Marian Miner Cook
Athenaeum

A distinctive
feature of social and
cultural life at CMC

Open Events

Welcome to the registration page for all open events at the Athenaeum for the Spring 2018.

​Please note that this registration page is the only recognized mechanism for signing up for meals associated with Athenaeum events. Alternative registrations provided by third parties (such as Eventbrite) are not managed or controlled by the College, and unfortunately such registrations cannot be honored to allow dining with us in advance of the talk. 

Events generally open for registration on a rolling basis every two weeks over the course of the semester. The CMC community has priority for dinner reservations. Space permitting, when meal spots are available for members of the other Claremont Colleges, a note is added to the event listing and registration is open for all others. 

Unless otherwise noted, the talk itself is free and open to all, and no reservations are required to attend the talk only. Seating for only the talk itself is on a first-come basis.

Please click "Sign Up" under individual events to sign up for open events. If there is no button showing, the registration is currently closed either because the event is full or the reservation window has passed. Please check back later or contact the Ath at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

Unless otherwise noted, lunch begins at 11:45 a.m; speaker presentations begin at 12:15 p.m. Evening programs typically begin with a reception at 5:30 p.m.; dinner is served at 6 p.m; and the talk begins at 6:45 p.m. Reservations are required for all meals.

An explanation of the reservation process and a list of frequently asked questions is available. Additional questions may also be directed to the Ath at athenaeum@cmc.edu.

Monday, February 26, 2018 - 5:30pm
Combatting Corruption—An IMF Perspective
Sean Hagan P'20
​Corruption is a universal challenge. Corruption undermines economic development, sows distrust in democratic institutions, deepens inequality, and corrodes civil society. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has taken a strong position in combatting corruption. What drives corruption?  Why does corruption matter?  What are the economic costs of corruption? Which anti-corruption strategies are the most effective? And what is the most effective role for the IMF to perform (or refrain from) in anti-corruption reform? In this moderated discussion with CMC President Hiram Chodosh, Sean Hagan P'20, general counsel and director of the legal department at the IMF, will address these and other major questions confronting the IMF in its sustained reform efforts.

Sean Hagan P'20 is general counsel and director of the legal department at the International Monetary Fund. In this capacity, Hagan advises the Fund’s management, executive board, and membership on all legal aspects of the Fund’s operations, including its regulatory, advisory and lending functions. Hagan has published extensively on both the law of the Fund and a broad range of legal issues relating to the prevention and resolution of financial crisis, with a particular emphasis on insolvency and the restructuring of debt, including sovereign debt.

Prior to his tenure at the IMF, Hagan was in private practice, first in New York and subsequently in Tokyo. He received his Juris Doctor from the Georgetown University Law Center and also received a Masters of Science in International Political Economy from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Meal reservations now open to everyone in The Claremont Colleges.
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 5:30pm
The Complicated South
Garrard Conley
The son of a Baptist preacher, memoirist and author of Boy Erased, Garrard Conley grew up gay in rural Arkansas. His experience attending an “ex-gay” conversion therapy facility, followed by years of strained relationships with his family, led him to a unique and complicated understanding of the American South. Through interviews with family members, former “ex-gay” therapists, psychologists, and advocates, Conley will share new insights he has developed into what it means to be Southern in the 21st century.

Coming of age as the son of a Baptist pastor in rural Arkansas, Garrard Conley was terrified and conflicted by his sexuality; he had never even met another gay person. At age nineteen, his worst fear came true when he was outed to his parents. They gave him an ultimatum: he could either be shipped to a “conversion therapy” facility in a hope to “cure” him of his homosexuality, or he would lose his family, his friends, and his God. He chose the facility, a decision that would lead him through a brutally institutional Twelve-Step Program. He was supposed to emerge cleansed of impure urges, stronger in his Christian faith, and—most importantly—heterosexual. Instead, Conley developed the strength to search for his true identity and to forgive his family.

Conley’s bestselling memoir, Boy Erased, traces the complex relationships between identity, faith, and community. A humane, poetic glimpse at a world hidden to many, Conley shows all sides of his family—good and bad—with courage and compassion, even as he depicts his own story of survival.

