Marian Miner Cook
Athenaeum

A distinctive
feature of social and
cultural life at CMC

Speakers, Spring 2015

 

Thursday,
January 22
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

William Kristol, founder and editor of The Weekly Standard, contributor to ABC News, author, and chief of staff to former U.S. Vice President Qualye, is widely recognized as one of the nation's most insightful political analysts. Chair of CMC's Salvatori Center advisory board, Kristol will offer his reflections on the current domestic political scene and prospects. "The Current Political Scene in the United States" (12:00 p.m. program)

Thursday,
January 22
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Peter Middleton, professor of English at the University of Southampton (U.K.), author of Distant Reading: Performance, Readership, and Consumption in Contemporary Poetry (2005) and Aftermath (2003) will speak on post-war American poetry and science. Middleton’s talk is based on his upcoming book in which he explores the influence of post-war science and epistemic values on the poetry of the American avant-garde during the 1970s. "New Metal: American Poetry and Science 1945-1970"(12:00 p.m. program Parents Dining Room)

Tuesday,
January 27

Paul Henderson, legal analyst, commentator, and former prosecutor, now serves as deputy chief of staff & public safety director for the city of San Francisco. As CMC's 2015 Martin Luther King commemorative speaker, Henderson will address race and justice in America and discuss recent events and legal decisions that have attracted national notoriety and caused significant national social unrest. "A Legal Perspective on Race, Civil Rights, and Social Justice"

Wednesday,
January 28
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Jaime Ayala P'16, founder and CEO of Hybrid Social Solutions and Chairman of Stiftung Solarenergie – Solar Energy Foundation (Philippines), was awarded the Schwab Foundation Social Entrepreneur of the Year 2013 and Ernst & Young Entrepreneur and Social Entrepreneur of the Year 2012 (Philippines). His social businesses and philanthropic initiatives include providing off-grid villages with sustainable access to solar energy. "Scaling Social Business to Save the World" (12:00 p.m. program)

Wednesday,
January 28

Fan Yu is the Gordon C. Bjork Professor of Financial Economics and a George R. Roberts Fellow at CMC. Yu's research (funded by Moody's and FDIC) on credit and operational risk has appeared in top journals such as the Journal of Finance, the Journal of Financial Economics, the Review of Financial Studies, the Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, and Mathematical Finance. "The Economics of the CDS (Credit Default Swap) Market"

Thursday,
January 29

Stephen Cambone is the founder of Adirondack Advisors, LLC, which provides strategic advice to companies. He has had a distinguished career in both the private and public sectors including in the Bush Administration he served as the second ranking Department of Defense policy official and as the first Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence. Cambone’s presentation will examine China’s ambitions in the world as expressed by its leaders, explore the domestic and foreign circumstances that may affect the realization of those ambitions, and anticipate a range of possible outcomes. "Anticipating History: How Well Can China Control Its Destiny?"

Monday,
February 2

Richard Sander is an economist and law professor at UCLA’s School of Law. A scholar on race and higher education, his 2004 Stanford Law Review article examining law school affirmative action calls into question the benefits of affirmative action for minority law students and is one of the most widely read law review articles written. "Affirmative Action and the Dilemmas of Race in 2015"

Wednesday,
February 4

Paul Lim associate professor at Vanderbilt University is an award-winning historian of reformation and post-reformation Europe. His latest book, Mystery Unveiled: The Crisis of the Trinity in Early Modern England (Oxford, 2012), won the 2013 Roland H. Bainton Prize for history/theology. He is currently writing about the transformation of global evangelical attitudes and efforts to eradicate human trafficking and structural poverty "Global Evangelicalism and Human Trafficking: Tyranny of the Urgent"

Thursday,
February 5

Michael Barone, senior political analyst for the Washington Examiner, longtime contributor to Fox News, and resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, frequently comments and writes about immigration and the structures of American electoral politics. He is the author of Hard America, Soft America: Competition vs. Coddling and the Competition for the Nation's Future (2004) and The New Americans: How the Melting Pot Can Work Again (2001). "American Politics 2015: Looking Forward"

