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September 29, 2008

Vol. 24 , No. 02   

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Hazing, Harassment, Alcohol, and the Internet
JANET JUDGE
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2008

Many surveys suggest that over 80% of college athletes are hazed at some point in their athletic career. Examples of hazing range from members of the Los Angeles Dodgers shredding the clothes of rookie pitcher Chan Ho Park to individuals dying of alcohol poisoning. Hazing and athletic initiations have received more scrutiny lately with photos of these events being easily found online at sites including MySpace and Facebook. These photos have shut down some athletic programs and led to the firing of athletic coaches. Janet P. Judge, Esq. is an expert on sports and employment law. She uses her experience as an attorney to discuss social websites, drug and alcohol use, hazing and harassment, and the potential legal consequences of student-athlete conduct. In addition, Ms. Judge discusses the future employment implications for those who are involved in college athletic infractions, and those who post damaging personal information online.

Attorney Janet Judge focuses her practice on collegiate sports law and employment counseling at Sports Law Associates, LLC. She is the co-author of the newly released NCAA Manual on Title IX. She co-writes a bi-weekly column “Gender Equity Q & As” for NCAA News. Her work has been published in many journals including: Tort & Insurance Law Journal and the Seton Hall Journal of Sport Law. Ms. Judge also serves as the Vice-Chair of the Committee to Visit the Department of Athletics at Harvard College and is a member of Harvard’s NCAA Division I Athletics Certification Steering Committee. She is a graduate of Harvard/ Radcliffe College where she was an eight-time varsity letter winner in soccer, basketball and track & field. She received her law degree from Boston University and clerked for the Honorable Norman H. Stahl of the United State Court of Appeals.
Janet Judge’s appearance on the CMC campus is jointly sponsored by the CMS Athletic Department, the Kravis Leadership Institute, and the Athenaeum.




September 29, 2008

Vol. 24 , No. 02   

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To Drill or Not to Drill? Lessons from Brazil for the U.S. Alternative Energy Debate
MARC WEIDENMIER
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

In the current election cycle, both political parties are talking about the United States’ addiction to foreign oil, and possible ways to end this dependence. Some suggest encouraging alternative energy, while others suggest drilling off the coast of the United States. Yet, despite all this talk about the dangerous dependence on foreign oil, nothing has changed. The United States still imports over 10 million barrels of oil a day. Maybe it’s time for the United States to take a hint from Brazil. Why Brazil? Brazil is the only economically advanced country which has slashed its dependence on foreign oil. In only a number of years, Brazil has gone from importing almost 80% of its oil to currently importing only 10% of its oil, a feat accomplished through increasing domestic oil production and creating the most advanced alternative energy policy in the world. In fact, 60% of Brazil’s demand for fuel comes from sugar cane ethanol. Professor Marc Weidenmier has dedicated time to determining what the United States can learn from Brazil when it comes to energy policy.
Weidenmier is the inaugural William F. Podlich '66 Associate Professor of Economics, George R. Roberts Fellow, and the director of the Lowe Institute of Political Economy at CMC. A research associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research, he is also a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Economic History, and the Journal of Monetary and Financial History. Professor Weidenmier has published in a vast array of scholarly journals including the American Economic Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics and the Journal of Financial Economics. He received his B.A. from the College of William and Mary and received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois.




October 22, 2008

Vol. 24 , No. 03   

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Robert Day School Distinguished Speaker Series

Lunch with a Leader: The Media Industry
JEFFREY KLEIN '75 P'08 P'11
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2008
LUNCH 12:00 p.m. LECTURE 12:30 p.m.

Jeffrey Klein is a seasoned and highly regarded media CEO, a successful writer, and a popular lecturer. Trained as both a lawyer and a journalist, he has more than 20 years of experience operating newspaper, television, magazine, and internet businesses.

From 2001 to 2006, he was president and CEO of 101communications, a B2B publisher serving the Information Technology market, a company Klein co-founded with the backing of a Chicago-based private equity firm, The Frontenac Company. In April 2006, Klein and Frontenac sold 101 to 1105 Media, a holding company where Klein remained as Chairman of the Board.

