Marian Miner Cook
Athenaeum

A distinctive
feature of social and
cultural life at CMC

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Thursday, October 11, 2018 - Lunch Program
GeNtry!fication: OR THE SCENE OF THE CRIME
Chaun Webster

Poet and graphic designer Chaun Webster draws from an interest in the work of sign in graffiti, the layering of collage, and the visuality of text. These methods are used in Webster’s work to investigate race—specifically the instability of blackness and black subjectivities, geography, memory, and the body. Webster will discuss how these investigations engage the question of absence and how to archive what is missing from the landscape as neighborhoods once populated with familiar presences, dissolve in real time.  

 

Chaun Webster is a poet, publisher and graphic designer whose poetry finds its influences in the intersections of the Black Arts Movement and Jazz, the Concrete Poetry Tradition and Grafitti. Webster’s first book, Gentry!fication: or the scene of the crime, was published in April 2018 by Noemi Press. 

Mr. Webster's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Center for Writing and Public Discourse, the CARE Center, and the Gould Center for Humanistic Studies, all at CMC.

Thursday, October 11, 2018 - Evening Program
How to walk 2000 miles
Liz Thomas '07

With a mix of storytelling, how-to tips, and gear show-and-tell, record-holding hiker and award-winning author Liz Thomas ’07 shares lessons from 17,000 miles in the mountains. Honoring the 50th anniversary of the National Trails Act, she explores the legacy and the future of trails, conservation, and outdoor recreation in America.

Liz Thomas ’07 is a professional hiker, adventure conservationist, and outdoor writer who held the women’s unsupported speed record on the 2,181-mile long Appalachian Trail. A guest editor and regular contributor to Backpacker Magazine, Thomas has been featured on Good Morning America and has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Yahoo!News, Men's Journal, Women's Health, Outside, among other publications. Her book Long Trails: Mastering the Art of the Thru-Hikereceived the 2017 National Outdoor Book Award for Best Instructional book. Thomas serves as the vice president of the American Long Distance Hiking Association and ambassador to American Hiking Society. A former staff writer at Wirecutter/New York Times, Thomas is a currently editor in chief at Treeline Review, an outdoor web magazine and is writing a guidebook to Southern California waterfall hikes.

A 2007 graduate of Claremont McKenna College where she majored in EEP (Environment, Economics, and Politics) and was the Athenaeum student manager, Thomas holds a masters in Environmental Science from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, where she held a Doris Duke Conservation Fellowship for her research on trails, conservation, and trail-side communities. She currently is on the board of the Robert Environmental Center at CMC.

Since graduating from CMC, Thomas has hiked over 17,000 miles on more than 20 long distance hiking paths around the world!


Food for Thought: Podcast with Elizabeth Thomas

Thursday, October 11, 2018 - Evening Program
Women in India: A ‘Progressive’ View from Bollywood—Screening and Discussion of QUEEN
Nita Kumar, moderator

QUEEN, directed by Vikas Bahl, is a commentary on the mores of Indian middle-class families who assume that girls will be shy, get married, be happy ever after. That is until the marriage part falls apart. While awarded and loved by critics and audience alike, some scholars read this movie as a comment on the continuous restrictive—and for feminists, frustrating— appropriation of the public sphere in South Asia as unavoidably masculine. Moreover, they find it lamentable that the protagonist Rani has to go to Europe to find herself after her almost marriage.

A much-awarded Hindi movie of 2014 including best story, actress, script, editing, in National and Filmfare awards, QUEEN is the story about an ordinary girl from New Delhi who, left by her fiancé on the eve of her wedding, decides to console herself by going alone on their planned honeymoon to Paris and Amsterdam. Then we, the audience, gets instruction on how to imagine her future. She holds her own with interesting people and learns a lesson at every step. A familiar-seeming story of the girl-next-door, Rani, played by Kangna Ranaut, charms and entertains in unexpected ways while understating the most important message possible, “Be yourself.” 

Movie screening will begin promptly at 5:30 pm.

(Freeberg Dining Room)

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