Summer 2020 SRP Opportunities

Science students apply to the Keck Science Department for summer research opportunities in faculty labs (contact Velda Yount, VYount@kecksci.claremont.edu), not to the SRP.

Supervised Student Research: Independent Project

Students are invited to design a research project of their own and seek out a willing summer faculty advisor. In doing so, students are required to secure an advisor’s approval of the project and agreement on total number of weeks of full-time work (8 or 10 weeks between May 26 and July 31), as well as the work expectations and outcomes (e.g., check-ins, lab reports, research paper/poster), before submitting the application.

Supervised Student Research at the METRICS Lab with Prof. Jenn Feitosa (Organizational Psychology)

Research opportunities to study diversity and teamwork in the workplace through supervised research projects with Prof. Jenn Feitosa at the METRICS Lab. METRICS Lab stands for the Methodological Examination of Teams Research in Inter-Cultural Settings. This summer research opportunity is full-time work over 8-10 weeks (May 26 – July 31) either on a current diverse teams research project with the METRICS Lab or an independently designed research project focused on diverse teams at work. We are looking for responsible, motivated, and hard-working individuals.

The METRICS Lab conducts research on diverse teams topics such as:

  • How trust evolves in various teams
  • The mosaic of identities and contextual cues
  • The intersect between diversity types
  • Measuring diverse teams

If interested, contact Dr. Jenn Feitosa (jfeitosa@cmc.edu). Advisor must approve of the application, including total number of weeks of full-time work (8 or 10 weeks between May 26 and July 31), as well as the work expectations and outcomes (e.g., check-ins, lab reports, research paper/poster), before submission.

Supervised Student Research with Prof. Andrew Sinclair (Government)

Project #1 Description: Andrew Sinclair (Government) is interested in offering a summer research opportunity in electoral institutions and administrative reforms. This project will involve historical and contemporary research in state and local politics and administration. Applying students should have an interest in the use of quantitative methods for studying social science problems, although prior experience is not required and students from any major or program of study at CMC are welcome to apply. Preferred project length is 10 weeks. For further information, contact asinclair@cmc.edu.
Advisor must approve of the application, including total number of weeks of full-time work (8 or 10 weeks between May 26 – July 31), as well as the work expectations and outcomes (e.g., check-ins, lab reports, research paper/poster), before submission.

Project #2 Description: Andrew Sinclair (Government) is willing to supervise an independent project for the summer research program in the areas of electoral institutions, political behavior, public policy, or public administration. Students with project proposals in mind should contact asinclair@cmc.edu in advance of sending an application in through https://www.cmc.edu/summer-research. Students need only be interested in government or public affairs; students from any major or program of study at CMC are welcome to inquire.

Advisor must approve of the application, including total number of weeks of full-time work (8 or 10 weeks between May 26 – July 31), as well as the work expectations and outcomes (e.g., check-ins, lab reports, research paper/poster), before submission.

Supervised Student Research with Prof. Chiu-Yen Kao (Mathematics)

Project Title: Strong Localization of Eigenfunctions Induced by Clamped Points.

Project Description: Localization of eigenfunctions has been a fascinating subject in different vibrating systems including acoustics, mechanics, optics, and quantum physics. Roughly speaking, the effect of localization is a confinement of some eigenfunctions of an elliptic operator to a small portion of the whole domain in the presence of irregularities of the boundary or of the coefficients of the underlying operator. A few recent results explored the possibility of creating a strong location of eigenfunctions of biharmonic operators by clamping a point or a few points without study how the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions change with respect to the change of locations of these clamped points. In this project, we aim to study how to find the optimal locations of clamped points to achieve the extremal objective functions which depend on eigenvalues and eigenfunctions.

Qualifications: Students need to have completed ordinary differential equation (Math 111 or equivalent) and a programing course. Priority will be given to students who have learnt numerical analysis (Math 165) or partial differential equations (Math 180). If interested, contact Prof. Chiu-Yen Kao, ckao@cmc.edu.

Advisor must approve of the application, including total number of weeks of full-time work (8 or 10 weeks between May 26 and July 31), as well as the work expectations and outcomes (e.g. lab reports blog posts, research paper/poster), before submission.

Supervised Student Research with Prof. Cathy Reed (Psychological Science/Neuroscience)

Project #1 Title: PURSUE (Preparing Undergraduates for Research in STEM-related fields Using Electrophysiology)

Project #1 Description: PURSUE is a collaborative initiative to facilitate the training of undergraduates in cognitive electrophysiology. Students will work with Prof. Reed to create and refine engaging, evidence-based educational materials for EEG/ERP course modules as well as analyze EEG/ERP data to be included in a large database. Interested students should contact Prof Reed (cathy.reed@cmc.edu).

