September 15, 85

Vol. 01 , No. 02   



THE DIRECTOR'S CORNER
JOHN ROTH

Forty years ago Hiroshima and Nagasaki became nuclear wastelands. Once Asia's military giant, a defeated Japan faced American occupation. It was hardly conceivable that a generation later Japanese entrepreneurship would rival the United States'. Phoenix-like, the Japanese economy rose from the ashes of World War II. If Americans once sneered at the label "Made in Japan," they now find excellent quality in products from Sony, Nissan, and other Japanese firms. This July Japan posted a record $3.7-billion monthly trade surplus with the United States. Such facts create issues that affect us all.

Focused on those concerns, "Entrepreneurship: The Japanese-American Connection" is the 1985 fall symposium at the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum. Experts from business, government, and the academy-including Chalmers Johnson, Taizo Watanabe, Glen Fukashima, and Peter Drucker-will explore Japanese-American economic relationships in discussions beginning Monday evening, September 30, and concluding Wednesday evening, October 2.

Pre-symposium festivities on Thursday, September 26, include a luncheon discussion with CMC's John Zinda, who will describe his recent enterprising activities in promoting American football in Japan. That night the Athenaeum hosts "A Japanese Evening," complete with Japanese food and entertainment.

All who wish to attend the symposium's luncheon or dinner events must make reservations with the Athenaeum secretary at least three days in advance. Student meal card numbers are required. Students, faculty, staff., trustees, and other specially invited persons dine as the Athenaeum's guests. As seating permits, reservations from the public-$3.00 for lunch and $5.00 for dinner, payable in advance by check to The Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum-are welcome, too. To make reservations by telephone, use x8244 on campus. From off campus, dial (714) 621-8244.




THE FELLOWS' TURN
LAURA MAY

Each fortnight the 1985-86 Athenaeum student fellows, Cindy Wayne and I, will share our ideas and concerns in this column. My initial wish is to reiterate that the Athenaeum will continue to provide social events to amuse, relax, and satisfy you.

Five major feasts are in the making. Two merit early notice. On Thursday, September 26, an evening of Japanese cuisine and entertainment precedes the symposium on "Entrepreneurship: The JapaneseAmerican Connection." Besides Japanese delicacies and a martial arts demonstration, a drumming group, Kinnara Taiko, will perform their unique mixture of drumming and dance. One night later the ambience becomes European as Herr Bauer hosts the third annual "Oktoberfest." After the last resounding chorus of "In Munchen steht ein Hofbrauhaus," you'll leave this feast exhausted from dancing and joyously stuffed.

Among the regularly scheduled events, try "The Wednesday Lunch"-no advance reservations required. Students, faculty, and administrators are encouraged to invite each other for food and discussion "on the house" Save the first Sunday morning of each month to enjoy Harald Bauer's famous brunch. And don't overlook afternoon tea, 3:00-4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, in the Athenaeum library.

Finally, an old CMC custom-"The Game of the Week"-will be revived. Beginning September 27, and each Friday noon thereafter during the football season, Coach John Zinda will bring expertise, wit, and film to preview upcoming Stag gridiron contests and assess games past. Another fascinating occasion with Coach Zinda will occur on Thursday noon, September 26, when he discusses his efforts to introduce American football into Japan.

Light-hearted fun, as well as serious thinking, always has its place at the Athenaeum. If there are things you want to happen here, please contact Cindy Wayne or me at x8244.




PRE-SYMPOSIUM EVENTS

Athletic Entrepreneurship: Promoting American Football in Japan
JOHN ZINDA
Thursday, September 26, 1985 11:00 a.m.

11:00 a.m. "Athletic Entrepreneurship: Promoting American Football in Japan," John D. Zinda, professor of physical education and director of athletics, Claremont McKenna College. (An Athenaeum luncheon at noon, with informal discussion, will follow Professor Zinda's address.)

5:30 p.m. "A Japanese Evening," a reception, dinner, and entertainment, all with distinctively Japanese flavors.




ENTREPRENEURSHIP: The Japanese-American Connection

The Japanese Economy: A Different Kind of Capitalism
CHALMERS JOHNSON
Monday, September 30, 1985

7:00 p.m."The Japanese Economy: A Different Kind of Capitalism." Chalmers Johnson, Walter and Elise Haas Professor of Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley. (An Athenaeum reception, 5:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 6:00 p.m., Will precede Professor Johnson's address.)

