Faculty

Prof. Cathy Reed

Cathy Reed, the McElwee Family Professor of Psychology and George R. Roberts Fellow Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, will share a $600,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to improve the teaching of cognitive neuroscience at undergraduate institutions. Reed will share the money with two colleagues from the University of Richmond and Hampshire College.

Screen shot from AARP advertisement

The Huffington Post reports that an AARP campaign about Social Security is upsetting liberal retirement security advocates “because it focused on getting politicians to propose any detailed plan ― and didn’t distinguish between reform proposals that would cut benefits and those that would not.”

Prof. Aseema Sinha

Government Prof. Aseema Sinha's research on the intersection between India and the United States received a significant boost this year when it received a Fulbright award.

The Fulbright-Nehru Academic and Professional Excellence Award will support Professor Sinha's research into the roles non-state actors such as business people, students, diaspora communities, and others play in two “estranged democracies” becoming strategic partners.

Prof. Ronald Riggio

Ronald Riggio, Henry R. Kravis Professor of Leadership and Organizational Psychology at CMC, continues to build upon a research project that provides invaluable insight into long-term linkages between early childhood development, leadership, and success.

The research project, “Early Life Predictors of Adult Success,” is supported by a $50,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

China’s Crony Capitalism book cover

Prof. Minxin Pei's new book, China’s Crony Capitalism: The Dynamics of Regime Decay (Harvard University Press) received a positive review in The Economist.

Clinton Trump caricatures

It's easy to believe that we are doomed to choose between the lessor of two evils when picking our political leaders.

Ronald Riggio, the Henry R. Kravis Professor of Leadership and Organizational Psychology, explains some of the reasons fueling that perception in a Psychology Today column.

“Sadly, we have only ourselves (and the political system we support) to blame,” Riggio writes. “Our perceptual biases, our human tendencies, and the way campaigns are run all combine to affect both who we choose as leaders, and how we perceive them.”

Pages