Boy Erased thrust Conley onto the national stage as the public gained increasing awareness of conversion therapy facilities. It is currently being adapted as a film by Focus Features with Joel Edgerton directing. A popular speaker, he lectures at schools and venues across the country on radical compassion, writing through trauma, and what it means to grow up gay in the South. He has received scholarships from the Bread Loaf, Sewanee, and Elizabeth Kostova Foundation Writers’ Conferences and has facilitated classes for Catapult, Sackett Street Writers Workshop, and the Fine Arts Works Center in Provincetown. He is also currently the memoir instructor for GrubStreet’s Memoir Incubator program. His work can be found in TIME, VICE, CNN, BuzzFeed, Virginia Quarterly Review, and The Huffington Post, among other places, and he was recently named a Lambda Award Finalist for memoir/autobiography. 

Photo credit: Colin Boyd Shafer

Meal reservations are at capacity for this event. If you would like to be put on a waiting list, please contact the Athenaeum.
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 5:30pm
A Plan To Promote Equity Across Our Region
Marianne Haver Hill
Marianne Haver Hill, executive director of Propel LA, the countywide strategic plan for economic development housed at the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation, will discuss  is the implementation of this ambitious consensus-developed plan which involves more than 500 stakeholder groups and is designed to promote greater equity across the region, as well as more prosperity for all area residents through improved education and workforce development, job creation, and livable communities.

Marianne Haver Hill supervises a team that works with more than 500 stakeholder groups in the implementation of Propel LA which includes seven large goals around investing in people and workforce development, promoting trade and industry clusters, accelerating innovation, creating a business-friendly environment, supporting infrastructure development, enhancing global connectedness, and supporting livable communities.

Previously, Hill served from 1987 - 2016 as the President and CEO of MEND—Meet Each Need with Dignity, the largest and most comprehensive poverty relief agency in the San Fernando Valley. Under her leadership, MEND grew from serving an average of 2,000 needy clients each month to helping an average of 37,000 applicants monthly, utilizing a volunteer work force of more than 5,000 and a staff team of 34 individuals. In July 2012, MEND was named the California Nonprofit of the Year by the Governor’s Office for Volunteering and Service. 

Hill is the recipient of the 2017 Valley Economic Alliance Valley of the Stars Leadership Award, the 2013 Center for Nonprofit Management Leadership Impact Award, the 2008 California Association of Nonprofits Excellence in Leadership Award, and several other commendations. She has been an adjunct instructor in nonprofit management at the USC Price School of Public Policy.

 

Meal reservations now open to everyone in The Claremont Colleges.
Thursday, March 1, 2018 - 11:45am
“They” and the Emotional Weight of Words
B. Cole
As a graduate student at the London School of Economics, B. Cole, founder of The Brown Boi Project, cobbled together stories, interviews, and research on how gender identity, and expression become language that makes us visible in the world. Given the current debate about using gender-neutral pronouns, they will address how language is the space in which we carve a place for ourselves, where we demand to be seen and is also a reflection point for culture, community, and family to acknowledge our existence on our terms.

B. Cole holds an MSc from the London School of Economics and has worked as a community facilitator and strategist for more than 15 years. Drawing on her experience as a consultant, Cole launched the Brown Boi Project in 2010. Cole introduced the term “masculine of center,” which is now being used to forward understanding of the incredible breadth of masculinity within the queer community. A Black Male Achievement Echoing Green Fellow, Rotary International Ambassadorial Scholar, and recipient of the Spirit of Delores Huerta Award, Cole has worked across the U.S. and internationally on issues of leadership development and building social capital for young people of color.

B. Cole's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Center for Writing and Public Discourse, the Kravis Leadership Institute, and Gender and Sexuality Studies. 

Thursday, March 1, 2018 - 5:30pm
Monsters to Destroy
Ben Tumin
"Monsters to Destroy” is a multimedia performance by filmmaker and comedian Ben Tumin (Pomona 2012) discussing refugee resettlement in the United States.

Ben Tumin is a filmmaker and comedian born, raised, and based in New York. He worked at Amnesty International in Morocco and the community building platform Meetup before forging an independent career in political comedy and filmmaking. His work has been featured in The Daily Beast, Al Jazeera, and The Brian Lehrer Show (WNYC). Tumin is a 2012 graduate of Pomona College where he majored in history.

