November 15, 85

Vol. 01 , No. 06   



THE DIRECTOR'S CORNER
JOHN ROTH

William Trogdon is better known as William Least Heat Moon, author of the best-selling book Blue Highways: A Journey into America (1983). Persuaded that there was no quick fix for his "nearly desperate sense of isolation and a growing suspicion that I lived in an alien land," Moon chucked his Missouri routine one "last day of winter," took to the road in a van named "Ghost Dancing," and looped America "from the heartland out and around" in a search for clarity and renewal.

Moon treasures lines from a Navajo chant: "Remember what you have seen, because everything forgotten returns to the circling winds." His book takes that counsel to heart. Traveling the byways-the secondary roads that old maps used to mark in blue-Moon met people and saw places that gave him hope. His route took him through Nameless, Tennessee, to Dime Box, Texas, Depoe Bay in Oregon, and Othello, New Jersey.

Blue Highways missed Claremont, but on Tuesday, December 3, Bill Trogdon adds that stop to his itinerary when he arrives at the Athenaeum for conversations at lunch and dinner. Persons with a special interest in American literature, history, and politics-as well as anyone who simply enjoys being on the road-should find his visit inviting.

Journeys of other kinds precede Moon's Athenaeum stay. A symposium on "South Africa in Crisis" takes us into a troubled and troubling part of the contemporary world. Elie Wiesel's return to Claremont puts us in touch with the European past, one that leads him to affirm the call to remember that warning in Least Heat Moon's Navajo chant. These journeys evoke somber moods, but in the midst of them, it is good to remember, too, that we have reasons for Thanksgiving. Consult your calendars and plan to hear our autumn visitors. And make reservations for an Athenaeum Thanksgiving with us as you do so.




THE FELLOWS' TURN
LAURA MAY

Already it's my final "Turn" this semester, which suggests that our program for the fall is drawing to a close. Reflecting on the events of the semester, I think the Athenaeum has done well to provide a variety of subjects and speakers, from Robert Hilburn, discussing the present state of American "rock and roll," to the Japanese consul-general, commenting on Japanese-American trade. A Halloween feast and martial arts found places on a calendar also including computer art and cancer research. Our October symposium, "Child Abuse and Neglect," produced intriguing and disturbing discussions about the problems of being sensitive to an admittedly serious problem. January's Fortnightly outlines the programs for the spring semester. Meanwhile, if we are not providing something that interests or entertains you, please let us know.

Our final symposium for the semester, "South Africa in Crisis," shifts our attention to international affairs. Slated for November 18-19, it could hardly be more timely, as around the nation educational institutions and multinational corporations are beginning to re-evaluate the positive or negative ramifications of investments in South Africa. Many international experts believe that the apartheid crisis can no longer be resolved peacefully and that South Africa is, thus, on the verge of national revolution.

On Monday evening, November 18, Professor Edward A. Alpers, a noted historian from UCLA, provides background for the central question of the conference when he speaks on "South Africa in Crisis: How Should We Respond?" The next day, Claremont McKenna's Anton D. Lowenberg, visiting assistant professor of economics, discusses "The Political Economy of Apartheid." Finally, Professor Peter Duignan, senior fellow at Hoover Institution, assesses the internal politics of the country and its potential for change.

Following each lecture, panelists-including Dean E. McHenry, Jr., associate professor of government at CGS, and William F. Moses '84, a CMC Watson fellow, as well as the principal speakers-will comment and initiate discussion. Bill Moses will also be at tea in the Athenaeum library from 3:00-4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, November 19, to greet CMC friends and to share his experiences as a 1984-85 Watson fellow in South Africa. (This session promises to be lively, for in a recent issue of Profile, Bill wrote from Johannesburg that he was very opposed to the exploitation of blacks in South Africa and asked his CMC readership, "What have you done to overthrow the oppressive racist South African regime?") Join us for a look at this and other controversial questions regarding "South Africa in Crisis."




FEAST AND FESTIVAL

A Thanksgiving Celebration. You are invited to celebrate an early Thanksgiving with your CMC "family" at your Athenaeum "home-away-from-home," November 21. Sign-up coupons for this event and others can be found in this issue of The Fortnightly.

Sunday Brunch. This year the first Sunday in December occurs during Thanksgiving vacation. Therefore, the semester's final Sunday brunch is scheduled for November 24, a week earlier than usual.

Madrigal Feast. What could be a better way to condude the Athenaeum fall program series than the Madrigal feast? The six-course, medieval banquets will be held on December 5, 6, 7, 10, and 12. Throughout the celebrations The Claremont Colleges Choir, conducted by Michael Deane Lamkin, will entertain. There are still seats available for the last three nights of the feast. Stop by the Athenaeum and make your reservations before all nights are full.




SOUTH AFRICA IN CRISIS: A SYMPOSIUM

South Africa in Crisis: How Should We Respond?
EDWARD ALPERS
PETER DUIGNAN
ANTON LOWENBERG
WILLIAM MOSES '84
ARTHUR ROSENBAUM, moderator
Monday, November 18, 1985 7:00 p.m.

