the Center on Food Security and the Environment at the Freeman Spogli Institute (FSI) for International Studies at Stanford University. Previously he worked for more than 20 years with The U.S. Agency for International Development, mostly in Eastern and Northeastern Africa. While serving in that region he witnessed firsthand the devastating 1973 drought in Ethiopia and, ten years later, the so-called "drought of the Century" in Kenya where he was appointed by the U.S. Ambassador to coordinate the U.S. response to that event. Subsequently, he served as Director of USAID's Office of Policy, Management and Evaluation dealing with food aid and voluntary assistance globally. He moved to the World Bank in the late 1980s, serving as a Sr. Projects Officer in the Africa Region's Food Security Unit - focused on food security analysis, policy and evaluation for countries in Southern Africa.


From 1993-2009 he was a private consultant on issues of food security, food policy and food aid and undertook more than 50 consultancies for the World Bank, several U.N. agencies and numerous non-governmental organizations and consulting firms. In recent years, he has led or participated in a number of evaluations for the World Food Program, most often in Ethiopia. These have focused on issues of more relevant and timely early warning, more programmatically useful vulnerability assessments, and improving the sustained effectiveness of food aid used in support of longer term food security objectives.


While at FSI he is undertaking to encapsulate these experiences in a book on U.S. Food Aid and its relationships with food security. He is the co-author of The Development Effectiveness of Food Aid- Does Tying Matter? (2006) for OECD/DAC and of numerous reports to WFP, the World Bank and the U.S. government on food aid and food security.


Barry Riley’s visit to campus is sponsored by the Center for Human Rights Leadership at CMC.




February 6, 2012

Vol. 27 , No. 08   

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ATHENAEUM ETIQUETTE

  • The Athenaeum serves as a gathering place where ideas, inquiry, and fellowship bring students, faculty, staff, other scholars, and nationally prominent speakers together.


  • Attendance at any event may be limited to persons associated with CMC, to the people who signed up for the dinner, or to the maximum number of people allowed by fire regulations.


  • On some occasions the speaker may address the group in another forum or the College may set up a video feed to handle an overflow crowd. All programs at the Athenaeum are filmed. Individuals attending should understand that their image might appear on the videotape.


  • House rules and common courtesy prohibit disruptive actions inside the building during an Athenaeum sponsored program.


  • Time allowing, there will be a period set aside for questions. Students will have priority during this portion of the program.


  • Guests are expected to dress appropriately in all dining rooms. Shorts, jeans, and t-shirts are not acceptable at dinner; more casual attire is acceptable for lunch and tea. No bare feet at any time.





February 20, 2012

Vol. 27 , No. 09   

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ATHENAEUM ETIQUETTE

  • The Athenaeum serves as a gathering place where ideas, inquiry, and fellowship bring students, faculty, staff, other scholars, and nationally prominent speakers together.


  • Attendance at any event may be limited to persons associated with CMC, to the people who signed up for the dinner, or to the maximum number of people allowed by fire regulations.


  • On some occasions the speaker may address the group in another forum or the College may set up a video feed to handle an overflow crowd. All programs at the Athenaeum are filmed. Individuals attending should understand that their image might appear on the videotape.


  • House rules and common courtesy prohibit disruptive actions inside the building during an Athenaeum sponsored program.


  • Time allowing, there will be a period set aside for questions. Students will have priority during this portion of the program.


  • Guests are expected to dress appropriately in all dining rooms. Shorts, jeans, and t-shirts are not acceptable at dinner; more casual attire is acceptable for lunch and tea. No bare feet at any time.





February 20, 2012

Vol. 27 , No. 09   

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India: A Revolution of Rising Expectations
ASEEMA SINHA
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2012

Dr. Aseema Sinha is the first holder of the Wagener Family Associate Professor of Comparative Politics and George R. Roberts Fellow. This evening’s lecture marks Professor Sinha’s ceremonial installation as the inaugural holder of the chaired professorship established in honor of the Wagener family.

Professor Sinha’s presentation will focus on the emerging dilemmas in India: the combination of growth with rising inequalities, the pursuit of a unique model of transition that combines a second democratic revolution and inclusive growth with a market economy, and the challenges of India’s new-found status at the global level for some of India’s domestic contradictions.

