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November 10, 2014

Vol. 30 , No. 05   

View Entire Issue (Vol. 30 , No. 05)


MARIAN MINER COOK ATHENAEUM
RECORDING POLICY

  • It is the policy of the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum that no lecture, appearance or performance by any speaker or performer at the Athenaeum is to be videotaped, audiotaped, or otherwise recorded and/or broadcast without the prior written permission of the relevant speaker, performer, or other authorized owner of the intellectual property rights to the event.


  • Anyone requesting permission to record an event is required to submit an “Event Recording Request Form” to the director of the Athenaeum, at least 48 hours in advance of the relevant event.


  • It is understood that the speaker, the performer, the Athenaeum, and any other event sponsor, as appropriate, reserve all intellectual property rights for each Athenaeum event.


  • If you have any questions regarding this policy, please contact the director at athenaeum@cmc.edu or at (909) 607-4180.




November 10, 2014

Vol. 30 , No. 05   

View Entire Issue (Vol. 30 , No. 05)


Holes with History: Sculpture in the Late 1960s
PHILIPP KAISER
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2014

In the second half of the 1960s artists went underground for the first time. Philipp Kaiser, a renowned curator and art historian, reveals the radical shift that sculpture took in which it redefined its own categories. By deconstructing and negating its own forms, it went so far as to question sculpture’s legitimacy. On various continents artists, unbeknownst to each other, began to create negative sculptures by digging trenches and holes in the surface of the earth. This simultaneous occurrence in the late 1960s was not so much a coincidence as an expression of a specific historical, political and cultural post-war state of affairs.

Philipp Kaiser, Ph.D., is the former director of the Museum Ludwig in Cologne and has also served as the senior curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (MOCA). At MOCA, Kaiser organized ‘Ends of the Earth,’ a historical survey of Land Art with Co-Curator Miwon Kwon (Professor of Art History at UCLA). From 2001 to 2006 he was curator for modern and contemporary art at the Museum für Gegenwartskunst Basel.

He has realized large-scale exhibitions on the art of the 1980s, on California Conceptualism and conceived various individual shows with artists such as Jack Goldstein, Bruce Nauman, Louise Lawler, Simon Starling, and Christian Philipp Müller.
In addition to his curatorial responsibilities, he has published numerous contributions for art magazines, catalogs, and other publications and has taught Art History at the Academy of Fine Arts, Karlsruhe/Germany and the University of California.

Kaiser studied at the Universities of Basel/Switzerland and Hamburg. He was the former director of the Museum Ludwig in Cologne, and his talk is the 2014 Golo Mann Lecture and is sponsored by the Gould Center for Humanistic Studies.



The Great War in Poetry and Song
JEREMY HUW WILLIAMS, baritone
PAULA FAN, piano
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2014

2014 marks 100 years since the start of the First World War. It was supposed to be "the war to end all wars," the Great War from 1914-1918. To this day, scholars still debate its origins and consequences. During fall 2014 the Claremont Colleges Library has honored the lives lost by bringing to light new discoveries in its collections. "Over There, Over Here" was researched and curated by students who completed Claremont McKenna College's history course, "The Great War," offered by Professor Wendy Lower. The Athenaeum is pleased to host a concert of music and poetry from this era as part of the College’s commemoration of the Centenary of the Great War.

The Welsh baritone Jeremy Huw Williams studied at St John's College, Cambridge, at the National Opera Studio, and with April Cantelo. He made his debut with Welsh National Opera as Guglielmo (Così fan tutte) and has since appeared in sixty operatic roles. He has given performances at major venues in North and South America, Australia, Hong Kong, and most European countries.

He is renowned as a fine exponent of contemporary music, having commissioned much new music and given premieres of works by Alun Hoddinott, William Mathias, John Tavener, Michael Berkeley, Paul Mealor, Julian Phillips, Richard Causton, Mark Bowden, and Huw Watkins. He frequently records for BBC Radio 3 (in recital, and with the BBC NOW, CBSO, BBC SO, BBC SSO, BBC Philharmonic and BBC CO), and has made many commercial recordings, including eight solo discs of songs.

As a principal singer with Welsh National Opera, he appeared at the opening night of the Wales Millennium Centre and received the inaugural Sir Geraint Evans Award from the Welsh Music Guild, given annually to a person or persons who have made a significant contribution to Welsh music in any one year or recent years.

