Marian Miner Cook
Athenaeum

A distinctive
feature of social and
cultural life at CMC

Monday, February 10, 2020

Monday, February 10, 2020 - Lunch Program
The Future of Work
Stacie Yee '99, Arjun Lall '07, and Faye Sahai '90

The “Future of Work” event is a panel discussion that brings together leaders across sectors to discuss the ever-evolving workplace. With the growing adoption of advanced technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence), as well as the increased emphasis on a fluid, de-centralized workforce, the nature of the workplace, workforce, and perhaps even the nature of work itself will be changing significantly in the near future. Arjun Lall ’07, Faye Sahai ’90, and Stacie Yee ’99 will explore these topics in a moderated panel discussion, and share their thoughts on the future of work. This panel discussion is a production of the 20/20 in 2020 theme for the CMC research institutes, and is made possible through the collaborative efforts of the Berger Institute and the Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship.

 

The “Future of Work” event is a panel discussion that brings together leaders across sectors to discuss the ever-evolving workplace. With the growing adoption of advanced technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence), as well as the increased emphasis on a fluid, de-centralized workforce, the nature of the workplace, workforce, and perhaps even the nature of work itself will be changing significantly in the near future. Arjun Lall ’07, Faye Sahai ’90, and Stacie Yee ’99 will explore these topics in a moderated panel discussion, and share their thoughts on the future of work. This panel discussion is a production of the 20/20 in 2020 theme for the CMC research institutes, and is made possible through the collaborative efforts of the Berger Institute and the Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship.

 

Monday, February 10, 2020 - Evening Program
How and Why Public Schools are (Still) Divided by Race
Nikole Hannah-Jones

Nikole Hannah-Jones, a New York Times investigative journalist, MacArthur Award recipient, and lead-writer for The 1619 Project, has written extensively on the history of racism, school re-segregation, and the disarray of hundreds of desegregation orders. Her deeply personal account—which became the basis of a New York Times feature piece—of her own experience as a parent in New York City's public school system shows that school segregation is not an isolated phenomenon but rather a defining factor of most cities across the country.

Nikole Hannah-Jones is an award-winning investigative reporter who covers civil rights and racial injustice for The New York Times Magazine. Hannah-Jones got hooked on journalism when she joined her high school newspaper and began writing about students, who just like her, were bused across town as part of a voluntary school desegregation program.

Prior to joining the Times, Hannah-Jones worked as an investigative reporter at ProPublica in New York City, where she spent three years chronicling the way official policy created and maintains segration in housing and schools. Before that, she reported for the largest daily newspaper in the Pacific Northwest, The Oregonian, in Portland, Oregon, where she covered numerous beats, including demographics, the census, and county government. She started her journalism career covering the majority-black Durham Public Schools for The News & Observer in Raleigh, North Carolina.

A 2017 MacArthur Award recipient for her work in “reshaping national conversations around education reform,” Hannah-Jones received her B.A. from Notre Dame and an M.A. from the University of North Carolina.

Ms. Hannah-Jones will deliver the Gould Center for Humanistic Studies' 2020 Golo Mann Lecture.  

Photo credit: John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
 

Food for Thought: Podcast with Nikole Hannah-Jones

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