"South Africa in Crisis: How Should We Respond?" Edward A. Alpers professor of history, UCLA. Professor Alpers' address will be followed by a panel discussion featuring: Peter Duignan, senior fellow, Hoover Institution; Anton D. Lowenberg, visiting assistant professor of economics, Claremont McKenna College; William F. Moses '84, Watson fellow; with Professor Arthur L. Rosenbaum, Claremont McKenna College, moderator.

The Political Economy of Apartheid
ANTON LOWENBERG
PETER DUIGNAN
DEAN McHENRY, JR.
WILLIAM MOSES '84
MARIE-DENISE SHELTON, moderator
Tuesday, November 19, 1985
Bauer Lecture Hall 11:00 a.m.
"The Political Economy of Apartheid." Anton D. Lowenberg, visiting assistant professor of economics, Claremont McKenna College. Professor Lowenberg's address will be followed by a panel discussion featuring: Peter Duignan, senior fellow, Hoover Institution; Dean E. McHenry, Jr., associate professor of government, Claremont Graduate School; William F. Moses '84, Watson fellow; with Marie-Denise Shelton, associate professor of French, Claremont McKenna College, moderator.

Tuesday, November 19, 1985
Library of the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum 3:00-4:30 p.m. Informal tea-time discussion with William F. Moses '84, who has just returned from a year in South Africa as a Watson fellow.

South Africa: War Revolution, or Peace?
PETER DUIGNAN
ANTON LOWENBERG
DEAN McHENRY, JR.
WILLIAM MOSES '84
P. EDWARD HALEY, moderator
Tuesday, November 19, 1985 7:00 p.m.

"South Africa: War, Revolution, or Peace?" Peter Duignan, senior fellow, Hoover Institution. Professor Duignan's address will be followed by a panel discussion featuring: Anton D. Lowenberg, visiting assistant professor of economics, Claremont McKenna College; Dean E. McHenry, Jr., associate professor of government, Claremont Graduate School; William F. Moses '84, Watson fellow; with P. Edward Haley, director of the Keck Center for International Strategic Studies, Claremont McKenna College, moderator.

Reservations for meals in conjunction with the symposium "South Africa in Crisis," Monday and Tuesday, November 18-19, 1985, may be made by using the coupon in this issue of The Fortnightly.




FUTURE POSSIBILITIES

Athenaeum events often have to be planned far in advance if we are to bring highly visible persons here. Therefore, work is already under way for the 1986-87 season. We would like you to help us by generating ideas in at least two ways. First, below are some suggestions that have come to our attention already. If these persons appeared at the Athenaeum would you come to hear them? Please rate each possibility on a scale of one to five (five means you would stop at nothing to be here; one means you would be unlikely to appear under any circumstances), and put the results in the Athenaeum's mailbox. Second, in the remaining space please note some persons and/or topics that you would like the Athenaeum to feature in 1986-87.

- David Byrne, lead vocalist for the rock group, "Talking Heads"
- Bob Geldof, coordinator of "Live-Aid" and lead vocalist for the "Boomtown Rats"
- Morton Kondracke, editor of the New Republic and columnist for The Wall Street Journal
- Ursula Le Guin, science fiction novelist whose work includes The Left Hand of Darkness (1980)
- Leonard Peikoff, leading interpreter of the fiction and philosophy of Ayn Rand
- Chaim Potok, author of The Chosen (1967) and The Promise (1969)
- Herman Wouk, author of The Caine Mutiny (1951), The Winds of War (1971), and War and Remembrance (1978)
- John Updike, novelist (Rabbit Run (1960), Rabbit Redux (1971), Rabbit Is Rich (1981)), essayist, and poet
- Leon Uris, author of QBVII (1970) and Armageddon: A Novel of Berlin (1963)

Your suggestions of people and topics:




THE WEEKS AHEAD:
A Digest of Forthcoming Athenaeum-sponsored Events

November 18, 1985 "War" (Part VII with Dr. David Keithly, 4:15 p.m. through dinner)

November 18-19, 1985 "South Africa in Crisis"

November 20, 1985 "The Wednesday Lunch," 12:00 noon

November 20, 1985 Elie Wiesel: "How I Write," 11:00 a.m. through lunch. Mr. Wiesel gives a public lecture, "'The Responsibility of the Modern Writer," at 7:30 p.m., Garrison Theater.

November 21, 1985 Elie Wiesel: "What I Write," 11:00 a.m. through lunch

November 21, 1985 Thanksgiving Celebration, dinner, 6:00 p.m.

November 24, 1985 Sunday Brunch, 11:00 a.m.

November 25, 1985 "War" (Part VIII with Professor P. Edward Haley, 4:15 p.m. through dinner)

November 26, 1985 "An Evening with Morton Smith," distinguished biblical scholar; reception, 5:30; dinner, 6:00; lecture and discussion, 7:00 p.m. (Please contact Professor Kathleen Wicker, Scripps College, x3380, for further information.)

November 27, 1985 "The Wednesday Lunch," 12:00 noon

December 3, 1985 William Least Heat Moon: discussion, 11:00 a.m.; lunch, 12:00 noon; reception and dinner, 5:30 p.m.; remarks and discussion at 7:00 p.m.

December 5-7, 10, 12, 1985 Madrigal Feast, 6:30 p.m.