Marian Miner Cook
Athenaeum

A distinctive
feature of social and
cultural life at CMC

Monday, October 15, 2018

Monday, October 15, 2018 - Lunch Program
The Supreme Court and Beyond: What's Next in the Legal World?
Judge Andrew Gordon ’84, Jerome Haig ’84 P'22, Greg Koltun ’84 P'21, and Judge Suzanne Segal ’82 P'18, panelists

With recent groundbreaking decisions at the Supreme Court, turmoil in the confirmation process, sea change in the composition of the Court, there is much to discuss about the Supreme Court and other important legal matters marching toward the Court. A distinguished panel of CMC alumni—U.S. District Court Judge Andrew Gordon ’84, defense attorney Jerome Haig ’84 P'22, litigation partner Greg Koltun ‘84 P'21, and United States Magistrate Judge Suzanne Segal ’82 P'18—will discuss these and other important issues in the American legal landscape.

Judge Andrew Gordon ’84 was appointed as a judge of United States District Court for Nevada in 2013. Before that, he was a partner at McDonald Carano Wilson LLP, where his practice focused on commercial litigation and he served as a private arbitrator and mediator. Gordon studied political science at CMC and received his J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Jerome Haig ’84 P'22 is a private practice defense attorney and a long-time senior trial lawyer in the public defender’s office. He specializes in complex felonies in state and federal court. Haig studied mathematics and political science at CMC and received his J.D. from Loyola University School of Law in Los Angeles. 

Greg Koltun ’84 P'21 is a litigation partner at Morrison Foerster, with a particular focus on complex commercial litigation and antitrust matters. He has experience litigating cases in state and federal courts and before arbitration tribunals throughout the country in a variety of industries and fields. Koltun studied economics at CMC and received his J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School.

Judge Suzanne Segal ’82 P'18 was appointed as a Magistrate Judge in California in 2002. Before that, she served as an Assistant United States Attorney, Civil Division, and Chief of Civil Appeals in the U.S. Attorney’s Office. Segal studied history and political science at CMC and received her J.D. from Cornell Law School.

 

Monday, October 15, 2018 - Evening Program
What Can the Romans Do For Us?
Emma Dench

What did it mean to be Roman in the ancient world, why did it matter in antiquity, and how might the study of the Roman empire benefit the modern world? Emma Dench, professor of ancient and modern history and of the classics and dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University will explore some of the ways in which groups and individuals in the Roman empire imagined and acted out what it was to be Roman and what Roman power meant to them and extend the conversation to modern citizenship.

Born in York, England, Emma Dench grew up near Stratford-Upon-Avon, and studied at Wadham College, Oxford and at St. Hugh's College, Oxford earning a DPhil in ancient history in 1993. Before taking up a joint appointment in the departments of the classics and of history at Harvard in January 2007, she taught classics and ancient history at Birkbeck College, University of London. She has been a Craven Fellow at the University of Oxford, a Rome Scholar and a Hugh Last Fellow at the British School of Rome, a Cotton Fellow, a member of the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, and a visiting professor of the classics and of history at Harvard, and a Loeb Classical Library Foundation Fellow.

Dench is the author of From Barbarians to New Men: Greek, Roman, and Modern Perceptions of Peoples from the Central Apennines (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1995) and Romulus' Asylum: Roman Identities from the Age of Alexander to the Age of Hadrian (Oxford University Press, 2005). She is currently completing Imperialism and Culture in the Roman World for the Cambridge University Press series Key Themes in Ancient History. Other current projects include a study of the retrospective writing of the Roman Republican past in classical antiquity.

At Harvard, Dench has been the recipient of a Harvard College Professorship for 2010–15 (recognizing "outstanding contributions to undergraduate teaching, mentoring and advising"), a Marquand Award for Excellent Advising and Counseling, and an Everett Mendelsohn Award for Excellence in Mentoring Graduate Students. In 2015–16, she also co- taught (with Frances Frei) an elective MBA course "All Roads Lead to Rome: Leadership Lessons from Antiquity," at the Harvard Business School. 

Photo credit: Kathleen Dooher

View Video: YouTube with Emma Dench

Food for Thought: Podcast with Emma Dench

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