Friday,
February 6
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

David Orr is counselor to the president at Oberlin College and the Stephen Minter Fellow at the Cleveland Foundation. Active in environmental, greening and sustainability movements, Mr. Orr is the author of seven books and co-editor of three others including Ecological Literacy (1992), Earth in Mind (1994/2004) and Hope is an Imperative: The Essential David Orr (Island Press, 2010). "Hot Careers in a Warming World" (12:00 p.m. program)

Monday,
February 9

Margaret Stock is an attorney and 2013 recipient of a MacArthur Foundation fellowship (“genius award”) who speaks widely on issues of immigration law and national security. With experiences serving in the U.S. Army Reserve and teaching at West Point, Stock challenges complex federal immigration laws in order to provide more humane and rational policies that will also serve American national security interests. "Exploiting the Myths, Traps, and Absurdities of Immigration Law to Benefit U.S. National Security"

Tuesday,
February 10
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

John (Jack) Werren is the Nathaniel and Helen Wisch Professor of Biology at the University of Rochester. A recipient of the Humboldt Prize (Germany) and fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he is an expert in genetics and evolution. With nearly 200 publications, he investigates diverse topics including evolution of new species, developmental genetics, microbial-host interactions, and the role of "selfish DNA" and genetic conflict in evolution. "Influential Passengers: Microbes that Manipulate their Hosts" (12:00 p.m. program)

Tuesday,
February 10
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Avraham (Alan) Rosen is an author and Holocaust scholar. He has taught widely in Israel and the United States, and lectures regularly at Yad Vashem’s International School for Holocaust Studies. His current book includes a monograph entitled, Killing Time, Saving Time: Calendars and the Holocaust. "Tracking Jewish Time in Auschwitz" (12:00 p.m. program Parents Dining Room)

Tuesday,
February 10

Diana Selig is the Kingsley Croul Associate Professor of History and George R. Roberts Fellow. A historian of the modern United States, she is the author of Americans All: The Cultural Gifts Movement. Her research interests include race and ethnicity, immigration, gender and women’s history, education, and social science. "Cultural Pluralism and Women's Suffrage in Twentieth Century America"

Wednesday,
February 11
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

A. Dirk Moses, professor of Global and Colonial History at the European University Institute, has written widely on genocide in colonial contexts including in his book, Empire, Colony, Genocide: Conquest, Occupation and Subaltern Resistance in World History (2008) among many others. He is currently researching a project on The Diplomacy of Genocide and is senior editor of the Journal of Genocide Research. "The Diplomacy of Genocide: Humanitarian Intervention in the Age of Decolonization" (12:00 p.m. program)

Wednesday,
February 11

Jonathan Rosenberg '83 P'14, currently an advisor to Google CEO Larry Page, joined Google in 2002 and managed the design and development of the company’s consumer, advertiser, and partner products, including Search, Ads, Gmail, Android, Apps, and Chrome. He is a co-author (with Google’s Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt) of How Google Works: The Rules for Success in the Internet Century.

Thursday,
February 12

Randall Kroszner is the Norman R. Bobins Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business. As a governor of the U.S. Federal Reserve System from 2006 to 2009, he chaired several Fed committees and played a leading role in developing responses to the financial crisis. A prolific writer, Kroszner is co-author with Nobel laureate Robert J. Shiller of Reforming U.S. Financial Markets: Reflections Before and Beyond Dodd-Frank (2011). "Lessons from the Financial Crisis of 2008: Are We Safer Today?"

Friday,
February 13
Lunch
11:45 a.m.

Don Gould, president and Chief Investment Officer, Gould Asset Management; "2015 Claremont Finance Conference: A Discussion of Investing with Don Gould" (12:15 p.m. program)

Friday,
February 13
Dinner
5:15 p.m.