Klein spent 15 years with the Los Angeles Times and Times Mirror in senior management positions, including Senior Vice President and General Manager, News and Senior Vice President, Consumer Marketing. He also served as president of two large regional editions of the newspaper. For several years, Klein was CEO of California Community Newspapers, Inc, a Times Mirror company.

Klein is one of the few traditional media executives who has successfully transitioned to the internet publishing model. In 2006, he was named to the “Folio Forty,” the list in Folio: of the 40 most influential people in the magazine industry. In 2004, he was selected as one of the three most innovative CEOs in trade publishing by B2B's Media Business magazine.

Klein began his career as a lawyer, first in the entertainment industry and later on behalf of the Los Angeles Times as a specialist in First Amendment issues. He has taught media law and media business classes at the University of Southern California for many years. For ten years, he also wrote a weekly consumer law column for the Los Angeles Times. He writes a regular column called Executive Perspective for Folio:, the magazine of magazine management.

Klein is active in the community, having served on various non-profit boards, including the United Way, Foundation for American Communications, and the Alliance for the Arts. He recently finished his two year term as president of the board of directors of MEND, Meet Each Need with Dignity, the largest privately funded antipoverty agency in the San Fernando Valley, where he led its recent $8.5 million capital campaign.

Klein received his master's degree in journalism from Columbia University, his law degree from Stanford University, and his bachelor's degree, summa cum laude, from Claremont McKenna College. He is married and has three daughters. During his presentation, Mr. Klein will discuss his previous experience and will also share some of his strategies for success.



DINNER FOR THE CLASS OF 2012

The Codger versus the Whippersnapper: Prospects for the 2008 Election
ANDREW BUSCH
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2008

The presidential election of 2008 pits Senator John McCain, portrayed by his critics as a grumpy "white-haired dude," against Senator Barack Obama, seen by his critics as "inexperienced, naïve, and arrogant" - McCain the "Codger" versus Obama the "Whippersnapper." What are the real strengths and weaknesses of each candidate? What will be their best strategies and what are the pitfalls most important for them to avoid? In a year that has already held many surprises, how much of the 2008 election will be framed by circumstances outside of the control of either candidate? In this freshman class talk, CMC's Professor Andrew E. Busch will explore these questions and more as he discusses the prospects and historical context for the 2008 election.

Andrew E. Busch is Professor of Government and Associate Dean of the Faculty at Claremont McKenna College. He has authored or co-authored ten books on American government and politics, including most recently The Constitution on the Campaign Trail: The Surprising Political Career of America's Founding Document (2007), Reagan's Victory: The 1980 Elections and the Rise of the Right (2005), and Red Over Blue: The 2004 Elections and American Politics (with James W. Ceaser) (2005). He is currently at work with James W. Ceaser and John J. Pitney on a book on the 2008 elections. Professor Busch received his B.A. from the University of Colorado and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. He taught for 12 years at the University of Denver before joining the CMC faculty in 2004.

Everyone at the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum looks forward to welcoming members of the class of 2012 on this special occasion. Freshmen are automatically signed up for the dinner. If you are unable attend please email laguiar@cmc.edu or call ext. 18244 to cancel. The 5:30 p.m. reception at the Flamson Plaza fountain will be followed by a served dinner at 6:00 p.m.


The Future of America's Preeminence in Asia
VICTOR CHA
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2008

As the Bush administration enters its final months in office, the salient question on the minds of most Asians and many policy studies experts and academics is what sort of Asia will this administration leave to the next one, whether Democrat or Republican? Do the Beijing Olympics finally mark the point at which the United States has lost its preeminent postwar position in Asia? Is America's "Eastern Sunset" on the horizon? How has the United States handled relations with China? Have the alliance relationships with Japan and South Korea suffered? Where will the North Korea nuclear negotiations be when Obama or McCain take office? And what of America's position in Southeast Asia?

