Marian Miner Cook
Athenaeum

A distinctive
feature of social and
cultural life at CMC

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Wednesday, March 25, 2020 - Lunch Program
Urgency in the Anthropocene
Amanda Lynch (EVENT POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE)

The narrative of the Anthropocene has been characterized by emergencies and exceptions from Australian bushfire to climate anxiety. Amanda Lynch, Lindemann Distinguished Professor of Environmental Studies at Brown University, will explore the interplay between our new state of urgency and the means by which that urgency is addressed. In so doing, she will seek to reframe the Anthropocene as an age of actual and emerging coexistence with earth system variability, encompassing both human dignity and environmental sustainability.

Amanda Lynch received her Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from the University of Melbourne in 1993, with a focus on polar climate modeling. Her current research focuses on environmental governance in adaptation to global change, with particular interests in Arctic ice retreat and local, indigenous and practitioner knowledge. She developed the first Arctic regional climate system model in 1993. She is a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society, the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering, the Norwegian Scientific Academy for Polar Research, and the World Academy of Art and Science. She is an associate editor of the AAAS journal Science Advances. At the United Nations World Meteorological Organization, she is a member of the Scientific Advisory Panel. Her most recent book is co-authored with human geographer Siri Veland and is entitled “Urgency in the Anthropocene” (MIT Press, 2018). 

Professor Lynch’s Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored the Claremont International Relations Society at CMC.

Wednesday, March 25, 2020 - Evening Program
Why Psychiatry Gave up on Freud and Embraced the Brain: What Really Happened and What Really Happened Next
Anne Harrington (EVENT POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE)

In the 1980s, American psychiatry underwent a rapid pivot away from previously dominant psychoanalytic and social science perspectives and instead embraced an approach focused on drugs, biology, and the brain. The standard understanding is that this happened because, after years of wandering lost in a Freudian desert, the field had finally gained some fundamental new biological understandings of mental illness. Anne Harrington, professor of the history of science, director of undergraduate studies, and faculty dean at Harvard University, refutes that standard understanding and instead urges the search for a new and better understanding of what really happened in the 1980s, not least because choices then have directly shaped the world of mental health care with which we all live today.  

Anne Harrington is the Franklin L. Ford Professor of the History of Science, director of undergraduate studies, and faculty dean (head of house) of Pforzheimer House at Harvard University, an undergraduate residential community of 375 undergraduates. She has written widely in the history of psychiatry, brain science, and medical practice, and is the author of four books, including "Reenchanted Science," "The Cure Within," and, most recently, “Mind Fixers: Psychiatry's Troubled Search for the Biology of Mental Illness (2019). Her courses are some of the most popular at Harvard University.

Professor Harrington's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored with funding from the Open Academy at CMC.

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