Shaw Wagener '81, chairman, Capital International, Inc.; "2015 Claremont Finance Conference: Longer Term Perspectives of Market Tops and Bottoms Providing Context to Emerging Markets Today" (6:00 p.m. program)

Monday,
February 16

Christopher Conway is the author of the forthcoming Nineteenth-Century Latin America: A Cultural History (2015), and The Cult of Bolívar in Latin American Literature (2003), among numerous other publications. He is also a private collector of vintage Mexican comics, and is currently preparing to curate an exhibit of his large collection for the Central Library at The University of Texas at Arlington, where he chairs the Department of Modern Languages and is Associate Professor of Spanish. "Blood and Ink: A Comic Book History of Mexico"

Tuesday,
February 17

Richard Clarke, is CEO of Good Harbor Security Risk Management, which advises companies and governments on cyber security. He served for 30 years in the U.S. government, holding such positions as Special Advisor to the President for Cyberspace and National Coordinator for Security and Counter-terrorism. Clarke is the author of six books, including Sting of the Drone and Against All Enemies; "Cybersecurity in 2015: From Theft to Destruction"

Wednesday,
February 18

Valorie Thomas is an associate professor of English and Africana Studies at Pomona College and the Athenaeum's Black History Month speaker for 2015. A literary and cultural studies and black studies scholar, Thomas’s work focuses on African Diaspora Vertigo; she also teaches courses on African American literature, black feminist writers and activism, African Diaspora cinema, the prison-industrial complex, and contemporary Native American/First Nations/Indigenous literature. Her book manuscript titled, "Diasporic Vertigo: Memory, Space and Charting the Future in African Diaspora Arts" will be forthcoming.

Thursday,
February 19

Claire Thomas '07 is a food enthusiast turned creative blogger and author. A self taught chef, Thomas is the founder of the food blog thekitchykitchen.com and author of the book The KitchyKitchen: New Classics for Living Deliciously. A creative chef, she also works as a commercial director, food photographer, and host of ABC's Food for Thought. "Turning Your Blog Into A Brand"

Friday,
February 20
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Azure Antoinette is a poet, spoken word artist, and youth and arts education advocate whose performance poetry explores the ways social media is reshaping humanity. In 2011, she founded an arts-in-education program that provides specialized workshops to motivate and educate teen girls on how spoken word, performance poetry, and social media can make an impact on the world. Azure Antoinette’s Athenaeum appearance is part of the sixth annual Women and Leadership Workshop. "Creativity, Courage, and Using Your Voice" (12:00 p.m. program)

Monday,
February 23

James Joseph is emeritus professor of the Practice of Public Policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University. Joseph has had a distinguished career in business, education and civil society and has served in senior executive or advisory positions to four U.S. Presidents, including appointments by President Jimmy Carter as Under Secretary of the Interior and President Bill Clinton as U.S. Ambassador to South Africa. "Building and Sustaining Community in a Divided Nation: What I Learned from Nelson Mandela"

Tuesday,
February 24
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Brian Cuban is a lawyer, public speaker, and an eating disorder survivor whose book Shattered Image: My Triumph Over Body Dysmorphic Disorder chronicles his first-hand experiences surviving eating disorders, drug addiction, and Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). Cuban speaks candidly about his recovery, childhood bullying, fat shaming, and breaking the male eating disorder stigma. "Step By Step: Turning Your Worst Moments Into Your Greatest Achievements" (12:00 p.m. program)

Tuesday,
February 24

Victor C. Shih is a political economist at the University of California at San Diego specializing in China. An expert in banking sector reform in China, Shih will examine, among other related questions, why despite being the second largest economy in the world, China already has some of the highest debt-GDP ratios in the world and the single highest ratio for all emerging market countries. A prolific author, Shih has a doctorate in government from Harvard University. "Chinese Debt: Is It Sustainable?"