Helping us to answer these and other questions is Victor Cha, Director of Asian Studies and D.S. Song Chair in the Department of Government and School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He left the White House in May 2007 after serving since 2004 as Director for Asian Affairs at the National Security Council. At the White House, he was responsible primarily for Japan, the Korean peninsula, Australia/New Zealand and Pacific Island nation affairs. Dr. Cha was also the Deputy Head of Delegation for the United States at the Six Party Talks in Beijing, and received two Outstanding Service commendations during his tenure at the NSC.
He is the award-winning author of Alignment Despite Antagonism: The United States-Korea-Japan Security Triangle (Stanford University Press, 2000) (winner of the 2000 Ohira Book Prize) and co-author of Nuclear North Korea: A Debate on Engagement Strategies (Columbia University Press, 2004). He has written articles on international relations and East Asia in journals including Foreign Affairs, International Security, Political Science Quarterly, Survival, International Studies Quarterly, and Asian Survey. Professor Cha received a doctoral degree from Columbia University. He is a former John M. Olin National Security Fellow at Harvard University, two-time Fulbright Scholar, and Hoover National Fellow and CISAC Fellow at Stanford University. His new book Beyond the Final Score: The Politics of Sport in Asia (Columbia University Press) will be released in 2008.
The Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies at CMC is honored to sponsor Victor Cha as the Freeman Foundation Visiting Professor of Asian Affairs.


Amateur Hour in Iraq: A Worm's Eye View on the Failure of Nation Building
HEATHER COYNE
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2008

The problems of the U.S. occupation in Iraq have been documented and debated primarily from a “bird’s eye” view of strategy, focusing on failures in planning, troop levels, and whether a nation-building or democratization was even possible. Yet, this view often neglects the crippling lack of capability on the ground at the tactical and operational levels, a “worm’s eye” view. Coalition military forces and civilian agencies worked at cross-purposes, in most cases without even the most basic conceptual and organizational frameworks for their well-intentioned initiatives. An understanding of the gaps in our implementing capability is critical to the current efforts to restructure U.S. and international responses to the complete range of peace operations - anything from humanitarian intervention to larger scale reconstruction efforts in failing states. The worm's eye view of our capability in Iraq provides a guide to developing the concepts, resources, staff, equipment, and training necessary to conduct such operations, and warns that current approaches to restructuring peace operations may not be adequate.

Heather Coyne will explain the “worm’s eye” view of the American mission in Iraq. She is a senior program officer in the Center for Mediation and Conflict Resolution. Coyne was the chief of party for the Institute’s activities in Iraq in 2003–2005.

Heather Coyne's visit to Claremont McKenna College is jointly sponsored by the Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies and the Athenaeum.


Kristallnacht: Memory and Legacies, The Synagogue and Its Rabbis under Oppression in Nazi Germany
MICHAEL BERENBAUM
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2008

November 9-10, 2008 marks the 70th anniversary of tragic event known as Kristallnacht (Crystal Night). On this evening, 92 Jews were murdered and 25,000 were arrested and deported to concentration camps in Nazi Germany. In addition, hundreds of synagogues were destroyed, and thousand of Jewish businesses and homes were ransacked. Kristallnacht is referred by many as the start of the Holocaust.

Michael Berenbaum is a writer, lecturer, and teacher consulting in the conceptual development of museums and the content and conceptual development of historical films. He is director of the Sigi Ziering Institute: Exploring the Ethical and Religious Implications of the Holocaust and also a professor of Jewish Studies at American Jewish University. For three years, he was President and Chief Executive Officer of the Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation. He was also the Director of the United States Holocaust Research Institute at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Previously he served as Director of the Jewish Community Council of Greater Washington, Opinion Page editor of the Washington Jewish Week and Deputy Director of the President's Commission on the Holocaust where he authored its Report to the President (1979). He has taught at Wesleyan University, Yale University and has served as a visiting professor at George Washington University, The University of Maryland, and American University. Berenbaum is the author and editor of sixteen books, scores of scholarly articles, and hundreds of journalistic pieces. His most recent books include: A Promise to Remember: The Holocaust in the Words and Voices of Its Survivors (2003) and After the Passion Has Passed: American Religious Consequences (2004).