Prior to joining the faculty at Claremont McKenna College, Professor Sinha served on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and was a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C. Her research interests relate to the political economy of India and India-China comparisons.


At CMC, she teaches courses on South Asia, Social Movements, Globalization and Developing Countries, and Comparative Politics. She is the author of the prize-winning book, The Regional Roots of Developmental Politics in India: A Divided Leviathan (Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2005).



Fuel It Don't Fool It: Treat Your Body Right
LESLIE BONCI
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2011
LUNCHEON 11:30 a.m.; LECTURE 12:00 p.m.

Leslie J. Bonci, MPH, RD, CSSD, LDN, one of the country’s most recognized sports dietitians, is the director of sports medicine nutrition for the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the Center for Sports Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). She serves as the sports dietitian for the University of Pittsburgh’s department of athletics, and is a nutrition consultant for the Pittsburgh Steelers, Pittsburgh Penguins, Pittsburgh Pirates, Toronto Blue Jays, and the Milwaukee Brewers. In addition, she is the company nutritionist for the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre and a sports nutrition consultant to numerous high schools and universities. Leslie is a consultant to the NCAA and is also a member of the United States Olympic Committee sports nutrition network and has worked with Bryan Clay, Garrett Weber-Gale and Tara Lipinksi.

A popular former national media spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association for eight years, Bonci is a frequent guest on local and national TV news programs, a commonly-quoted nutrition expert in newspapers and magazines nationwide, and serves on the editorial advisory board of Fitness magazine and the California Dried Plum Board. She has her own weekly segment, “The Winning Plate” on Pittsburgh’s KDKA-TV’s Pittsburgh Today Live and writes a weekly blog for Runners World; Ask the Sports Dietitian. She has done work for Campbell’s, HJ Heinz, Gatorade, Kelloggs, Kraft, and The National Dairy Council among others. Her expertise in the areas of sports nutrition, weight management, eating disorders and digestive health resulted in three book publications: Total Fitness for Women, which she co-authored, and the American Dietetic Association Guide to Better Digestion and Sport Nutrition for Coaches, both of which she was the sole author. She is the co-author of Run Your Butt Off and The Active Calorie Diet (2011 publications). An avid long-distance runner, she writes a weekly blog for Runners World; “Ask the Sports Dietitian”. Leslie has written chapters in several sports medicine textbooks and also sits on the advisory board of the Journal of Athletic Training.

Bonci is a registered dietitian and board certified specialist in sports dietetics and a Pennsylvania licensed dietitian/nutritionist with a Bachelor of Science degree in biopsychology from Vassar College and a master’s degree in public health from the University of Pittsburgh. She is currently an adjunct assistant instructor in pediatric dentistry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine and also serves on the faculty of Pitt’s sports medicine fellowship training program.


Welcome to the Class of 2015

Where There is Health; There is Hope
DEOGRATIAS NIYIZONKIZA
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2011

The story of Deogratias Niyizonkiza can be found in Strength in What Remains (2009), the critically acclaimed book by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tracy Kidder, and the reading book for the CMC Class of 2015.

After surviving a massacre at the Burundian hospital where he was a third-year medical school intern, Deogratias Niyizonkiza “Deo” fled to New York where he arrived in 1994, penniless and without one word of English. Despite the hurdles -- low-paying work as a grocery store delivery boy, illness and homelessness -- with help from new friends he eventually enrolled in Columbia University where he studied biochemistry and philosophy.

After graduating from Columbia, Deo entered Harvard University's School of Public Health, where he met and worked with Dr. Paul Farmer, co-founder of Partners In Health (PIH). Deo later took a hiatus from Dartmouth Medical School to found Village Health Works (www.villagehealthworks.org), a Burundi-based organization founded on the humane principle that all people, including those most impoverished, deserve access to quality healthcare in a dignified environment. Village Health Works’ mission is to create healthy, self-sufficient populations by providing excellent healthcare while addressing the root causes of illness and disease. Since opening its clinic doors in December 2007, the clinic in rural Burundi has seen more than 55,000 individual patients, the majority of whom are women and their children.