Japanese-American Economic Prospects: A Young Entrepreneur's Perspective
HOWARD JACOBSON '79
Tuesday, October 1, 1985 11:00 a.m.

11:00 a.m. "Japanese-American Economic Prospects: A Young Entrepreneur's Perspective," Howard E. Jacobson '79, executive vice president, Jacobson Trading Corporation.

Japanese-American Economic Prospects: A Diplomat's Perspective
TAIZO WATANABE
Tuesday, October 1, 1985 12:30 p.m.

12:30 p.m. "Japanese-American Economic Prospects: A Diplomat's Perspective," Taizo Watanabe, Consul General of Japan at Los Angeles. (An Athenaeum luncheon at noon will precede Mr. Watanabe's address.)

Doing Business with the Japanese
CHONG-WOOK CHUNG
GLEN FUKASHIMA
P. EDWARD HALEY
LEON HOLLERMAN
HOWARD JACOBSON '79
ARTHUR ROSENBAUM
Tuesday, October 1, 1985 3:00 p.m.

3:00 p.m. "Doing Business with the Japanese," an afternoon panel, featuring: Chong-Wook Chung, professor of international relations, Seoul National University, and research fellow, Keck Center for International Strategic Studies, Claremont McKenna College; Glen S. Fukashima, director for Japan, Office of the United States Trade Representative, Washington, D.C.; P. Edward Haley, professor of political science and director, Keck Center for International Strategic Studies, Claremont McKenna College; Leon Hollerman, professor of economics, Claremont McKenna College; Howard E. Jacobson '79, executive vice president, Jacobson Trading Corporation; Arthur L. Rosenbaum, associate professor of East Asian history, Claremont McKenna College.

An Economic Report From Tokyo and Washington
GLEN FUKASHIMA
Tuesday, October 1, 1985 7:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m."An Economic Report from Tokyo and Washington," Glen S. Fukashima, director for Japan, Office of the United States Trade Representative, Washington, D.C. (An Athenaeum reception, 5:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 6:00 p.m., will preceed Mr. Fukashima's address.)

Problems and Prospects for Japanese Business in the United States: A Bankers Perspective
HISAO KOBAYASHI
Wednesday, October 2, 1985 12:30 p.m.

12:30 p.m. "Problems and Prospects for Japanese Business in the United States: A Banker's Perspective," Hisao Kobayashi, president and chairman of the board, Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank of California. (An Athenaeum luncheon at noon will precede Mr. Kobayashi's address.)

Japanese Business in the United States
RICHARD FREY P'86
HISAO KOBAYASHI
TAKASHI MARUYAMA
HIROSHI NAKANO
Wednesday, October 2, 1985 3:00 p.m.

3:00 p.m. "Japanese Business in the United States," an afternoon panel, featuring: Richard D. Frey, first vice president, Security Pacific National Bank, Los Angeles; Hisao Kobayashi, president and chairman of the board, Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank of California; Takashi Maruyama, general manager, Industrial Bank of Japan, Los Angeles; Hiroshi Nakano, deputy director general, Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO), Los Angeles.

Innovation and Entrepreneurship: The Japanese-American Connection
PETER DRUCKER
Wednesday, October 2, 1985 7:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m. "Innovation and Entrepreneurship: The Japanese-American Connection," Peter F. Drucker, Marie Rankin Clarke Professor of Social Science, The Claremont Graduate School. (An Athenaeum reception, 5:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 6:00 p.m., will precede Professor Drucker's address.)




SYMPOSIUM PARTICIPANTS

Chong Wook Chung chairs the department of international relations in the College of Social Sciences at Seoul National University, Korea. During 1985-86 he is a research fellow at the Keck Center for International Strategic Studies, Claremont McKenna College.

Peter F. Drucker, the Marie Rankin Clarke Professor of Social Science at The Claremont Graduate School, is internationally acclaimed as a leading authority on industrial management. He is also a specialist on Japanese art and a novelist. The most recent of his influential books is Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

Richard D. Frey, the father of CMC senior Doug Frey, is first vice president of Security Pacific National Bank, Los Angeles. Mr. Frey has lived in Japan, and for the past fifteen years his banking expertise has focused on international activity in the Pacific region.

Glen S. Fukashima is the director for Japan of the Office of the United States Trade Representative in Washington, D.C. He has just returned from the latest round of U.S.-Japan trade negotiations in Tokyo.