Michael Berenbaum’s lecture at the Athenaeum is sponsored the Center for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights.


Inauguration Viewing
TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2009 8:30 a.m.

The Diversity Committee and the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum will host a live viewing of the 2009 Inauguration Swearing-In Ceremony at 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday, January 20. The official theme for the inauguration of President-elect Barack Obama is, “Renewing America’s Promise,“ a vision that underscores the President-elect and Vice President-elect’s commitment to restoring opportunity and possibility for all and re-establishing America’s standing as a beacon of hope around the world.

The Diversity Committee is a committee composed of faculty, staff, and students whose purpose is to foster initiatives to make CMC a more inclusive and inviting environment for all members of its community. We hope you can join us to witness this historical event. No RSVP required. Donuts, juice, and coffee will be provided.


Drawn from the Heart
Leonard Cohen Artwork Exhibition
Opens Monday, February 9, 2009

The Gould Center and Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum are pleased to present “Drawn from the Heart,” an exhibition of artwork from world-renowned artist, poet, and songwriter Leonard Cohen’s private collection.

Leonard Cohen is widely regarded as one of the most influential artists of our time. In addition to his internationally recognized music and poetry, Cohen’s artwork is taking center stage through the production of Book of Longing (2006), a concert work by world-renowned Philip Glass based on the poetry and artwork of Cohen’s recently published book of the same name. Performances of Book of Longing are scheduled from February 25-March 1, 2009, at Garrison Theater, Scripps Performing Arts Center. Tickets are available through Ticketmaster.

Spanning over 40 years, this collection highlights selected art from the drawings and journals of Cohen and reflects his life-long love of drawing. All images are produced with permanent pigmented ink on 300 lb. Arches watercolor paper, finished with a hand-deckled edge. For each print, Cohen has signed, titled, numbered and dated, and embossed and stamped with his official seal.

Cohen is a Canadian born poet, novelist, and song-writer. In addition to his music, Cohen’s collections of poetry, including Let Us Compare Mythologies (1956), and Flowers for Hitler (1964), and his novels, including Beautiful Losers (1966), have brought him international recognition. His dual interests in music and literature have produced notable works, including the albums Various Positions (1984), I’m Your Man (1988), The Future (1992), Dear Heather (2004), and Blue Alert (2006). His songs, including “Suzanne,” Hallelujah,” and “Bird on a Wire,” have been covered by hundreds of artists including Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, and k.d. Lang. In recognition of his remarkable work, Cohen was inducted into both the Canadian Music Hall of Fame and the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame. He also is a Companion of the Order of Canada, that nation’s highest civilian honor. In March 2008, Cohen was inducted into the American Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The exhibition will open to the public on Monday, February 9 and can be viewed from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday-Friday at the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum, 385 E. Eighth Street, Claremont, Calif. The Athenaeum may be closed to the public on holidays and for scheduled events. For more information about viewing times, please call (909) 621-8244.

The exhibition is sponsored by the Family of Benjamin Z. Gould Center for Humanistic Studies and the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College.

For more information about the Book of Longing performances, please visit www.claremontmckenna.edu/gould.


Drawn from the Heart
Leonard Cohen Artwork Exhibition
Now Open

The Gould Center and Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum are pleased to present “Drawn from the Heart,” an exhibition of artwork from world-renowned artist, poet, and songwriter Leonard Cohen’s private collection.

Leonard Cohen is widely regarded as one of the most influential artists of our time. In addition to his internationally recognized music and poetry, Cohen’s artwork is taking center stage through the production of Book of Longing (2006), a concert work by world-renowned Philip Glass based on the poetry and artwork of Cohen’s recently published book of the same name. Performances of Book of Longing are scheduled from February 25-March 1, 2009, at Garrison Theater, Scripps Performing Arts Center. Tickets are available through Ticketmaster.