We have built a fully-functioning health center complex, which includes an in-patient, outpatient and malnutrition ward (the only center with capacity to treat malnutrition in Southern Burundi); community center; residence; solar farm; and agriculture & food security demonstration and training gardens. Our staff is entirely Burundian, except for our Haitian medical director and includes 50 trained community health workers. We are not just building a clinic, Deo says. We are building peace.

Members of the Freshmen Class are automatically signed up for this dinner, so please contact the Athenaeum (ext. 18244) to cancel if you are unable to attend. Overflow seating will be provided in McKenna Auditorium. Deogratias Niyizonkiza’s visit to campus is sponsored by the office of the President, the Dean of Students, and the Athenaeum.




Ludwig van Beethoven: Sonata No. 2 in C Minor, Op. 30 for Piano and Violin
Antonin Dvorak: Romance for Violin and Piano, Op. 11
Johannes Brahms: Sonata No. 1 in G Major for Violin and Piano, Op. 78
DEBORAH BUCK, violin
ROBERT THIES, piano
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2011

Deborah Buck and Robert Edward Thies have graced the Athenaeum stage in the past, both in solo recitals and in chamber ensembles. Each time the response has been an overwhelming, “When will they return?” So, don’t miss a rare and wonderful opportunity to hear these two superb musicians in concert once again.

Described by Strad magazine as “Particularly impressive for her surpassing degree of imagination and vibrant sound,” violinist Deborah Buck has built a strong musical career as chamber musician, concertmaster, and soloist. She enjoys a versatile musical life as the first violinist of the LARK Quartet and the tenured Concertmaster of the Brooklyn Philharmonic. Ms. Buck is also a frequent concerto soloist, appearing with the Little Orchestra Society at Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center, Brooklyn Philharmonic, West Virginia Symphony, Santa Cecelia Chamber Orchestra in Los Angeles, and the Philadelphia Virtuosi Chamber Orchestra. As recitalist, Buck has performed at the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. and over the airways via broadcasts of the Dame Myra Hess Series in Chicago for WFMT and “Sunday’s Live” in Los Angeles for KKGO.

The recipient of many honors and awards, her violin solos for television helped breathe life back into the re-mastered American Silent Film classic, “The Scarlet Letter,” (1926) (Turner Classic Movies). Ms. Buck was educated at the Juilliard School as a Starling Scholar of Dorothy DeLay and the University of Southern California as a student of Robert Lipsett where she was the recipient of the Jascha Heifetz Violin Prize. In 2010, Ms. Buck was named Executive Director of the Kinhaven Music School where she has served on the summer faculty in Weston, Vermont for the past ten years. Ms. Buck performs on a violin by Vincenzo Postiglione graciously on loan by Ray and Marcia Corwin.

CMC is also privileged to welcome back to the Athenaeum Los Angeles-based pianist Robert Edward Thies. Thies was catapulted into the international spotlight in 1995 by winning the top prize at the Second International Profokiev Competition, a renowned piano contest held in St. Petersburg, Russia. Thies’ victory was the first by an American in any Russian piano competition since 1958 — an impressive accomplishment for any artist, let alone one who was in his mid-20’s at the time. Since that time, Thies has garnered a reputation as a consummate, graceful musician with a keen poetic sense and a remarkably diverse repertoire.

Thies studied under Robert Turner and Daniel Pollock, who were themselves students of the great Russian masters Madame Rosina and Josef Lhevinne. Thies has enjoyed a diverse musical career as an orchestral soloist, recitalist, and chamber musician. He has appeared with such orchestras as the Saint Petersburg Philharmonic, Mexico City Philharmonic, the National Symphony of Mexico, Auckland Philharmonia (New Zealand), and the Naples Philharmonic. In 2001, Thies completed a recital tour of 40 American cities, and he has collaborated with numerous chamber music ensembles. Thies’ location in Los Angeles has also made him a highly sought-after studio musician, and he has contributed to the film scores of such renowned composers as James Horner and Danny Elfman. His debut solo album, Live in Recital, was released in February 2006.