Wednesday,
February 25
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Mona Prince, assistant professor of English literature at Suez University in Egypt, is an Egyptian novelist and literary translator. A political and women’s rights activist, Prince was a presidential hopeful following the Arab Spring. Her recent book, Revolution is My Name, is her memoir, as a revolutionary woman, of the first 18 days in Cairo’s Tahrir Square in 2011. Prince is the recipient of a Rescue Scholar Fellowship and is currently a visiting professor at Pitzer and Claremont McKenna Colleges. "The Role of Women, Youth, and Intellectuals in the Arab Spring" (12:00 p.m. program)

Wednesday,
February 25

Kevin Allred is a feminist author, speaker, and self-proclaimed “undoer of the status quo.” Creator of the popular course “Politicizing Beyoncé” at Rutgers University, Allred explores and investigates some of the ways Beyoncé Knowles recapitulates and redeploys black feminist teachings and activism through her music and career. "Politicizing Beyonce: Black Feminist Politics and Queen Bey"

Thursday,
February 26

Zerlina Maxwell, political analyst and contributing writer for ESSENCE Magazine and Mic.com, will discuss rape culture, its prevalence on college campuses, and the role college students can play to combat this trend. Highlighting the prevalence of rape culture in the national media, Maxwell will discuss how changes in education may be the most effective way to end sexual violence including "teaching men not to rape." "From Catcalling to Sexual Assault: How We Can All Work to End Gender-Based Violence"

Friday,
February 27
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Paul Vandeventer, President & CEO of Community Partners, Wendy Garen, President & CEO of the Ralph M. Parsons Foundation, and Chelina Odbert '99, Founder & Principal of Kounkuey Design Initiative, will discuss effective strategies to collaborate within the local community to make a larger impact. "SOURCE Nonprofit Panel: Celebrating Innovation and Collaboration"(12:00 p.m. program)

Monday,
March 2

Mignon Fogarty is the creator of Grammar Girl and the founder and managing director of Quick and Dirty Tips. A magazine writer, technical writer, and entrepreneur, Fogarty’s kicky, practical, and easy-to-remember advice about style and usage has won her fans across the globe. Her first book, Grammar Girl’s Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing, is a New York Times bestseller, and her weekly grammar podcasts have been downloaded twenty million times. "An Evening with Grammar Girl"

Tuesday,
March 3

Marcelo Suárez-Orozco is the Wasserman Dean & Distinguished Professor of Education?at UCLA’s Graduate School of Education and Information Sciences. A renowned administrator and prolific award-winning writer, his research primarily focuses on conceptual and empirical problems in the areas of cultural psychology and psychological anthropology with an emphasis on mass migration, globalization, and education. In 2012, he founded the Institute for Immigrant Children, Youth, and Families at UCLA, which he co-directs. "Globalization, Mass Migration and Inequality: Further Thoughts on Education in the Age of Vertigo"

Wednesday,
March 4
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Ari Elson of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, will present the results of research on molecules called protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPe) and address the significant impact of science and engineering in Israeli society, from the founding of the Technion in the early 20th century to the numerous innovations that have contributed to Israel becoming the “start-up” nation. "Science and Society in Israel" (12:00 p.m. program)

Wednesday,
March 4

Noah Feldman is the Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law at Harvard Law School where he teaches constitutional and international law. An expert on Islamic philosophy and law, he is the author of The Fall and Rise of the Islamic State (2008)and After Jihad: America and the Struggle for Islamic Democracy (2004), among others. In 2003, he served as senior constitutional advisor to the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq and subsequently advised members of the Iraqi Governing Council on the drafting of the Transitional Administrative Law. "The Geopolitics of the Middle East: Challenges, Risks, and Prospects"

Thursday,
March 5
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Laura Eise '08 is a cyber security consultant with Booz Allen Hamilton, where she works with leaders across multiple industries in aligning cyber security programs to manage risk and meet the needs of the business. She is the co-author of a proprietary maturity model, CyberM3, which is used across multiple industries to gauge the completeness and maturity of cyber security programs. Eise’s talk will explore potential cyber attacks and threats as the automobiles we drive become increasingly "connected." "How Cyber is Driving Change in the Automotive Industry" (12:00 p.m. program)

