Marian Miner Cook
Athenaeum

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Thursday, October 26, 2017

Thursday, October 26, 2017 - Lunch Program
Why Free Speech Matters on Campus
Keith E. Whittington

Keith E. Whittington, professor of politics at Princeton University, will argue that robust protection of free speech and civil discourse is essential for universities to fulfill their distinct and important mission to assemble and nurture an open and diverse community of scholars, teachers, and students dedicated to the production and dissemination of knowledge. Understanding the relationship between the critical functions of the university and the principles of free speech can help provide guidance in resolving the difficult challenges that confront modern universities.

Keith E. Whittington is the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics at Princeton University. He is the author of "Political Foundations of Judicial Supremacy: The Presidency, the Supreme Court, and Constitutional Leadership in U.S. History," "Constitutional Interpretation: Textual Meaning, Original Intent and Judicial Review," and "Constitutional Construction: Divided Powers and Constitutional Meaning," among others. He is also a co-editor of "Congress and the Constitution" and "The Oxford Handbook of Law and Politics."  He has published widely on American constitutional theory and development, judicial politics, the presidency, and federalism.

Whittington is currently working on a political history of the judicial review of federal statutes and preparing, with Howard Gillman and Mark Graber, a book of cases and materials on American constitutionalism. His work has won the C. Herman Pritchett Award for best book in law and courts and the J. David Greenstone Award for best book in politics and history.  He has been a John M. Olin Foundation Faculty Fellow, an American Council of Learned Societies Junior Faculty Fellow, a visiting scholar at the Social Philosophy and Policy Center, and a visiting professor at the University of Texas School of Law. He is a member of the American Academy of the Arts and Sciences. He received a Ph.D. in political science from Yale University. 

Professor Whittington will deliver the Salvatori Center’s Lofgren Lecture on American Constitutionalism. Along with the Salvatori Center, his talk is also co-sponsored by the Rose Institute of State and Local Government at CMC.

Thursday, October 26, 2017 - Evening Program
American Shtetl: A Hasidic Town in Suburban New York
David N. Myers

David Myers, historian at UCLA, will explore the curious case of Kiryas Joel, a legally recognized municipality in the State of New York. Is this community's existence consistent with or is it a deviation from the American legal and political tradition?

David N. Myers is the Sady and Ludwig Kahn Professor of Jewish History at UCLA and is serving in 2017-18 as the inaugural director of the UCLA Luskin Center for History and Policy. He is also president and CEO of the Center for Jewish History in New York City.

Myers has written widely in the fields of Jewish intellectual and cultural history. His books include Re-Inventing the Jewish Past (Oxford, 1995), Resisting History: The Crisis of Historicism in German-Jewish Thought (Princeton, 2003), Between Jew and Arab: The Lost Voice of Simon Rawidowicz (Brandeis, 2008), and Jewish History: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2017). He is the author of the forthcoming The Stakes of Jewish History: On the Use and Abuse of Jewish History for Life (Yale, 2017). He is also the editor or co-editor of numerous works. He is currently completing a monograph, with Nomi Stolzenberg, on the Satmar Hasidic community of Kiryas Joel, New York. 

An alumnus of Yale College, Myers completed his graduate studies at Tel-Aviv and Harvard Universities before receiving his Ph.D. with distinction in 1991 in Jewish history from Columbia University.

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