Piano Trio in B, Opus 8 (1854)
Johannes Brahms

Jamaica’s Songs (2000)
Music by Su Lian Tan
Text by Jamaica Kincaid
JAMAICA KINCAID
BRENDA PATTERSON, mezzo sporano
DONALD BERMAN, piano
DAVID BOWLIN, violin
DARRETT ADKINS, violoncello
MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2011

Jamaica’s Songs, commissioned by Middlebury College, was premiered in 2000 as part of the College’s bicentennial celebrations. Many musicians who have performed this cycle, as well as audience members, find a great solace in its expression. They have remarked, and often, that they find in these songs a channel for mixed emotions regarding their mothers, almost a way out of them. Strong negative feelings as well as longing and pure childlike love emanate from the text by Jamaica Kincaid. She wrote these songs for me the year her mother died and I felt it very necessary to help in her process of healing. My heart went out to her, as heard sometimes in the instrumental writing, this most gifted and powerful of writers. I have meandered in Jamaica’s garden in Vermont with pleasure, as I have found the courage to grow in her company.
-Su Lian Tan

As professor of music and former Chairman of the Music Department at Middlebury College, Su Lian Tan is known for her unique musical perspective and connecting to her students through the exploration of all kinds of music. In addition to teaching composition, she also coaches, conducts, and coordinates both student and professional concerts.

The second concert in the Athenaeum’s Fall 2011 Chamber Music series occurs Monday, October 10th. This concert will also provide a rare and wonderful opportunity to hear a recent work by composer Su Lian Tan, based on a text by Jamaica Kincaid.

Reservations for dinner are available and open to all. The concert begins at 6:45 p.m.

Piano trio in B , Opus 8 (1854)
Johannes Brahms

1. Allegro con brio
2. Scherzo
3. Adagio
4. Allegro

Donald Berman, piano
David Bowlin, violin
Darrett Adkins, violoncello

Jamaica’s Songs (2000)
Music by Su Lian Tan
Text by Jamaica Kincaid


1. mystery
2. angry . . .
3. grave
4. whisper
5. grazioso
6. lullaby
7. stern . . .
8. terms

Brenda Patterson, mezzo-soprano



A Gay Man's Journey Through Men's Major League Sports
RICK WELTS, JR.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2011

Five months ago, a private conversation between Rick Welts and his former boss made the front page of The New York Times. Then the President and Chief Executive Officer of the NBA’s Phoenix Suns, Welts became the highest-ranking executive in men’s sports – and perhaps professional sports’ highest-profile figure – to come out as gay. Now the President and Chief Operating Officer of the Golden State Warriors, he is one of the most respected business executives in the NBA.

Welts began his NBA career as a ball boy for his hometown Seattle SuperSonics in 1969. He soon became an assistant trainer for the team and after college became the assistant director of public relations. He headed Seattle’s public relations during back-to-back appearances in the NBA Finals in 1978 and 1979, the latter becoming Seattle’s only NBA championship.

In 1982 Welts joined the National Basketball Association’s league offices as Director of National Promotions. He later became Vice President for Communications and eventually the league’s third-in-command as Executive Vice President, Chief Marketing Officer, and President of NBA Properties. During his time with the NBA, Welts was a key part of the league’s revitalization and resurgence. In 1984, Welts created the NBA All-Star Weekend, which was quickly replicated across professional sports. In 1992, he ran the marketing for USA Basketball’s Olympic Dream Team; in 1996 he helped launch the WNBA.

Welts’s talk is a part of the Athenaeum’s ongoing series “Shifting Perceptions: Celebrating the Spectrum of Leadership,” which aims to foster a greater sense of inclusivity and community at CMC by celebrating the bold leadership of women, gay men, and lesbians. The series is sponsored by nine different offices and organizations on campus, including the Athenaeum, the President’s Office, Dean of Students, and the Dean of the Faculty.