Advisor must approve of the application, including total number of weeks of full-time work (8 weeks between May 28 and July 24), as well as the work expectations and outcomes (e.g. lab reports blog posts, research paper/poster), before submission.

Project #2 Title: Influence of autistic tendencies on EEG correlates of body movement perception

Project #2 Description: From jumping jacks to jumping for joy, the “body language” of human movement provides important information about the intentions and emotions of others. Growing evidence suggests that we understand others’ mental states by internally recreating, or simulating, their external actions. This process may be altered in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a neurodevelopmental condition associated with social perception impairments. This research will use electroencephalography (EEG) to examine brain activity associated with action simulation during observation of emotional body movements in neurotypical and ASD populations. You should be detail-oriented, effective at working as part of a team, and willing/able to interact with typically developing individuals and individuals with ASD from the local community.

Advisor must approve of the application, including total number of weeks of full-time work (8 weeks between May 28 and July 24), as well as the work expectations and outcomes (e.g. lab reports blog posts, research paper/poster), before submission.

Supervised Student Research with Prof. Mark Huber (Statistics)

Project Title: Analyzing the effectiveness of robust estimators for Monte Carlo data

Project Description: Robust estimators give a guarantee on performance despite knowing very little about the distribution of the data being used. In this project students will implement in R a simulation, and then use data from the simulation to infer parameters of interest. The goal will be to understand the effectiveness of robust estimators, and compare to more traditional approximate estimators such as those given by the Central Limit Theorem.

Qualifications: Students ideally will have had Probability (Math 151) or the equivalent and have taken one or more advanced courses in either statistics or stochastic processes.

Advisor must approve of the application, including total number of weeks of full-time work (8 or 10 weeks between May 26 – July 31), as well as the work expectations and outcomes (e.g., check-ins, lab reports, research paper/poster), before submission.

Supervised Student Research with Prof. Alison Harris (Psychology)

Project Title: Influence of autistic tendencies on EEG correlates of body movement perception

Project Description: From jumping jacks to jumping for joy, the “body language” of human movement provides important information about the intentions and emotions of others. Growing evidence suggests that we understand others’ mental states by internally recreating, or simulating, their external actions. This process may be altered in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a neurodevelopmental condition associated with social perception impairments. This research will use electroencephalography (EEG) to examine brain activity associated with action simulation during observation of emotional body movements in neurotypical and ASD populations. You should be detail-oriented, effective at working as part of a team, and willing/able to interact with typically developing individuals and individuals with ASD from the local community.

Advisor must approve of the application, including total number of weeks of full-time work (8 or 10 weeks between May 26 – July 31), as well as the work expectations and outcomes (e.g., check-ins, lab reports, research paper/poster), before submission.

Supervised Student Research with William Lincoln (Robert Day School)

Project #1 Description William Lincoln (Robert Day School) is interested in offering a summer research opportunity in international economics and political economy. This project will involve empirical firm level research on contemporary issues. Applying students should have an interest in the use of quantitative methods for studying social science problems, although prior experience is not required and students from any major or program of study at CMC are welcome to apply. Preferred project length is 10 weeks. For further information, contact wlincoln@cmc.edu.

Advisor must approve of the application, including total number of weeks of full-time work (8 or 10 weeks between May 26 – July 31), as well as the work expectations and outcomes (e.g., check-ins, lab reports, research paper/poster), before submission.

Project #2 Description William Lincoln (Robert Day School) is willing to supervise an independent project for the summer research program in the area of Economics broadly defined. Students with project proposals in mind should contact wlincoln@cmc.edu in advance of sending an application in through https://www.cmc.edu/summer-research. Students need only be interested in Economics; students from any major or program of study at CMC are welcome to inquire.

Advisor must approve of the application, including total number of weeks of full-time work (8 or 10 weeks between May 26 – July 31), as well as the work expectations and outcomes (e.g., check-ins, lab reports, research paper/poster), before submission.

Supervised Student Research with Lisa Koch (Government)

Project Title: The International Politics of Regional Missile Defense - Strategy and Data

Project Description: Several countries around the world have regional missile defense (RMD) systems. Despite the investment of vast resources in RMD, and high levels of public belief in RMD’s protective capabilities, evidence indicates that the system in Israel, known as Iron Dome, has only a fair to poor record of intercepting real-world enemy rockets and missiles. What are the implications of governmental and public beliefs about RMD? How might RMD affect strategic behavior? We will collect and analyze data on RMD systems around the world, and on the real-world use of Israel’s RMD systems. We’ll also research political behavior during the recent conflicts in which Israel has operated RMD.

Advisor must approve of the application, including total number of weeks of full-time work (8 or 10 weeks between May 26 – July 31), as well as the work expectations and outcomes (e.g., check-ins, lab reports, research paper/poster), before submission.