Mixing information about the refugee crisis with clips from interviews conducted with Scott Cooper, a retired marine working in human rights advocacy, and five young Syrians living in Germany, Tumin takes a different look at the impact of refugee resettlement, particularly from the perspective of national security. Through anecdotes about his grandfather — himself once a refugee — Tumin weaves in his connection to the cause and pieces together what he has learned about himself, his country, and the questions that remain.

Mr. Tumin's talk is co-sponsored by the Mgrublian Center for Human Rights at CMC.

Meal reservations are at capacity for this event. If you would like to be put on a waiting list, please contact the Athenaeum.
Thursday, March 1, 2018 - 5:30pm
How We Rise: Strategies for Social Innovation
Cheryl L. Dorsey
For more than 30 years Echoing Green, a global organization seeding and unleashing next-generation talent, has identified, cultivated, and invested deeply in emerging leaders to accelerate their impact on transforming the world through economic development, racial and gender equity, environmental sustainability, and more. Today, Echoing Green talent consists of 700+ innovators who have launched Teach For America, City Year, One Acre Fund, SKS Microfinance, Public Allies, and more. Cheryl Dorsey, president and CEO of Echoing Green, will demonstrate how through responsible leadership, businesses can promote a brighter future for all. 

Cheryl L. Dorsey is the president of Echoing Green, a global organization seeding and unleashing next-generation talent to solve the world’s biggest problems. Prior to leading this social impact organization, Dorsey was herself a social entrepreneur and received an Echoing Green Fellowship in 1992 to help launch The Family Van, a community-based mobile health unit in Boston. She later became the first Echoing Green Fellow to head the social venture fund in 2002. 

An accomplished leader and entrepreneur, she has served in two presidential administrations as a White House Fellow and special assistant to the U.S. Secretary of Labor (1997-98); special assistant to the director of the Women's Bureau of the U.S. Labor Department (1998-99); and vice-chair for the President's Commission on White House Fellowships (2009-16). Dorsey serves on several boards including the SEED Foundation, The Bridgespan Group, and, previously, the Harvard Board of Overseers.

A magna cum laude graduate of Harvard-Radcliffe Colleges, Dorsey received a medical degree from Harvard Medical School and a Master’s in Public Policy from Harvard's Kennedy School. 

Ms. Dorsey will deliver the opening keynote address for the  2018 Kravis-de Roulet (KDR) Conference. 

Meal reservations now open to everyone in The Claremont Colleges.
Friday, March 2, 2018 - 5:30pm
“That Person in the Mirror”: Leveraging YOUR Time, Talents, and Assets to Make a Difference
Judy Belk
In the keynote address for the 1st Annual Women of Color Power and Purpose Forum, Judy Belk, president and CEO of The California Wellness Foundation (Cal Wellness), will share reflections on how her personal journey has been shaped by deeply held values and how informed choices have helped advance her career in the public and private sectors, including as the current leader of one of California’s largest health philanthropies. She will share examples from her own experience that point to ways “You” can make a difference. To register for the Women of Color Power and Purpose Forum, please visit the online registration page.

Judy Belk, is president and CEO of The California Wellness Foundation (Cal Wellness), a private independent foundation created in 1992 with a mission to improve the health of the people of California by making grants for health promotion, wellness education, and disease prevention. A seasoned leader with more than 25 years of senior management experience in philanthropic, government, nonprofit, and corporate sectors, Belk is a frequent writer and speaker on organizational ethics, race and social change, and her work has been recognized with several state and national awards.

Belk's pieces have aired on National Public Radio and appeared in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. In her day job as president and CEO of Cal Wellness, she leads the Foundation in pursuing its mission to improve the health of the people of California. Belk uses her vision and her voice to help Cal Wellness “level the playing field” so that everyone has access to good-paying jobs, safe neighborhoods, and quality health care services.

Before joining Cal Wellness in April of 2014, she served as senior vice president of Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, a position she held since 2002. Belk has been inspired and humbled with two Hedgebrook residences in 2000 and 2013.

Ms. Belk will deliver the keynote address for the first annual Women of Color, Power, and Purpose Forum sponsored by the Berger Institute, CARE Center, and the Kravis Leadership Institute, with additional support from Global Slack and is part of the "Behind the Veil: Women, Race, Leadership, and Social Change in the Nonprofit Sector” (“BTV”) speaker series. BTV explores leadership models and perspectives by harnessing the power of first-person narrative and storytelling by nonprofit CEOs on the front lines of social change.   