Slavery/Women/Writing: 21 Refracted Portraits Based on Writings of Eduardo Galeano
THOMAS LEABHART, director
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2011

In January, Pomona College Theatre Professor Thomas Leabhart found a copy of Eduardo Galeano’s book, Mirrors, in an airport bookstore in India. A long-time admirer of Galeano’s writing, he happily devoured this most recent work during the subsequent long flight, and upon arrival in Claremont knew he’d like to spend more time with it. Scheduled to teach a course entitled Collective Creation in the fall semester, he found the material perfect for eventual transformation into performance. He obtained permission from Galeano’s North American literary agent, and he and 14 eager students and two guest artists set to work. The performance “Slavery/Women/Writing: 21 Refracted Portraits” is the result. While the students selected texts, decided among themselves who would perform which parts, and improvised and finally set blocking, Leabhart provided a framework within which these elements achieve coherence, serving as acting coach, editor and “outside eye.” This is a presentation for theatre lovers, admirers of Galeano’s deconstructed views of history, and anyone who likes to challenge preconceived notions about history and performance.



Why Capitalism?
ALLAN MELTZER
MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012
LUNCHEON 11:30 a.m.; LECTURE 12:00 p.m.

Allan H. Meltzer is one of the world's foremost authorities on the history of the U.S. Federal Reserve. From 1973 to 1999, he served as the chair of the Shadow Open Market Committee, a group of economists that critiqued the decisions of the Fed's Open Market Committee. He served on the Council of Economic Advisers for Presidents Kennedy and Reagan. In 2001, he published the first of a two volume history of the Federal Reserve and is completing work on the second volume. He chaired the International Financial Institution Advisory Committee which in 2003 recommended reforms at the International Monetary Fund and World Bank.

A distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Allan H. Meltzer University Professor of Political Economy at the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University, Professor Meltzer has been awarded the Truman Medal for Economic Policy. Established in 2005, the medal recognizes economists who have made extraordinary contributions to the formation of economic policy. The award went to Alan Greenspan in 2005, George P. Shultz in 2007, and Paul Volker in 2009. The Truman Medal honors Meltzer’s pioneering academic work in monetary policy, political theory, and economic history; his many practical contributions to improved economic policy; and his unswerving devotion to capitalism and individual liberty.

Dr. Meltzer’s Athenaeum lecture is sponsored by the Dean of the Faculty at Claremont McKenna College.


Islamophobia, Discrimination, and National Security
AMEENA MIRZA QAZI
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012

In the past two months, a presidential candidate called for the profiling of Muslims, a Tennessee lawmaker told Muslims to "go back to where they came from," and a large home improvement store pulled ads from a television show ostensibly because it didn't portray Muslims in a negative light. How do these acts influence cases of discrimination? What have they to do with our nation’s national security policies?

Ameena Qazi is an attorney practicing civil rights law in Southern California. She holds a B.A. in Political Science from UCLA and a J.D. from Wayne State University School of Law, and is a member of the California State Bar.

Qazi has worked with the Wayne State University Civil Rights Litigation and Disability Rights Clinics, United Auto Workers, and the Council on American-Islamic Relations. She has been involved with research projects including the Pew Research Center's study "Muslim Americans: Middle Class and Mostly Mainstream." Her work focuses on First Amendment, equal protection, and due process issues.

Ameena Qazi’s Athenaeum presentation is jointly sponsored by the Claremont Colleges Muslim Student Association, the Center for Human Rights Leadership at CMC, and the Athenaeum.


A Conversation with a Leader
CONNIE DUCKWORTH P'12 P'14
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2012

In 2004, Connie Duckworth P’12 P’14 founded ARZU, Inc., a non-profit organization based on an innovative model of social entrepreneurship that helps Afghan women weavers and their families break the cycle of poverty by providing them steady income and access to education and healthcare by sourcing and selling the rugs they weave. She serves pro bono as chairman and chief executive officer. Duckworth is a retired partner and managing director of Goldman, Sachs, & Co., where she was named the first woman sales and trading partner in the firm’s history during her 20 year career from 1981-2001.


Duckworth is currently a trustee of Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company and a director of Russell Investment Group and Steelcase Inc. In her philanthropic work, Duckworth serves on the boards of The Wharton School in Philadelphia, the Interfaith Youth Core in Chicago and NorthShore University HealthSystem, in Evanston, Illinois, where she was the first woman to be named chairman of the board. She is a member of the U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council, a public/private partnership aligned with the U.S. State Department and past chair of the Committee of 200, the organization of leading women entrepreneurs and corporate business executives in the U.S. Duckworth also co-authored a primer on entrepreneurship entitled The Old Girls Network: Insider Advice for Women Building Businesses in a Man’s World (Basic Books 2003).