Thursday,
March 5

Jeff Hobbs is the author of The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man Who Left Newark for the Ivy League (2014). Based on Hobbs’s college roommate and friend, it is a heartfelt and riveting biography of the short life of a talented and charismatic young African-American man who escapes the slums of Newark for Yale University where he majors in molecular biophysics and biochemistry only to succumb to the dangers of the streets—and of one’s own nature—when he returns home after graduation. "The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man Who Left Newark for the Ivy League"

Monday,
March 9

Timothy Snyder is the Housum Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences. He is a renowned scholar and author of numerous books on modern Eastern Europe and the Holocaust, including Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin (2010). His forthcoming book, a history of the Holocaust entitled Black Earth, will be published in September 2015. "Russia and Ukraine, War and History"

Tuesday,
March 10
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Marci Shore is associate professor of History at Yale University where she teaches European cultural and intellectual history. She is the author of Caviar and Ashes: A Warsaw Generation's Life and Death in Marxism, 1918-1968, and The Taste of Ashes: The Afterlife of Totalitarianism in Eastern Europe. Currently she is at work on a book project titled Phenomenological Encounters: Scenes from Central Europe. "A Civilization that Needs Metaphysics': Existentialism and Dissent in Eastern Europe" (12:00 p.m. program)

Tuesday,
March 10

Boston Trio was founded in 1997 and quickly became one of the most exciting chamber ensembles prompting the Boston Globe to urge readers to “… to drop everything and go hear them.” Pianist Heng-Jin Park, violinist Irina Muresanu, and cellist Astrid Schween collectively teach at the Boston Conservatory, Harvard University, MIT, the New England Conservatory, and UMASS Amherst. "Boston Trio’s Classical and Modern Piano Repertoire"

Wednesday,
March 11
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Brian Parker is the director of education at The Taylor Hooton Foundation. The Foundation is solely dedicated to increasing education and awareness about the dangers of appearance and performance enhancing drugs (APEDs). Parker will offer a pragmatic view of APEDs and their popularity to improve not only athletic performance but increasingly also to enhance physical appearance. "Hoot’s Chalk Talk: A Pragmatic View of Appearance and Performance Enhancing Drugs" (12:00 p.m. program)

Wednesday,
March 11

Clifford Ando is David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor of Classics, History, and Law at the University of Chicago and a research fellow in the department of Biblical and Ancient Studies at the University of South Africa. His work has focused on the nature of empire, political theory, law, and religion in the Roman and post-Roman worlds. Ando is the author of many books and has been a visiting professor and fellow at universities around the world. "The Long Defeat of the Roman Empire"

Monday,
March 23
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Jean Yarbrough is professor of government and the Gary M. Pendy, Sr. Professor of Social Sciences at Bowdoin College. A recipient of two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, she teaches political philosophy and American political thought. Active on numerous editorial boards, Yarbrough also is the author of many books, including most recently Theodore Roosevelt and the American Political Tradition (2012), which won the Richard E. Neustadt Award in 2013 for the best book on the American presidency. "Theodore Roosevelt and the American Political Tradition" (12:00 p.m. program)

Monday,
March 23

Robert Ford is Senior Fellow at The Middle East Institute. A retired Foreign Service officer, he served as U.S. ambassador to Syria (2010-2014) and to Algeria (2006-2008). Shortly after the outbreak of Syria's civil war, Ford traveled to the city of Hama in a show of solidarity with Syrians protesting the rule of Bashar Al Assad. He subsequently worked closely with Syrian opposition forces and was instrumental in bringing them to the Geneva peace talks. "An Evening with Ambassador Robert Ford"

