Cameron Shelton, Ph.D.

McMahon Family Associate Professor of Political Economy

Department

Robert Day School of Economics and Finance

Areas of Expertise

Political Economy

Biography

Professor Shelton received his PhD in Political Economy from the Stanford Graduate School of Business in 2005. He arrived at CMC in 2008. His research interests focus on empirical political economy. He currently teaches a senior tutorial in economics as part of the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics program and an upper division course in political economy.  

Awards and Affiliations

Wicksell Prize, 2007

Co-founder: Suited, Inc.

Research Fellow, Inland Empire Economic Council

Director, Lowe Institute of Political Economy

Associate Editor: Public Finance Review

Research and Publications

"Gerrymandering in State Legislatures: Frictions from Axiomatic Bargaining" (with Hisam Sabouni) American Economic Journal: Economic Policy (2022) 14(4): 1-25.

"State Legislative redistricting: The Effectiveness of Traditional Districting Principles in the 2010 Wave." (with Hisam Sabouni) (2021) Election Law Journal 20.2:198-214.

"Policy Uncertainty and Manufacturing Investment: Evidence from U.S. State Elections" (with Nathan Falk) American Economic Journal: Economic Policy (2018) 10(4): 135-152.

"Congress and the Federal Reserve" (with Gregory Hess) Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, (2016), 48(4), 603-633.

"Legislative Electoral Budget Cycles" Public Choice, (2014), 159(1), 251-275.

"The Vicious Cycle: Fundraising and Perceived Viability in US Presidential Primaries" (with James Feigenbaum) Quarterly Journal of Political Science (2012) 7: 1-40.

"The Information Content of Elections and Varieties of the Partisan Political Business Cycle" Public Choice (2012) 150(1-2) 209-240

"Elections and Political Risk: New Evidence from Political Prediction Markets in Taiwan" (with Masami Imai) Journal of Public Economics (2011), 95(7-8) 837-849

"The Aging Population and the Size of the Welfare State: Is There A Puzzle?" Journal of Public Economics (2008), 92(3-4) 647-651.

"The Size and Composition of Government Expenditure" Journal of Public Economics (2007), 91 (11) 2230-2260.