Spanning over 40 years, this collection highlights selected art from the drawings and journals of Cohen and reflects his life-long love of drawing. All images are produced with permanent pigmented ink on 300 lb. Arches watercolor paper, finished with a hand-deckled edge. For each print, Cohen has signed, titled, numbered and dated, and embossed and stamped with his official seal.

Cohen is a Canadian born poet, novelist, and song-writer. In addition to his music, Cohen’s collections of poetry, including Let Us Compare Mythologies (1956), and Flowers for Hitler (1964), and his novels, including Beautiful Losers (1966), have brought him international recognition. His dual interests in music and literature have produced notable works, including the albums Various Positions (1984), I’m Your Man (1988), The Future (1992), Dear Heather (2004), and Blue Alert (2006). His songs, including “Suzanne,” Hallelujah,” and “Bird on a Wire,” have been covered by hundreds of artists including Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, and k.d. Lang. In recognition of his remarkable work, Cohen was inducted into both the Canadian Music Hall of Fame and the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame. He also is a Companion of the Order of Canada, that nation’s highest civilian honor. In March 2008, Cohen was inducted into the American Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The exhibition will open to the public on Monday, February 9 and can be viewed from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday-Friday at the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum, 385 E. Eighth Street, Claremont, Calif. The Athenaeum may be closed to the public on holidays and for scheduled events. For more information about viewing times, please call (909) 621-8244.

The exhibition is sponsored by the Family of Benjamin Z. Gould Center for Humanistic Studies and the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College.

For more information about the Book of Longing performances, please visit www.claremontmckenna.edu/gould.


Robert Day School Distinguished Speaker Series

Lunch with a Leader: Discovering the Leader Within You
TOM LINEBARGER '86
MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2009
LUNCH 11:30 a.m., LECTURE 12:00 p.m.

Tom Linebarger ’86 is the President and Chief Operating Officer of Cummins Inc., a global power leader that designs, manufactures, distributes and services engines and related technologies, including fuel systems, controls, air handling, filtration, emission solutions and electrical power generation systems.

Linebarger began his career at Prudential Investment Corporation and became an investment manager while pursuing an MS in Manufacturing Systems Engineering and an MBA from Stanford’s Graduate School of Business. After graduating from Stanford, he joined Cummins as a Program Manager and held numerous positions within the firm before being selected to his current role in August 2008.

Mr. Linebarger received a B.A. in economics from Claremont McKenna College and a B.S. in engineering from Stanford, and has served as a Board Member of Pactiv Corporation since 2005. During his presentation, Mr. Linebarger will discuss his previous experience and will also share some of his strategies for success.


Classical Liberalism in the Age of Obama
TIBOR MACHAN ‘65
MONDAY, MARCH 30, 2009
LUNCH 11:30 a.m., LECTURE 12:00 p.m.

The election of Barack Obama was historic. But what does his administration portend for classical liberalism? Senator Obama campaigned for higher taxes on the wealthy. His administration enacted a $787 billion economic stimulus. It has also increased federal spending and budget deficits.

Professor Tibor Machan will address these issues and others in his Athenaeum talk.

A former editor of the libertarian magazine, Reason, and a graduate of Claremont McKenna College, Professor Machan is a scholar and author of dozens of books on individual rights, libertarianism, and ethics. He is professor emeritus in the department of philosophy at Auburn University, and holds the R. C. Hoiles Chair of Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School of Business & Economics at Chapman University in Orange, California. Professor Machan is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, an adjunct faculty member of the Ludwig von Mises Institute, and an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute.

Tibor Machan’s visit to CMC is sponsored by the Salvatori Center for the Study of Individual Freedom in the Modern World.


Policy Issues Facing the Credit Derivatives Market
DARRELL DUFFIE
MONDAY, APRIL 13, 2009
LUNCH 11:30 a.m., LECTURE 12:00 p.m.

Darrell Duffie holds the Dean Witter Distinguished Professorship in Finance at the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, where he has been a member of the finance faculty since receiving his Ph.D. at Stanford in 1984. Duffie is the author of Dynamic Asset Pricing Theory (Princeton University Press 1993) and a coauthor with Ken Singleton of Credit Risk: Pricing, Measurement, and Management (Princeton University Press, 2003).