He was awarded an Honorary Fellowship by Glyndwr University in 2009 for services to music in Wales, and received the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Music from the University of Aberdeen in 2011.

Performing with Williams is Paula Fan on piano. Dr. Fan is pianist with the Tucson Symphony Orchestra.



Morality Here and There: Aristotle in Bali
J. DAVID VELLEMAN
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

J. David Velleman (Ph.D., Princeton, 1983), is a Professor of Philosophy and Bioethics at New york University. Professor Velleman's work in the philosophy of action includes the book Practical Reflection (Princeton 1989) and a collection of papers, The Possibility of Practical Reason (reprinted 2009, University of Michigan). His papers on the self are collected in a volume entitled Self to Self (Cambridge 2006).

His most recent book, on the foundations of morality, is How We Get Along (Cambridge 2009). The sequel, Foundations for Moral Relativism, is available as an open-access monograph from OpenBook Publishers. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Guggenheim Foundation, and he serves (with Stephen Darwall) as founding co-Editor of Philosophers' Imprint.

Velleman is speaking at the Athenaeum at the invitation of the Family of Benjamin Z. Gould Center for Humanistic Studies at CMC and is the 2014 Quinones Distinguished Lecturer.


From Aryanization to Auschwitz: German Corporations and the Holocaust
PETER HAYES
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2014

Peter Hayes is a renowned expert in Holocaust studies. He has published some seventy articles or chapters in American and European journals and books, In 1988, his book Industry and Ideology: IG Farben in the Nazi Era (Cambridge University Press), a study of the largest corporation in Germany between 1925 and 1945, won the Biennial Book Prize from the Conference Group for Central European History of the American Historical Association. In 1992, Lessons and Legacies I received the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for its "outstanding contribution to the literature on cultural diversity and prejudice." His most recent books are From Cooperation to Complicity: Degussa in the Third Reich (2004), and The Oxford Handbook of Holocaust Studies (ed. with John K. Roth; 2011). His anthology of historical writing on the Holocaust, entitled How Was It Possible? A Holocaust Reader will appear in 2015, and he is currently preparing an interpretive survey of the same subject tentatively entitled The Holocaust: The Big Questions and Their Answers.

Professor Hayes has taught at Northwestern University since 1980 in the departments of History and German. He also holds the Theodore Zev Weiss Holocaust Educational Foundation Chair in Holocaust Outside Northwestern, he chairs the Academic Committee of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington DC and has served previously on the Academic Advisory Boards of the German Society for Business History, the Fritz Bauer Institute in Frankfurt, and the Concentration Camp Memorials at Buchenwald and Dora, and on the Historians Advisory Panel to the U.S. government’s Interagency Working Group on Nazi War Crimes and Imperial Japanese Records. Among the prestigious fellowships he has held are awards from the American Council of Learned Societies and the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation. In 1997-98, he was the J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Senior Scholar-in-Residence at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.; in 2009, he directed and taught the Silberman Summer Seminar for Faculty at that institution; and in 2013, he delivered its prestigious Meyerhoff Lecture.

Professor Hayes earned his Bachelor's degree magna cum laude at Bowdoin College, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Awarded a Keasbey Scholarship to Balliol College, Oxford, he followed up his M.A. there with a term as Henry Luce Scholar at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and a Ph.D. in modern German history from Yale. While doing graduate work, he also studied at the University of Cologne, supported by fellowships from the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst and the Social Science Research Council.

Peter Hayes' talk is sponsored by the Center for Human Rights at CMC.


A Job-Friendly Education and the Humanities: The Late Antique Side of the Story
EDWARD WATTS
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2014

Edward Watts is the Alkividias Vassilidias Chair and Professor of History at U.C. San Diego

The push towards a "job-friendly" education is hardly a twenty-first century phenomenon. Roman parents and students faced similar pressures in the fourth and fifth centuries as the Roman state greatly expanded the number of well- paying jobs available to upper class citizens and defined the type of education that job applicants should have. This distorted the way that education worked in the period. Increased imperial attention inflated the number of students enrolling in some disciplines that led to government jobs (like law), while governmental neglect gave surprising autonomy to disciplines like philosophy that had no direct connection to employment. This had a number of unforeseen consequences. Most notably, the educational priorities of a Christian Roman government unwittingly ensured the persistence of traditionalist, pagan dominated philosophical education into the sixth century.