Tuesday,
March 24

Renowned Indian music artists Paul Livingstone, Vineet Vyas, and Pandit (‘Maestro’) Kanhaiya Lal Mishra will play solo and together on sitar, tabla, and sarangi a selection of Hindustani ragas and talas (melodic and rhythmic pieces). In this intimate, traditional concert, rasa — flavor — of the experience is created by musical improvisation within very disciplined structures. "An Evening of Indian Classical Music"

Wednesday,
March 25
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Diana Linden, art historian, is the author of The New Deal Murals of Ben Shahn: Jewish Identity in the American Scene (Wayne State University Press, forthcoming 2015). Linden will situate Shahn’s New Deal mural production within the context of broad themes in American history, including American-Jewish history. "Red, White, and Jew: The New Deal Murals of Ben Shahn" (12:00 p.m. program)

Wednesday,
March 25

Nimmi Gowrinathan is a visiting professor at the Colin Powell School at City College New Year. She is the director of the Politics of Sexual Violence Initiative, funded by the Novo Foundation. She was formerly a humanitarian director at Operation USA, a policy analyst and human rights researcher for the International Crisis Group and the Center for Humanitarian Dialogue, and the United Nations gender expert on Afghanistan. She is the creator of www.deviarchy.com. "Understanding The Female Fighter: Extreme Marginalization"

Thursday,
March 26
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Verlyn Klinkenborg, a writer and former editorial board member of The New York Times, has been praised for his NYT editorial series "The Rural Life," a collection of meditations on rural life and his farm in upstate New York. He teaches at Yale College and his most recent book, Several Short Sentences About Writing offers thoughtful and practical wisdom on the art and craft of writing. "The Writer at Work"(12:00 p.m. program)

Thursday,
March 26

Zachariah Mampilly is director of the Program in Africana Studies and associate professor of Political Science and International Studies at Vassar College. He is the author of Rebel Rulers: Insurgent Governance and Civilian Life during War, and with Adam Branch, Africa Uprising: Popular Protest and Political Change. He has published numerous articles and essays on African and South Asian politics and culture. In 2012/13, he was a Fulbright Visiting Faculty member at the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania. "Africa Uprising! Popular Protest and Political Change"

Monday,
March 30

Dinner Theater, "The Bold, The Young and the Murdered" by Don Zolidis (2011) (6:00 p.m.)

Tuesday,
March 31

Dinner Theater, "The Bold, The Young and the Murdered" by Don Zolidis (2011) (6:00 p.m.)

Wednesday,
April 1

Dinner Theater, "The Bold, The Young and the Murdered" by Don Zolidis (2011) (6:00 p.m.)

Friday,
April 3
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Kyle Theodore ’91 is a senior vice president at Pacific Investment Management Company (PIMCO) as an account manager on the DC key accounts team. With over 19 years of investment sector experience, he was previously at Valuemetrics, a valuation and transaction advisory services company, and the Walt Disney Company. Theodore majored in government and literature at CMC and has an MBA from Yale University. He will speak at the Athenaeum as a Robert Day School Distinguished Speaker. "PIMCO’s Current Economic Views, and Thoughts on Behavioral Finance" (12:00 p.m.)

Monday,
April 6
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Peter Gentala, counsel to the Arizona House of Representatives, and Mary O'Grady P'15, counsel to the Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission, will discuss the constitutional authority of independent redistricting commissions to draw congressional districts, and analyze the arguments before the Supreme Court in Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission. Christopher Skinnell '99, partner at Nielsen Merksamer Parrinello Gross and Leoni LLP will moderate; "Who Draws the Lines? Will the Supreme Court Strike Down Independent Redistricting Commissions?" (12:00 p.m. program)

Monday,
April 6

Jason Altmire served three terms as a United States congressman representing Pennsylvania’s 4th District. He currently serves as Florida Blue’s senior vice president of public policy and community engagement. Congressman Altmire will discuss changes in the health care delivery system and future innovations that will drive the national policy debate and next steps in health care reform. He will also address the upcoming Supreme Court decision on subsidies in the federal exchange, a key linchpin of the ACA law. "The Future of Health Care Post-Affordable Care Act"

