Silicon Valley Program

Resume Requirements

Students on the Silicon Valley Program must submit their resume in the approved SVP format. You will find a MS Word version of this format in the link below. The reason for this mandate is simple: by requiring all resumes to comply to the same format, employers reading the book can concentrate on the substance of your resume, not the form. When submitting your resume to employers, you may use whatever version you wish, however it is up to you to make sure that the version you send is completely free from errors, and is consistent with what you submit to the SVP.

The Silicon Valley Program produces a resume book featuring all of the students on the program each semester. In this way, prospective employers can get to know each of you. On occasion, an employer has contacted a student directly through this process. A consistent look in this resume book sends a polished message to those reading the book.

Before submitting your resume to the SVP director for comment, you should:

Format your resume in the approved format

  1. Approved Format, MS Word Version
  2. Resume Tips & Tricks
    • Read and understand "b." above. This is a document that explains the intricacies of the format in "a."
    • Carefully edit your bullet points to highlight your accomplishments at each element on your resume
    • Submit your resume to a resume consultant in the Office of Career Services for further comment
    • Make sure that any tech-related experiences shine through
    • Carefully edit your resume one last time.
  3. Laszlo Bock PO’92 on Effective Resumes:
    Another great source is Mr. Laszlo Bock, VP for People Operations at a little company called Google. Laszlo and his team probably sees 100k resumes per year, so has a good handle on what constitutes an effective resume. He recently wrote a blog post on the topic that can be found here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20140929001534-24454816-my-personal-formula-for-a-better-resume. This entire article is a good (quick!) read. He shows multiple examples of what makes an effective resume bullet point, demonstrating “good,” “better,” and “best” in a few areas. The transitions from “good” to “best” are illuminating. Spend some time thinking about this as you work on your SVP resume.