Reservations for this event are being handled by the event sponsor via link above.
Monday, March 5, 2018 - 5:30pm
American Conservatism at a Crossroads
David Frum
Under Donald Trump, American conservatism increasingly presents itself as authoritarian and ethnically chauvinist. How has this happened? Why? Are hopes dead for a conservatism that is democratic, responsible, and inclusive? David Frum, a former staffer to President George W. Bush, senior editor at The Atlantic, and author of the NYT bestseller Trumpocracy  will offer a vision of a better future for the American center-right.

David J. Frum is a Canadian-American neoconservative political commentator. A speechwriter for President George W. Bush, Frum later became the author of the first "insider" book about the Bush presidency. He is a senior editor at The Atlantic and also a CNN contributor. 

Over the years, Frum has worked for Canadian publications as well as American ones, including the National Review and the Wall Street Journal. He worked at the American Enterprise Institute after leaving the Bush White House, and also counseled Rudy Giuliani on his presidential bid. 

​Frum received his B.A. and M.A. from Yale University in 1982. He graduated cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1987, where he served as president of the Federalist Society. His first book, Dead Right, was published in 1994 and was hailed by the conservative right as an important piece of ideological literature for the conservative movement.

Mr. Frum's Athenaeum talk is co-sponsored by the President's Leadership Fund.

Tuesday, March 6, 2018 - 5:30pm
The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Jewish Discourse: Identity, Justice, and Religion
Tal Becker
Behind the leaders and negotiators in any conflict are the societies they represent. While most discussions about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict tend to focus on the policy issues in dispute, an unspoken but no less important dimension is the way in which the conflict is viewed and experienced within each community and in the context of its own self-understanding. Tal Becker, senior fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem, will review the nature of Jewish discourse with respect to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, both within and outside Israel, to illuminate the values, ideas, historical references, and narratives that shape this debate and offer a deeper perspective on the conflict and the challenges and opportunities associated with addressing it. 

Tal Becker, Ph.D., is a senior fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem where he leads educational initiatives on Israel and the Jewish world. In this capacity, he is a leading member of the Institute's "Engaging Israel" series which is the premier educational program on Israel engagement in North America that is working to strengthen and re-imagine the relationship between Israel and World Jewry. 

Becker also serves as the Legal Adviser of the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and has been a senior member of the Israeli peace negotiation team in successive rounds of peace negotiations. He has many years of experience as a veteran negotiator on the front lines of many of Israel's most pressing diplomatic, legal, and policy challenges and has also played key roles in behind the scenes for Israel in a wide variety of contexts. 

Among numerous previous positions, Becker has been a senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, senior policy advisor to Israel's Minister of Foreign Affairs, a lead negotiator and drafter in the Annapolis peace talks, director of the International Law Department at the Israeli Foreign Ministry, counsel to Israel's UN Mission in New York, and an international law expert for the Israel Defense Forces. 

Becker earned his doctorate from Columbia University and, among numerous scholarly awards, is the winner of the Rabin Peace Prize and the 2007 Guggenheim Prize for best international law book for his book "Terrorism and the State.”

Dr. Becker's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the President's Leadership Fund and the Jewish Studies Sequence at CMC.

Wednesday, March 7, 2018 - 5:30pm
Divorce without Separation? Reimagining the Two-State Solution and Middle East Peace
Omar Dajani
The vision of "two states for two peoples" has guided efforts to resolve the Palestinian-Israeli conflict for decades. Omar Dajani, professor of law at McGeorge School of Law and former legal adviser to the Palestinian negotiating team in the peace talks with Israel, will reflect on whether there are any good alternatives and whether it is possible to achieve peace in the Holy Land without separating the peoples who call it home. 

Omar M. Dajani is professor of law and co-director of the Global Center at the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law, in Sacramento, California, where he teaches public international law, constitutional law, contracts, international negotiations, and other courses.

Dajani has written extensively about legal questions raised by the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and about how law functions in the context of efforts to resolve it. Previously, he served as legal adviser to the Palestinian negotiating team in peace talks with Israel (1999-2001) and as a political officer in the Office of the UN Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process (UNSCO). He has continued since that time to work as a consultant on a variety of legal infrastructure development and conflict resolution projects in the Middle East and elsewhere – for institutions including the U.S. Department of State, the Norwegian Peacebuilding Resource Center (NOREF), the Center for Humanitarian Dialogue, and the European Council on Foreign Relations.