P. Edward Haley, professor of political science and director of the Keck Center for International Strategic Studies at Claremont McKenna College, has traveled extensively in Southeast Asia. This August he was in Tokyo to participate in the Security Conference on Asia and the Pacific.

Leon Hollerman is the Dengler-Dykema Distinguished Service Professor at Claremont McKenna College. Among the most respected interpreters of the Japanese economy, Professor Hollerman has worked in Japan as a Fulbright Senior Research Scholar and as an American Council of Learned Societies Fellow in Asian Studies.

Howard E. Jacobson '79, a 1979 graduate of Claremont McKenna College, specializes in Japanese-American technology development. As executive vice president of the Jacobson Trading Corporation, he handles joint ventures in the computing field, robotics, and biotechnology.

Chalmers Johnson, the Walter and Elise Haas Professor of Asian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, is a member of the Council of Foreign Relations and the Japan-United States Friendship Commission. Professor Johnson writes extensively on the East Asian political economy, revolution, and social movements, including such books as Japan's Public Policy Companies and MITI and the Japanese Miracle.

Hisao Kobayashi holds degrees from Tokyo University and the School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Joining the Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank, Ltd. in 1959, he is presently the president and chairman of the board of the Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank of California.

Takashi Maruyama graduated in economics from Japan's Keio University and then joined the Industrial Bank of Japan in 1961. His international banking experience has taken him to Brazil, Iran, and Lebanon, as well as to- the United States, where he is the general manager of IBJ's Los Angeles agency.

Hiroshi Nakano took his degree in economics at Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan. Currently he is the deputy director general for the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO), Los Angeles. Mr. Nakano's many appearances before academic, civic, and business organizations throughout the western United States encourage American exports to Japan.

Arthur L. Rosenbaum, associate professor of East Asian history, chairs the history department at Claremont McKenna College. During his recent sabbatical, he did research in China.

Taizo Watanabe became consul general of Japan at Los Angeles in November 1984. A graduate of Tokyo University (Faculty of Law) and Yale University, Mr. Watanabe has held previous diplomatic posts in Kenya, the United Kingdom, and Thailand, as well as in the Japanese embassy in Washington, D.C.




THE FELLOWS' TURN
LAURA MAY '86

Each fortnight the 1985-86 Athenaeum student fellows, Cindy Wayne and I, will share our ideas and concerns in this column. My initial wish is to reiterate that the Athenaeum will continue to provide social events to amuse, relax, and satisfy you.

Five major feasts are in the making. Two merit early notice. On Thursday, September 26, an evening of Japanese cuisine and entertainment precedes the symposium on "Entrepreneurship: The JapaneseAmerican Connection." Besides Japanese delicacies and a martial arts demonstration, a drumming group, Kinnara Taiko, will perform their unique mixture of drumming and dance. One night later the ambience becomes European as Herr Bauer hosts the third annual "Oktoberfest." After the last resounding chorus of "In Munchen steht ein Hofbrauhaus," you'll leave this feast exhausted from dancing and joyously stuffed.

Among the regularly scheduled events, try "The Wednesday Lunch"-no advance reservations required. Students, faculty, and administrators are encouraged to invite each other for food and discussion "on the house" Save the first Sunday morning of each month to enjoy Harald Bauer's famous brunch. And don't overlook afternoon tea, 3:00-4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, in the Athenaeum library.

Finally, an old CMC custom-"The Game of the Week"-will be revived. Beginning September 27, and each Friday noon thereafter during the football season, Coach John Zinda will bring expertise, wit, and film to preview upcoming Stag gridiron contests and assess games past. Another fascinating occasion with Coach Zinda will occur on Thursday noon, September 26, when he discusses his efforts to introduce American football into Japan.

Light-hearted fun, as well as serious thinking, always has its place at the Athenaeum. If there are things you want to happen here, please contact Cindy Wayne or me at x8244.

CINDY WAYNE '87

This column lets Laura May and me express our views as Athenaeum student fellows. This month I want to use my. "Turn" to preview the Athenaeum's major programs for the second semester. Because in addition to James Burke, our calendar offers a packed schedule of attractive events. As you put them on your calendars and plan to attend them, please note that all who wish to join us for a luncheon or dinner in conjunction with the programs have to make reservations with the Athenaeum secretary at least 48 hours in advance. Meal card numbers from students are required. Students, faculty, staff, trustees, and other specially invited persons dine as the Athenaeum's guests. As seating permits, reservations from the public-normally $3.00 for lunch and $5.00 for dinner, payable in advance by check to the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum-are welcome, too.