Silicon Valley Program

Course Descriptions

The Silicon Valley Program consists of four courses in an off-campus residential setting taught by Claremont McKenna faculty. Please note that SVP courses are changing for the Fall 2016 semester. 

Students from the other Claremont Colleges should consult with their respective Registrars’ office and/or department chair for more detailed information.
 


FALL 2016


ECON 65 CM / ECON 165 CM -- Innovation Management / Industrial Organization

This cross-listed course can be taken as a level 1 economics course (that requires only ECON 050 CM “Principles of Economics” or equivalent) or a level 2 economics course (that requires ECON 101 CM “Intermediate Microeconomics” or equivalent); the difference between the two lies in the exams. The course material focuses on several insights for prospective innovators in firms and other organizations. We discuss the main sources of competitive advantage, describe several stylized facts about innovation, consider how innovations are generated and diffuse, and describe how high-tech firms and industries evolve. We also discuss the role of public policy and the key elements of regional and national innovation systems. Throughout the course our focus is on how appropriate management combined with an understanding of surrounding circumstances can help firms generate innovations and appropriate returns.

Prerequisite: ECON 50 CM or equivalent for ECON 65 CM / ECON 101 CM or equivalent for ECON 165 CM
Instructor: Filson, D
Major Credit: CMC ECON = 1.0 Level 1 elective for ECON 65 CM / CMC ECON 1.0 Level 2 elective for ECON 165 CM
Sequence Credit: ECON 165 CM = 1 CMC Financial Economics elective
Graduation Credit: 5Cs = 1.0
Graded or Credit / No Credit: Letter Grade


SV 100 CM -- Leadership, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley

This course provides an overview of leadership, innovation, and entrepreneurship theories and constructs, with applications and implications for leading in innovative and cutting-edge organizations in Silicon Valley.  Topics will range from the history of Silicon Valley, to leading creative teams, to entrepreneurial start-ups, and the leadership skills necessary to foster innovative organizations.  A central theme will be to equip students with the knowledge and skills to be effective leaders in innovative organizations.

Prerequisite: None
Instructor: co-taught by Conger, J and Riggio, R
Major Credit: None
Sequence Credit: CMC Leadership capstone course
Graduation Credit: 5Cs = 1.0
Graded or Credit / No Credit: Letter Grade


ECON 98 CM / 198 CM -- Organizing for Innovation / Economics of Innovation

This cross-listed course can be taken as a level 1 economics course (that requires only ECON 050 CM “Principles of Economics” or equivalent) or a level 2 economics course (requires ECON 101 CM “Intermediate Microeconomics” or equivalent). This course considers how organizational structures, processes and practices impact an organization’s ability to generate innovations and appropriate returns. The material considers the impacts of firm decisions, public policies and the surrounding environment on the nature and amount of the innovations generated and the impacts those innovations have on subsequent firm behavior and market outcomes. The course content and tasks are designed to interact with the internship. The focus is on innovation in firms, but many of the insights apply to all types of organizations. 

Prerequisite: None
Instructor: Filson, D
Major Credit: CMC ECON = 1.0 Level 1 elective for ECON 98 CM / CMC ECON 1.0 Level 2 elective for ECON 198 CM
Sequence Credit: CMC Leadership breadth course
Graduation Credit: CMC = 1.0; POM = 1.0
Graded or Credit / No Credit: Letter Grade


INT 030 CM -- Silicon Valley Program Internship

Taken as part of the Silicon Valley Program, students gain experience in an innovative organization by securing an internship in consultation with the program director. This experience complements the other coursework in the program to enhance the student’s understanding of the strategies and practices of innovative organizations, firm-level innovation ecosystems, high-tech markets and the regional system of innovation in Silicon Valley and the surrounding area.

Prerequisite: None
Instructor: Filson, D
Major Credit: None
Sequence Credit: CMC Leadership experiential course
Graduation Credit: CMC = 1.0; POM = None; PIT = None; SCR = 1.0
Graded or Credit / No Credit: Letter Grade


SPRING 2016

ECON 123 CM – Quantitative Data Analysis

The course will give students an introduction to advanced data analysis. The main objective of the course is to allow students to apply statistical concepts to large data sets using both spread sheet software and statistical packages. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring programming skills within these programs. There will be an emphasis on real life applications both from data source publicly available and from companies in the Silicon Valley, addressing both public policy questions and topics related to internships.

Prerequisite: ECON 101 CM or ECON 102 CM
Instructor: Keil, M
ECON Credit: CMC = 1.0 Level 2
Graduation Credit: CMC = 1.0, POM = 0.0; See Pomona ECON Chair
Graded or Credit / No Credit: Letter Grade


ECON 165 CM -- Industrial Organization 

Industrial Organization uses economics to study industries and firms. We will explain why imperfect competition is pervasive, discuss how to describe and compare imperfectly competitive industries and firms, consider alternative strategies firms employ, examine how industries evolve over time, evaluate the implications for profitability and welfare, and assess the impacts of public policies on firm strategy and industry performance. The insights are particularly useful for prospective consultants and entrepreneurs, and prospective investors, managers, and policy makers will benefit from the course as well.

Prerequisite: ECON 101 CM or equivalent
Instructor: Filson, D
ECON Credit: CMC = 1.0 Level 2
Graduation Credit: CMC = 1.0, POM = 1.0
Graded or Credit / No Credit: Letter Grade


ECON 198 CM -- Organizing for Innovation 

This course guides the student through several topics related to organizing for innovation. The material considers how organizational structures, processes, and practices impact an organization's ability to generate innovations and appropriate returns. Links between the course content and the internship are developed. The focus is on innovation in firms, but many of the insights apply to all types of organizations. 

Some students will be required to seek academic supervision from a faculty member at his/her home campus. This course satisfies the breadth requirement of the leadership sequence at CMC.

Prerequisite: None
Instructor: Filson, D
ECON Credit: CMC = 1.0 Level 1 Elective 
Graduation Credit: CMC = 1.0 Level
Graded or Credit / No Credit: Letter Grade
Additional Information: Pomona College Notes


ECON 030 CM -- Internship in Economics, Technology, or Innovation

Taken as part of Silicon Valley Program off-campus internship programs. Students gain experience in a technology, business, or innovative setting through placement arranged with the program director.

Prerequisite: None
Instructor: Filson, D
ECON Credit: CMC = None; POM = None
Graduation Credit: CMC = 1.0; POM = None
Graded or Credit / No Credit: Letter Grade
Additional Information:  Pomona College Notes