Dajani received his J.D. from Yale Law School and his B.A. from Northwestern University.

Mr. Dajani's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the President's Leadership Fund and the Jewish Studies Sequence at CMC and part of the "Peace in the Middle East" series.

Monday, March 19, 2018 - 5:30pm
Coptic Orthodox Christians in the Middle East
Bishop Kyrillos
His Grace Bishop Kyrillos, the first American-born bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church, will provide a historical overview of the Coptic Orthodox Church and examine the modern challenges faced by this historic Christian community in the Middle East.

His Grace Bishop Kyrillos (formerly Fr. John Paul Abdelsayed) is the first American-born bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Communication Studies from UCLA and a Juris Doctor degree from the Georgetown University Law Center. He also earned two Masters degrees in Theology from Holy Cross Orthodox School of Theology in Boston, and a Ph.D in History of Christianity from the University of Notre Dame, School of Theology, in Indiana.

After serving as a consecrated deacon at the Coptic Orthodox Christian Center from 2000-2002, he was ordained as a celibate priest for St. Paul Brotherhood on October 20, 2002. He served at St. Mina Coptic Orthodox Church in Riverside for several years. On March 14, 2016, His Eminence Metropolitan Serapion elevated him to the priestly dignity of Hegumen. On Thomas Sunday, May 8, 2016, he was tonsured a monk by His Grace Bishop Sarabamon at the Monastery of Abba Antony in Yermo, California. His Holiness Pope Tawadros II consecrated him as an auxiliary (general) bishop to serve alongside His Eminence Metropolitan Serapion in the Diocese on Sunday, June 12, 2016 at the Cathedral of the Holy Virgin Mary in Zeitoun, Egypt.

He currently oversees Christian education in the Diocese and serves as Dean of the St. Athanasius and St. Cyril Theological School at Claremont University.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 5:30pm
Is the Problem of Freedom of Speech Soluble?
Michael Zuckert
Freedom of speech, especially on campuses, is again a subject of intense discussion and debate. Complicating the discord, according to Michael Zuckert, professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, is that the accepted doctrines of free speech have undergone many transformations and several varieties of speech doctrine now coexist—and often conflict—each claiming allegiance to a distinctive conception of free speech. Zuckert will address the development of the different speech doctrines by considering political and philosophic reasons as well as the implications associated with the different versions of free speech doctrine.

Michael Zuckert is the Nancy R. Dreux Professor of Political Science at University of Notre Dame. Before that, he was Kenan Professor of Political Science at Carleton College. His main scholarly work has been in the areas of early modern political philosophy, and constitutional law and history; he has written widely in these areas. His books include Natural Rights and the New Republicanism, The Natural Rights Republic, Launching Liberalism, and Leo Strauss and the Problem of Political Philosophy. He is now completing a book titled A Nation so Conceived: Abraham Lincoln and the Problem of Democratic Sovereignty.

Professor Zuckert's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Rose Institute for State and Local Government at CMC.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - 5:30pm
Reform Contradictions Facing China's New Leadership
Yukon Huang
Drawing on his book, Cracking the China Conundrum—Why Conventional Economic Wisdom Is Wrong, Yukon Huang, senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment, will highlight the reform challenges facing China's new leadership. These include options for dealing with China’s debt problems, sustaining rapid growth, curtailing corruption, moderating trade and investment tensions with the West and coping with pressures for political liberalization. Huang will argue that many of the mainstream assumptions for addressing these issues are misguided and often lead to flawed policy prescriptions.

Yukon Huang is currently a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment in Washington D.C. He was formerly the World Bank’s Country Director for China.

Huang's research focuses on China’s economy and its regional and global impact. Huang has published widely on development issues in professional journals and the public media. He is a featured commentator for the Financial Times on China and his articles are seen frequently in the Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Foreign Affairs, National Interest and Caixin. His recent books include East Asia Visions, Reshaping Economic Geography in East Asia and International Migration, and Development in East Asia and the Pacific. His latest book Cracking the China Conundrum: Why Conventional Economic Is Wisdom Is Wrong was published by Oxford University Press (2017).