His recent research focuses on asset pricing, credit risk, fixed-income securities, and over-the-counter markets. Professor Duffie is the Vice President of The American Finance Association, a Fellow of the Econometric Society, a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a member of Moody's Academic Research Committee, the 2003 IAFE/Sunguard Financial Engineer of the Year, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is currently on the editorial boards of Econometrica and The Journal of Financial Economics, among other journals.

Professor Duffie’s luncheon presentation at the Athenaeum will explore the findings from his recent paper entitled, “Does A Central Clearing Counterparty Reduce Counterparty Risk?” He will also discuss the relevant policy issues that are affecting the credit derivatives market.

Darrell Duffie's lecture is sponsored by the Financial Economics Institute at CMC as part of the FEI speakers series.


Politics and the Presidency
KARL ROVE
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2008

In his acceptance speech for re-election in 2004, President Bush thanked Karl Rove as simply “the architect.” Mr. Rove has known George W. Bush since he delivered a set of keys to him as chairman of the College Republicans in Washington, D.C. and Mr. Bush was a student at Harvard Business School.

Rove has advised the President on all of his political campaigns, beginning with his 1978 failed run for Congress. He started the direct-mail business “Rove and Company” in Austin, Texas in 1981. In the 1980s and 1990s, his business worked for the election of a number of Texas Republican candidates, including the Senate elections of Phil Gramm and Kay Bailey Hutchinson, and gubernatorial election of Bill Clements; all of these elections were noteworthy because voters had not elected Republican candidates to statewide office since Reconstruction until the 1980s. In 1993 he counseled George W. Bush to run for Governor against the popular Democratic incumbent Ann Richards. Mr. Bush won in 1994 and again in 1998, and Karl Rove was the architect of his 2000 and 2004 Presidential campaigns. In the White House, he was the Deputy Chief of Staff and Senior Advisor to President Bush from 2000-2007.

In the 2002 midterm elections and the 2004 reelection of President Bush, Rove made the decision to make the War on Terror a central issue of the ultimately successful campaigns for Bush and Republicans in Congress. In 2005, President Bush also made him an assistant to the President in addition to being deputy Chief of Staff and Senior Advisor, reflecting his importance in the Bush Administration. Currently, he is a contributor to Fox News.

Karl Rove’s visit to campus is sponsored by the Pacesetters Fund and the Res Publica Society. Dinner seating in the Athenaeum is limited to the CMC community on a first-come basis. There will be an additional sign up on the reservation page for CMC persons only to attend the talk in the Athenaeum, also on a first-come basis. If you are already in the dinner, you do not need to sign up again, as this is for those CMC people who did not get into the dinner and wish to hear Karl Rove in the Athenaeum. General public viewing of the talk will be available in McKenna Auditorium.


To Drill or Not to Drill? Lessons from Brazil for the U.S. Alternative Energy Debate
MARC WEIDENMIER
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

In the current election cycle, both political parties are talking about the United States’ addiction to foreign oil, and possible ways to end this dependence. Some suggest encouraging alternative energy, while others suggest drilling off the coast of the United States. Yet, despite all this talk about the dangerous dependence on foreign oil, nothing has changed. The United States still imports over 10 million barrels of oil a day. Maybe it’s time for the United States to take a hint from Brazil. Why Brazil? Brazil is the only economically advanced country which has slashed its dependence on foreign oil. In only a number of years, Brazil has gone from importing almost 80% of its oil to currently importing only 10% of its oil, a feat accomplished through increasing domestic oil production and creating the most advanced alternative energy policy in the world. In fact, 60% of Brazil’s demand for fuel comes from sugar cane ethanol. Professor Marc Weidenmier has dedicated time to determining what the United States can learn from Brazil when it comes to energy policy.
Weidenmier is the inaugural William F. Podlich '66 Associate Professor of Economics, George R. Roberts Fellow, and the director of the Lowe Institute of Political Economy at CMC. A research associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research, he is also a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Economic History, and the Journal of Monetary and Financial History. Professor Weidenmier has published in a vast array of scholarly journals including the American Economic Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics and the Journal of Financial Economics. He received his B.A. from the College of William and Mary and received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois.