This lecture will explore the relationship of government to education, education to religion, and, ultimately, the shape of intellectual culture that survived the decline and fall of the Roman Empire.

Professor Watts’ numerous publications include City and School in Late Antique Athens and Alexandria (2006), Riot in Alexandria: Tradition and Group Dynamics in Late Antique Pagan and Christian Communities (2010), and The Final Pagan Generation (2015).



Leader-sheep and Elite Education
WILLIAM DERESIEWICZ
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2014

William Deresiewicz is a contributing writer for The Nation and a contributing editor for The New Republic and The American Scholar, for which he writes the weekly All Points blog on culture and society. In 2011, Deresiewicz published A Jane Austen Education: How Six Novels Taught Me about Love, Friendship, and the Things That Really Matter.

Before becoming a full-time writer, Bill Deresiewicz was an English professor at Yale from 1998-2008, where he taught courses in modern British fiction, the Great Books, Indian fiction, and writing. As an academic, he published Jane Austen and the Romantic Poets in 2004 and numerous articles on George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, and Joseph Conrad. He received his Ph.D. and undergraduate education from Columbia University.

His essays and reviews have appeared in The New York Times, Slate, Bookforum, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and The London Review of Books. His current book is Excellent Sheep: Thinking for Yourself, Inventing Your Life, and Other Things the Ivy League Won't Teach You, was published in 2014 from Simon & Schuster.


Holes with History: Sculpture in the Late 1960s
PHILIPP KAISER
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2014

In the second half of the 1960s artists went underground for the first time. Philipp Kaiser, a renowned curator and art historian, reveals the radical shift that sculpture took in which it redefined its own categories. By deconstructing and negating its own forms, it went so far as to question sculpture’s legitimacy. On various continents artists, unbeknownst to each other, began to create negative sculptures by digging trenches and holes in the surface of the earth. This simultaneous occurrence in the late 1960s was not so much a coincidence as an expression of a specific historical, political and cultural post-war state of affairs.

Philipp Kaiser, Ph.D., is the former director of the Museum Ludwig in Cologne and has also served as the senior curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (MOCA). At MOCA, Kaiser organized ‘Ends of the Earth,’ a historical survey of Land Art with Co-Curator Miwon Kwon (Professor of Art History at UCLA). From 2001 to 2006 he was curator for modern and contemporary art at the Museum für Gegenwartskunst Basel.

He has realized large-scale exhibitions on the art of the 1980s, on California Conceptualism and conceived various individual shows with artists such as Jack Goldstein, Bruce Nauman, Louise Lawler, Simon Starling, and Christian Philipp Müller.
In addition to his curatorial responsibilities, he has published numerous contributions for art magazines, catalogs, and other publications and has taught Art History at the Academy of Fine Arts, Karlsruhe/Germany and the University of California.

Kaiser studied at the Universities of Basel/Switzerland and Hamburg. He was the former director of the Museum Ludwig in Cologne, and his talk is the 2014 Golo Mann Lecture and is sponsored by the Gould Center for Humanistic Studies.


Cataloging A World Behind Wire: The USHMM Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos
GEOFFREY MEGARGEE
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2014
LUNCHEON 11:30 a.m.; PROGRAM 12:00 p.m.

Geoffrey Megargee, Ph.D., holds the position of Senior Applied Research Scholar in the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, where he is editor-in-chief of the Museum’s multi-volume Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos, 1933-1945. The first volume of that work, which appeared in June 2009, has won a National Jewish Book Award and the Association of Jewish Libraries’ Judaica Reference Award.

Dr. Megargee received his Ph.D. in military history from Ohio State University and is the recipient of, among other honors, a Fulbright grant for research in Germany, upon which he based his book Inside Hitler’s High Command (winner of the Society for Military History’s 2001 Distinguished Book Award). He is also the author of War of Annihilation: Combat and Genocide on the Eastern Front, 1941 and Barbarossa 1941: Hitler's War of Annihilation (2008).