Tuesday,
April 7

Larry Kramer is the president of The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation in Menlo Park.Before joining the Foundation, Kramer served as the Richard E. Lang Professor of Law and Dean of Stanford Law School. His teaching and scholarly interests include American legal history, constitutional law, federalism, separation of powers, the federal courts, conflict of laws, and civil procedure. Kramer is the author of numerous articles and books, including The People Themselves: Popular Constitutionalism and Judicial Review. "Compromise as the Core Constitutional Value"

Wednesday,
April 8
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Mark Penn P'15 is executive vice president and chief strategy officer at Microsoft Corporation. Responsible for working on core strategic issues across Microsoft’s products, he oversees an interdisciplinary strategy team and works with product and other teams across the company. Penn has been a senior advisor to many corporate and political leaders in the U.S. and abroad. He served as chief strategist to Hillary Clinton in her senate campaigns and her 2008 presidential bid; he was also the White House pollster to President Clinton. "New Microtrends: From Politics to Dating" (12:00 p.m. program)

Wednesday,
April 8

Ronald Grigor Suny is the Charles Tilly Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan. A renowned researcher and prolific author, Suny’s intellectual interests center on the non-Russian nationalities of the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union, particularly those of the South Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia). He is the author of Looking Toward Ararat: Armenia in Modern History, and the co-editor of A Question of Genocide: Armenians and Turks at the End of the Ottoman Empire. "They Can Live in the Desert But Nowhere Else: Explaining the Armenian Genocide One Hundred Years Later"

Thursday,
April 9

Jessica Tuchman Mathews is a distinguished fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace where she previously served as president for 18 years. Before her appointment in 1997, her rich and extensive career included posts in both the executive and legislative branches of government, in management and research in the nonprofit arena, and in journalism, environmental and science policy. "Can the U.S. Still Lead?"

Friday,
April 10
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Michael O'Hanlon is a senior fellow and co-director at the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence and director of research for the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution, where he specializes in U.S. defense strategy, the use of military force, and American foreign policy. His most recent book, co-written with James Steinberg, is Strategic Reassurance and Resolve: U.S-China Relations in the Twenty-First Century (2014). "The Obsolescence of Ground Power, The Rebalance to the Pacific, the Dominance of Drones, and Other Truths, Half-Truths, and Myths about the Future American Military" (12:00 p.m. program)

Monday,
April 13
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Fernando Fabre is president of Endeavor Global whose mission is to transform cities around the world by supporting local entrepreneurship. Tapped in 2002 by Mexican President Vicente Fox, Fabre helped develop a set of guidelines to build an entrepreneurial culture in Mexico, an effort that was heralded by the local press. He holds a master degree in economics from Claremont Graduate University and an MBA and B.A. in managerial economics from Universidad Anahuac del Sur. "High Impact Entrepreneurs in Emerging Economies" (12:00 p.m. program)

Monday,
April 13

Bernard Cooper, suburban '60s teenager, grew up confused about his sexuality, his consumer-oriented world, and the death of his older brother. He fell in love with Pop art and set off for the California Institute of the Arts, the epicenter of the burgeoning field of conceptual art. Author of several books, Cooper’s My Avant-Garde Education evokes the wonders and absurdities of a certain era in art history always aware that awakening to art is, especially for a young person, inseparable from awakening to the ever-shifting nature of the self. "My Avant-Garde Education: An Evening with Bernard Cooper"

Tuesday,
April 14
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Jonathan Macey, Sam Harris Professor of Corporate Law, Corporate Finance and Securities Law, Yale University; author, Macey on Corporation Laws (1998), and co-author, Corporations: Including Partnerships and Limited Liability Companies (2003); "From Bankers Trust to Goldman Sachs: The Demise of Market Discipline for Breaches of Trust" (12:00 p.m. program)