The recipient of numerous awards for leadership, advocacy, social impact, innovation and global presence, Duckworth was awarded the 2011 Wharton School Dean’s Medal, the school’s highest honor. In addition, she was named a 2008 Skoll Foundation honoree for Social Entrepreneurship. Duckworth holds an M.B.A. from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and a B.A. from the University of Texas.


Connie Duckworth’s visit to the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum is sponsored by the President’s Leaders Forum program.


Whither the Euro: Some Reflections from the History of Fiscal and Monetary Unions
MICHAEL BORDO
MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2012
LUNCHEON 11:30 a.m.; LECTURE 12:00 p.m.

Michael D. Bordo is Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for Monetary and Financial History at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey. He has held previous academic positions at the University of South Carolina and Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. He has been a visiting Professor at the University of California Los Angeles, Carnegie Mellon University, Princeton University, Harvard University, Cambridge University where he was Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions, and a Visiting Scholar at the IMF, Federal Reserve Banks of St. Louis and Cleveland, the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, the Bank of Canada, the Bank of England and the Bank for International Settlement. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He is also a member of the Shadow Open Market Committee. He has a B.A. degree from McGill University, a M.Sc.(Econ) from the London School of Economics and he received his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1972. He has published many articles in leading journals and ten books in monetary economics and monetary history. He is editor of a series of books for Cambridge University Press: Studies in Macroeconomic History (1993).

Recent publications include: with Barry Eichengreen, A Retrospective on the Bretton Woods International Monetary System (University of Chicago Press, 1993); with Claudia Goldin and Eugene White, The Defining Moment: The Great Depression and the American Economy in the Twentieth Century, (University of Chicago Press, 1998); Essays on the Gold Standard and Related Regimes, (Cambridge University Press, 1999); with Alan Taylor and Jeffery Williamson, Globalization in Historical Perspective, (University of Chicago Press, 2003).

Professor Bordo is a guest of the Lowe Center for Political Economy.



The Divas Are Back!!

Mariachi Divas: A Musical Celebration in Honor of Cesar Chavez
CINDY SHEA, trumpet, founding director
GINA DURAN, trumpet
ARIANA MEJIA, flute, vocals
SANDIE CASTANEDA, congas, percussion
DANIELA GUTIERREZ, guitarron
WENDY ALARCON, vihuela
MELINDA SALCIDO, guitar, vocals
KARINA ZURITA, guitar, vocals
ANGEL GARCIA, violin, vocals
CATHY BAEZA, violin
DIANA BENITEZ, violin
STEPHANIE MARTINEZ, violin, vocals
VALERIE CARLOS, guitar, vocals
RUBY TORRES, violin
MONDAY, MARCH 26, 2012

In a profession traditionally dominated by men, the Mariachi Divas have made big waves on the national and international music scene. This all female sensation swept the Athenaeum to its feet with its first performance in March 2004. This will be their 8th performance at CMC and it is difficult to imagine celebrating Cesar Chavez without the Divas.

Directed and founded by trumpet player Cindy Shea in 1999, Mariachi Divas is a unique, multi-cultural, all female ensemble. Imbued with the true flavor of Los Angeles the Divas have been represented by women of Mexican, Cuban, Samoan, Argentinean, Colombian, Panamanian, Puerto Rican, Swiss, Japanese, Honduran, Salvadorian, Peruvian, Tongan and Anglo descents. Cindy Shea states, "Music is a way of uniting our cultural backgrounds”. In 2009, Mariachi Divas won the Grammy Award for Best Regional Mexican Album of the year for their 2008 release, “Canciones De Amor.” This marked the first time in the history of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences that an all-female mariachi group had been a nominee, or of course, a winner. All seven of their CDs are distributed nationally through Shea Records and East Side Records.