Over the course of the last 15 years, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has been compiling an encyclopedia that, when complete, will be the world's most comprehensive source of information on the camps, ghettos, and other sites of detention, persecution, and murder under Nazi Germany and its European allies. The process of creating the encyclopedia has revealed much new information, not just about the individual camps, but about their variety, the prisoners' experiences, and their visibility within German society. Dr. Geoffrey Megargee, the project director and general editor, will provide an overview of the camp universe and discuss the ways in which the project has changed our understanding of the history.

Geoffrey Megaree's visit to CMC is sponsored by the Center for Human Rights.


Finding Your Inner Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing
ASHLEY MERRYMAN
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2014

Ashley Merryman's insights change the national dialogue. With Po Bronson, she's written two New York Times bestselling books – Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing and NurtureShock: New Thinking about Children. Together, they've won nine national awards for reporting. Her New York Times essay "Losing is Good for You" was shared on Facebook 40,000 times within the first 24-hours of publication while "Creativity Crisis," another feature with Bronson, catalyzed new education legislation across the US. Merryman and Bronson's new book, Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing, published by Twelve, was an instant New York Times bestseller, and foreign language editions are underway. Among the critical raves – Top Dog was a "Best Book of the Month" by both Barnes & Noble and Amazon, on a number of "Best of 2013" lists, and Salary.com said it was the #1 book that every entrepreneur must read.

Merryman and Bronson's previous book, NurtureShockNew York Times bestseller list for more than six months and an Amazon Top Nonfiction 100 book for over a year; it was on over 35 "Year's Best" lists and has been translated in 19 languages to date. NurtureShock has become one of the most influential books about children ever been published.

Using science to develop a fuller picture of our lives – as individuals and as a society – Merryman and Bronson have written cover stories for Newsweek and New York. Merryman has also written for the New York Times, Time, the Washington Post, the Guardian, the Huffington Post, the Daily Beast, and more. She has appeared on many radio and television shows including: CNN's Anderson Cooper 360 and CNN Newsroom; The Charlie Rose Show; Fox and Friends; The Tavis Smiley Show; @KatieCouric; Canada AM; CBC's Q and Ideas; BBC World News; NPR's Tell Me More and On Point; and many others around the world.

Merryman and Bronson have received the PEN Center USA Literary Award for Journalism and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Award for Science Journalism and among many others. Their work has been cited as a research authority in 106 academic journals and 343 books, and it is being used as text in universities around the world. You'll find references to their work in publications by the White House to speeches by politicians around the globe; schools have changed their practices and legislatures have written laws responding to their work.

Merryman has a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the USC School of Cinematic Arts and a Juris Doctorate from Georgetown University. An attorney, Merryman previously served as a speechwriter and in other positions in the Clinton Administration.

Ashley Merryman is sponsored by the CMS Athletic program.


ATHENAEUM ETIQUETTE

  • The Athenaeum serves as a gathering place where ideas, inquiry, and fellowship bring students, faculty, staff, other scholars, and nationally prominent speakers together.


  • Attendance at any event may be limited to persons associated with CMC, to the people who signed up for the dinner, or to the maximum number of people allowed by fire regulations.


  • On some occasions the speaker may address the group in another forum or the College may set up a video feed to handle an overflow crowd. All programs at the Athenaeum are filmed. Individuals attending should understand that their image might appear on the videotape.


  • House rules and common courtesy prohibit disruptive actions inside the building during an Athenaeum sponsored program.


  • Time allowing, there will be a period set aside for questions. Students will have priority during this portion of the program.


  • Guests are expected to dress appropriately in all dining rooms. Shorts, jeans, and t-shirts are not acceptable at dinner; more casual attire is acceptable for lunch and tea. No bare feet at any time.



MARIAN MINER COOK ATHENAEUM
RECORDING POLICY

  • It is the policy of the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum that no lecture, appearance or performance by any speaker or performer at the Athenaeum is to be videotaped, audiotaped, or otherwise recorded and/or broadcast without the prior written permission of the relevant speaker, performer, or other authorized owner of the intellectual property rights to the event.


  • Anyone requesting permission to record an event is required to submit an “Event Recording Request Form” to the director of the Athenaeum, at least 48 hours in advance of the relevant event.


  • It is understood that the speaker, the performer, the Athenaeum, and any other event sponsor, as appropriate, reserve all intellectual property rights for each Athenaeum event.


  • If you have any questions regarding this policy, please contact the director at athenaeum@cmc.edu or at (909) 607-4180.