Wednesday,
April 15

Arn Chorn-Pond, founder of Cambodian Living Arts, is a Cambodian-American refugee and the subject of the critically acclaimed book, Never Fall Down. Born into a family of performers and musicians, Chorn-Pond escaped death in a Khmer Rouge work camp by playing his flute for the camp’s guards. He is an internationally recognized human rights leader, speaker, and trainer and currently resides in Cambodia, where he continues to be chief advocate of Cambodian Living Arts "Child of War, Man of Peace"

Thursday,
April 16
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

The potential value of the Internet of Things (IoT) has been estimated in the trillions of dollars. However, missing from the vast estimates are specifics about how businesses can tap into those trillions to create - and ultimately realize - actual revenue and value-add benefits from an Internet connectivity strategy. Panelists Darin Anderson ’87 and Mayumi Matsuno ’01 will discuss the opportunities for improving our world via the IoT without completely surrendering our privacy and data security. Stephen Siegel ’87 will moderate. "Internet of Things: Rewards and Risks" (12:00 p.m. program)

Thursday,
April 16

Campbell Grey is an associate professor of classical studies at the University of Pennsylvania. A social historian, he has written extensively on how small communities worked in the late and post-Roman world. He co-directs the Roman Peasant Project, a multidisciplinary investigation into the life ways of peasants in southern Tuscany during the Roman period. His work increasingly focuses on the complex, dialectical relations between human populations and their living environments. "Climate, the Environment, and the Transformation of Agriculture In Late Antique Europe: New Answers or New Questions?"

Monday,
April 20

Michael S. Greve is a faculty member at George Mason University School of Law, where he teaches constitutional law. He was previously a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and also the founder and co-director of the Center for Individual Rights. A prolific writer, Greve is the author of nine books and many other publications. He has an M.A. and a Ph.D. from Cornell University. "The Rise of Executive Federalism"

Wednesday,
April 22

Jeremy Lim '16 is a 3 plus 2 CMC junior studying economics and engineering; he will head to Columbia in the fall for his engineering studies. He attained his diploma in piano performance from the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music in 2008, and has been pursuing piano studies at Scripps under the mentorship of Hao Huang, professor and chair of music. Lim has also performed at numerous student recitals organized by the Scripps College Department of Music. This concert will feature a selection of solo piano works including pieces by Bach, Chopin, Rachmaninov, and Ravel.

Thursday,
April 23
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Linda Rottenberg, co-founder and CEO of Endeavor, the 2015 recipient of the Henry R. Kravis Prize in Nonprofit Leadership, will accept the award on behalf of the organization. Endeavor’s mission is to catalyze long-term, global economic growth by selecting, mentoring, and accelerating promising high-impact entrepreneurs in emerging and growth markets around the world. "Endeavor-2015 Henry R. Kravis Prize in Nonprofit Leadership" (12:00 p.m. program)

Tuesday,
April 28
Lunch
11:30 a.m.

Ruth Weisberg, artist, professor of fine arts, former dean at the Roski School of Art and Design at USC, is the director of the USC Initiative for Israeli Arts and Humanities. Weisberg’s work is included in 60 major museums, among them the Metropolitan Museum, the Whitney, the National Gallery and the Art Institute of Chicago. She is the recipient of numerous awards, most recently the Foundation for Jewish Culture’s 50th Anniversary Award (2011), and the Southern Graphic Council International’s Printmaker Emeritus Award (2015). "Contemporary Trends in Israeli Art" (12:00 p.m. program Parents Dining Room)

Monday,
May 4

J. Bradford DeLong is a professor of economics at U.C. Berkeley, a research associate at the NBER, and—to his surprise—a weblogger at WCEG, INET, and Medium. He also served as deputy assistant secretary of the Treasury from 1993-1995. At Cal, he teaches economic history, macroeconomics, and a little finance; and tries to think also about how economic research, economic communication, and economic debate are evolving in the information age. "The Great Depression and the Great Recession in the North Atlantic"
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