The Divas were invited to perform at the inaugurations of Los Angeles mayor, Antonio R. Villaraigosa and California governor, Arnold Schwarzenegger. They also performed live on C-SPAN for then Senator Hillary Clinton at her Los Angeles presidential campaign rally in 2008. Providing sound tracks for films as well as appearing as actors, since September 2003, they have been the official mariachis of Disney in Anaheim, performing 7 days a week for audiences of all ages.

CMC is fortunate that the Divas continue to make time to perform for their many fans in the Claremont community. This concert is jointly sponsored by the Center for Chicano/Latino Affairs, Maria Torres Dean.


UNDER THE LIGHTS presents

Dinner Theater
FINNEGAN'S FAREWELL by Kevin Alexander
MONDAY, APRIL 9 - WEDNESDAY APRIL 11, 2012
PERFORMANCE BEGINS:
SERVICE: 5:30 p.m. Mary Pickford Auditorium
DINNER 6:00 p.m.

The Finnegan family has lost their patriarch, Paddy, shortly after he won big at the slot machines in Atlantic City. You are cordially invited to his wake. Starting with a brief service in the local Chapel (Pickford Auditorium), then moving onto Vinnie's (the Ath) for dinner and dancing, we will honor Paddy by sharing kind words and drinking 'til singing seems appropriate. Things are never dull when you're with the Finnegans, so don't be surprised if there are some unexpected twists and turns throughout the evening! ;)


The United States, Egypt, and The New ‘New Middle East’
STEVEN A. COOK
MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012

Steven A. Cook is the Hasib J. Sabbagh senior fellow for Middle Eastern studies at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). Dr. Cook is an expert on Arab and Turkish politics, as well as U.S. Middle East policy. He is the author of The Struggle for Egypt: From Nasser to Tahrir Square (Oxford University Press, Fall 2011), where he explores Egypt’s history, why the revolution occurred, and where the country might be headed next. Dr. Cook is also the author of Ruling But Not Governing: The Military and Political Development in Egypt, Algeria, and Turkey (John Hopkins press, 2007).

Dr. Cook has published widely in a variety of foreign policy journals, opinion magazines, and newspapers including Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Wall Street Journal, Journal of Democracy, Weekly Standard, Slate, New Republic Online, New York Times, Washington Post, Financial Times, International Herald Tribune, and Survival. He is also a frequent commentator on radio and television. Dr Cook currently writes the CFR blog, “From the Potomac to the Euphrates.”

Prior to joining CFR, Dr. Cook was a research fellow at the Brookings Institution (2001–2002) and a Soref research fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy (1995–96). He holds a B.A. in international studies from Vassar College, an M.A. in international relations from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and both an M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Cook speaks Arabic, Turkish, and reads French.


Unearthing the Visions of a Master: The Story and Legacy of Ramanujan
KEN ONO
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2012

The legend of Ramanujan is one of the most romantic stories in the modern history of athematics. It is the story of an untrained mathematician, from south India, who brilliantly discovered tantalizing examples of phenomena well before their time. Indeed, the legacy of Ramanujan's work (as a whole) is well documented and includes direct connections to some of the deepest results in modern number theory such as the proof of the Weil Conjectures and the proof of Fermat's Last Theorem. However, one final problem remained, the enigma of the functions which Ramanujan discovered on his death bed. Here we tell the story of Ramanujan and this final mystery.


Ken Ono, the Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Mathematics at Emory University, received his Ph.D from UCLA in 1993. Upon graduation, he held positions at the University of Georgia, the University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign), the Institute of Advanced Studies, and Penn State University, where he was named the Louis P. Martarano Professor in 1999. From 2000-2011 he was the Manasse Professor of Letters and Science and the Hilldale Professor of Mathematics at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He has authored over 130 research papers in number theory. He has advised 17 doctoral students to date and sits on the editorial boards of eleven journals including the Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society, as the managing editor, and the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society. He has received numerous awards and honors, including a Sloan Fellowship, a Presidential Early Career Award, a Packard Fellowship, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is also well known as a distinguished mentor and teacher. He twice won the University of Wisconsin Residence Halls "Favorite Instructor Award", and in 2005 he won the NSF Director's Distinguished Teaching Scholar Award.