An Evening with the Author
ED MCCLANAHAN
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2008

Ed McClanahan describes his new book, O the Clear Moment (Counterpoint, 2008), as a collection of nine “marginally autobiographical” pieces that “incorporate a submerged or buried chronology, and add up to what I like to call an ‘implied autobiography.’” If indeed they ever were “submerged or buried,” the events, encounters, personages, and passions of McClanahan’s life have undergone a most remarkable — and hilarious — disinterment and reanimation in O the Clear Moment. From high school high jinks and adolescent infatuations in small - town Kentucky, to Merry Pranksterdom in the California enclave that included, besides McClanahan’s close friend Ken Kesey, counterculture icons Neal Cassady, Paul Krassner, and Sandy Lehman-Haupt, the peripatetic picaro crisscrosses the country in a medley of madcap peregrinations plotted only by what the author calls the “autobiographical imperative … asserting its self-important self.” Along the way, he moves from “coming of age,” to “coming of old age.” As the author put it in the chorus of the song he likes to call his Greatest Hit (“All the Roads [A Kentucky Derby Lullaby]”; his other song would have to runner-up),

All the roads in the world lead to home, sweet home;
They all lead the other way, too.
Some have to go, and some have to stay;
And some are just passin' through
.

Born in Brooksville, Kentucky and educated at Miami (Ohio) University and the University of Kentucky, Ed McClanahan has taught English and creative writing at Oregon State University, Stanford University, and the Universities of Kentucky and Northern Kentucky. His books include a novel, The Natural Man (1983); a memoir, Famous People I Have Known (1985); A Congress of Wonders (three novellas; 1996); and My Vita, If You Will (a miscellany of fiction, non-fiction, reviews, and commentary; 1996).

Ed McClanahan’s visit to Claremont McKenna College is sponsored by the Family of Benjamin Z. Gould Center for Humanistic Studies and CMC’s Department of Literature.


The Limits of American Power
ANDREW BACEVICH
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2008

As the United States struggles to fight two wars and elects a new president, a debate on American foreign policy is more relevant and necessary than any other time in recent memory. Under what conditions should America use force? How do we end our involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan? To what degree can we influence events outside our borders?

Andrew Bacevich, professor of international relations at Boston University, will address these questions and others in his lecture. Dr. Bacevich is the author of The Limits of Power: American Exceptionalism (2008). His previous books include American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of U.S. Diplomacy (2002) and The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War (2005). His essays and reviews have appeared in a wide variety of scholarly and general interest publications including The Wilson Quarterly, The National Interest, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, The Nation, The American Conservative, and The New Republic. His op-eds have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Boston Globe, Los Angeles Times, and USA Today.

Dr. Bacevich is a graduate of West Point and received his Ph.D. in American Diplomatic History from Princeton University.

In observance of Veteran’s Day honoring all military veterans the visit to campus by Andrew Bacevich is jointly sponsored by the Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies and the Athenaeum.


CMC's 22nd Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Lecture

Genetics, Genealogy, and African American History
HENRY LOUIS GATES, JR.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 2009

Each year since 1988 the Athenaeum has invited a distinguished guest to speak in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This year’s speaker is one of the country’s most well known literary critics, scholars, and intellectuals. From topics ranging from African literary traditions to slave narratives to Oprah’s roots, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. has dedicated his career to a multitude of intellectual pursuits.

Gates is the Editor-in-Chief of the Oxford African American Studies Center and of the Root online news magazine. Gates has authored over 10 books including The Signifying Monkey: A Theory of African-American Literary Criticism (1989), a 1989 American Book Award Winner. Among the many works he has edited, Gates is well known for publishing Our Nig (2002), the first novel published by an African American woman. He wrote and produced the PBS documentaries, “African American Lives (2006),” “Wonders of the African World (1999),” and “America Beyond the Color Line (2004).” Gates has also written for Time magazine, the New York Times, and the New Yorker.

