CMC students and alumni win Fulbrights, distinguished awards

CMC finished the 2017-18 academic year with several students and alumni earning prestigious grants and scholarships to learn and teach abroad.

The largest group, eight CMCers, will spend the year studying, teaching English, or conducting research as part of the renowned Fulbright U.S. Student Program. The longstanding initiative, part of a flagship government exchange designed to promote global understanding, offers a one-year fellowship to grantees. Fulbright operates in more than 140 countries.

This year’s class of recipients ties the second-highest total in the college’s history—a distinction also reached in 2015-16, 2014-15, and 2010-11. The all-time high for CMC is nine in 2012-13.

Along with the Fulbright cohort, several other CMC students were awarded selective overseas grants and scholarships. In fact, Jasmine Shirey ’18 landed two—the Napier Initiative and Davis Project for Peace grant—for her community development project in Zimbabwe.

“After watching these young men and women write draft after draft of their applications and go through intense interviews, I’m confident that they are prepared to represent the very best of America as they embark on research and teaching abroad,” said Brian Davidson ’08, Director of Fellowship Advising. “I am excited to see what the experience has in store for them, and I expect that their travels will stick with them throughout their lives and future careers.”

Congratulations to all of this year’s CMC winners.

Fulbright grants

  • Pastor Arroyo ’18, English Teaching Assistant, Panama
  • Melissa Muller ’18, Research—Political Science, Germany
  • Larissa Peltola ’18, English Teaching Assistant, Hungary
  • Chloe Rodman ’18, English Teaching Assistant, Taiwan
  • Emily Segal ’18, English Teaching Assistant, Spain
  • Amy Wu ’18, Research—Economics, Hungary
  • John Dewald ’17, English Teaching Assistant, Brazil
  • Anna Shepard ’17, English Teaching Assistant, Colombia

Napier Initiative ($15,000 for creative leadership and community development)

  • Jasmine Shirey ’18, Zimbabwe

Davis Projects for Peace ($10,000 grant for a significant community development project)

  • Jasmine Shirey ’18, Zimbabwe

JET Program (teaching English in Japan)

  • Cheryl Smith ’18, Japan
  • Brian Sydow ’18, Japan

U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarship (7-10 weeks of intensive language study abroad)

  • Juana Granados ’18, Russia
  • Charlotte Reinnoldt ’19, Indonesia

Luce Scholars Program (yearlong work placement in any field in Asia)

  • Robert MacGregor ’13