Huang earned his Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University and holds a B.A. from Yale University.

Dr. Huang's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies at CMC.

Thursday, March 22, 2018 - 5:30pm
The Rise and Fall of a Tribal Species: Why America and its Universities are Malfunctioning
Jonathan Haidt
The human mind is finely tuned for tribal conflict. America’s founders knew this and designed a system that would reduce the damage done by factionalism. We had a great run. But now a variety of social, technological, and intellectual trends are amplifying our tribal tendencies, with alarming implications for the future. Jonathan Haidt, social psychologist at the New York University, will use moral psychology to analyze recent trends in politics, and in university life and recommend reforms that might help adapt our universities and our politics to an age of polarization and perpetual outrage.    

Jonathan Haidt is a social psychologist whose research focuses on morality—its emotional foundations, cultural variations, and developmental course. He began his career studying the negative moral emotions, such as disgust, shame, and vengeance, but then moved on to the understudied positive moral emotions, such as admiration, awe, and moral elevation.

Haidt is the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University’s Stern School of Business. He received his B. A. from Yale University in 1985 and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1992. After post-doctoral research at the University of Chicago and in Orissa, India, he was a professor at the University of Virginia from 1995 until 2011, when he joined the Stern School of Business.

He is the co-developer of Moral Foundations Theory, and of the research site YourMorals.org. He uses his research to help people understand and respect the moral motives of people with whom they disagree. He won three teaching awards from the University of Virginia and one from the governor of Virginia. His four TED talks—on political psychology, on religion, on the causes of America’s political polarization, and on how America can heal after the bitter 2016 election—have been viewed more than 6 million times. 

Haidt was named a “top 100 global thinker” in 2012 by Foreign Policy magazine, and one of the 65 “World Thinkers of 2013” by Prospect magazine. He is the author of more than 90 academic articles and two books: The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom, and The New York Times bestseller The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion.

Professor Haidt's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the President's Leadership Fund.

Photo credit: Philip Howard

Friday, March 23, 2018 - 11:45am
Innovation Dilemma: Access and Innovation in an age of Curative Therapies
Amitabh Chandra
Science discoveries along with generous incentives for producing new medical innovations have created a raft of high-priced therapies. Their presence strains the ability of payers to provide access, especially when there has been little income growth for a large share of the population, and when tax-revenues are projected to fall substantially in coming decades. These pressures will be exacerbated as the world sees the first-wave of curative therapies for monogenic diseases like cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Amitabh Chandra, professor of social policy and director of health policy research at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, will discuss these tradeoffs and offer polices to address them.­­­

Amitabh Chandra is the Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy and Director of Health Policy Research at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He teaches undergraduates in Harvard College, graduate students at the Kennedy School and Harvard Business School, and in Harvard's executive education programs.

Chandra is a member of the Congressional Budget Office's (CBO) Panel of Health Advisors, and is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). His research focuses on innovation and cost-growth in healthcare, medical malpractice, and racial disparities in healthcare. His research has been supported by the National Institute of Aging, the National Institute of Child Health and Development, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and has been published in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and Health Affairs. He is the chair editor of the Review of Economics and Statistics.

Chandra has testified to the United States Senate and the United States Commission on Civil Rights. His research has been featured in the New York Times, the Washington Post, CNN, Newsweek, and on National Public Radio. He has been a consultant to the RAND Corporation, Microsoft Research, the Institute of Medicine and the Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation of Massachusetts. In 2011, he served as Massachusetts' Special Commissioner on provider price reform.

Chandra is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, the first-prize recipient of the Upjohn Institute's Dissertation Award, the Kenneth Arrow Award for best paper in health economics, and the Eugene Garfield Award for the impact of medical research. In 2012, he was awarded American Society of Health Economists (ASHE) medal. The ASHE Medal is awarded biennially to the economist age 40 or under who has made the most significant contributions to the field of health economics.

Professor Chandra’s Athenaeum presentation is the keynote for the 2018 Southern California Conference in Applied Microeconomics (SoCCAM), hosted by the Lowe Institute of Political Economy at CMC.

 

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Unless otherwise noted, lunch begins at 11:45 a.m.; speaker presentations begin at 12:15 p.m.
Evening receptions begin at 5:30 p.m.; dinner is served at 6 p.m.; speaker presentations begin at 6:45 p.m.