Gates is currently the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University. Gates has previously taught at Yale, Cornell, and Duke. He has received many awards including a spot on Time magazine’s “25 Most Influential Americans,” the George Polk Award for Social Commentary, a National Humanities Medal, and election to the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Professor Gates received his undergraduate degree from Yale and was appointed a “Scholar of the House” during his final year at Yale. After graduating, Gates was the first African American to be awarded a Mellon Foundation Fellowship. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. in English Literature from Clare College at the University of Cambridge. Gates has received approximately 50 honorary degrees from institutions, including the University of Pennsylvania, Dartmouth College, and Harvard University.


Rousseau and the Modern Cult of Sincerity
ARTHUR MELZER
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009
Arthur Melzer is primarily interested in studying the cultural discontents that modern liberal democratic capitalism has generated and the counter-ideals spawned by those discontents. His research has focused largely on Jean-Jacques Rousseau, the father of almost all modern culture criticism and the originator of such counter-cultural ideals as Romanticism, bohemianism, sincerity or authenticity, secular compassion, and historical relativism. Professor Melzer also has a strong interest in the ethical writings of Aristotle.

Arthur Melzer is a professor in the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University. He is also a co-founder and co-director of the Symposium on Science, Reason, and Modern Democracy, an independent research center, housed in the Political Science Department, which is dedicated to the study of the theory and practice of modern democracy.
He received his B.A. from Cornell University in 1971 and his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1978. He is the author of The Natural Goodness of Man: On the System of Rousseau's Thought (1990), and is the co-editor of eight volumes of essays on political philosophy. He has been awarded research fellowships by the Mellon Foundation, the Institute for Educational Affairs, the Earhart Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He is a winner of the MSU Social Science Alumni Outstanding Teaching Award.

Professor Melzer’s Athenaeum lecture is part of the series “Self and Society” and sponsored by the Dean of Faculty at CMC.


President Washington and Public Religion
JEFFRY MORRISON
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009
LUNCH 11:30 a.m., LECTURE 12:00 p.m.

Despite condescending attitudes from his presidential successors - John Adams said that he was too “illiterate” to run the country, and Thomas Jefferson that his slow mind lacked “imagination” — Professor Jeffry Morrison will suggest that George Washington had a keen practical intelligence that was especially evident in the public treatment of religion throughout his two ground-breaking terms as chief executive. He had a special knack for using religion to accomplish political ends, and Washington succeeded in this regard where his immediate presidential successors, ironically, failed. As president, Washington deftly used religion to foster unity in the infant United States. He brought religious minorities and even majority Christian groups who were upset with the “godless” Constitution into the national fold with reassuring rhetoric in his correspondence. Moreover, he gave religion a public face in government ceremonies, particularly in his first inauguration. At the self-imposed end of his presidency, Washington’s valedictory Farewell Address underscored the importance of religion in sustaining the young American republic. And throughout his two terms he successfully balanced public religion with religious liberty. In his remarks, Professor Morrison will also pay special attention to how President Washington used biblical and Anglican language in his political rhetoric.

Jeffry H. Morrison is associate professor of government at Regent University and a faculty member at the federal government’s James Madison Foundation in Washington, D.C. In 2006-07 he received the Chancellor’s Award as Regent University’s scholar-teacher of the year. He has also taught at Princeton University, at Georgetown University, and at the United States Air Force Academy. He graduated with distinction from Boston College and from Georgetown, where he received his Ph.D. He is co-editor of The Founders on God and Government (Rowman & Littlefield, 2004), and author of John Witherspoon and the Founding of the American Republic (University of Notre Dame Press, 2005), The Political Philosophy of George Washington (Johns Hopkins University Press, forthcoming in 2009), and chapters, articles and reviews on American political thought.

Professor Morrison’s lecture is sponsored by the Salvatori Center for the Study of Individual Freedom in the Modern World.