Marian Miner Cook
Athenaeum

A distinctive
feature of social and
cultural life at CMC

 

Current Semester Schedule

The Athenaeum’s spring 2021 virtual programming has concluded.

Speaker programming will resume in person at the Athenaeum on Monday, September 13, 2021, at 5:30 p.m.

We will update this page with speaker details shortly.

Tue, October 5, 2021
Dinner Program
Adam Jones

The controversies swirling around policies and inequities in a pandemic age provide an opening to explore the place of structural and institutional violence in comparative genocide studies. Adam Jones, a William F. Podlich Distinguished Fellow at CMC this fall, is a political scientist, writer, and photojournalist based at the University of British Columbia Okanagan. Utilizing his extensive scholarship on genocide and structural violence, Jones will propose analytical angles and empirical standards by which structural violence can be incorporated in a genocide framework, highlighting issue-areas related to Covid-19 that urgently require attention and intervention. 

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Adam Jones is a political scientist, writer, and photojournalist based at the University of British Columbia Okanagan. In the fall of 2021, Jones is a William F. Podlich Distinguished Fellow at CMC.  Jones is best known for his work in the field of comparative genocide studies and is the author or editor of numerous books on genocide and crimes against humanity including "Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction;" "The Scourge of Genocide: Essays and Reflection; Genocide, War Crimes and the West;" and "Gendercide and Genocide." He has also published two books on the media and political transition. His writings on gender and international politics have appeared in the Journal of Genocide Research, Review of International Studies, Ethnic & Racial Studies, Caribbean Studies, and other publications.

Throughout his career, Jones has developed a distinctive approach to the study of gender and international relations. In 1999, he co-founded the Web-based NGO Gendercide Watch with Carla Bergman and Nart Villeneuve, aimed at "confront[ing] gender-selective atrocities against men and women worldwide." He has also worked as an expert consultant with the United Nations Special Adviser on Genocide Prevention and the Responsibility to Protect. His essays on gender, violence, and international politics are compiled in "Gender Inclusive: Essays on Violence, Men, and Feminist International Relations" (Routledge, 2009). 

Jones was a postdoctoral fellow (2005-07) in the Genocide Studies Program at Yale University and earned his Ph.D. in political science from the University of British Columbia. 

Adam Jones' talk is co-sponsored  by the Mgrublian Center for Human Rights at CMC.

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Thu, October 7, 2021
Dinner Program
Steven Pinker

Progress is a demonstrable fact: We are healthier, richer, freer, safer, and happier than our ancestors. It’s not because of some mystical force that lifts our species upward. It’s because of the Enlightenment ideal of using knowledge to enhance well-being, and the institutions it created, including science, liberal democracy, commerce, and organizations for international cooperation. Will this progress continue, given the threats of pandemics, climate change, and authoritarian populism? No one knows for sure, but Steven Pinker, award- winning experimental psychologist and Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology at Harvard University, will offer ways to think about the challenges ahead.

As one of CMC’s 75th Anniversary Distinguished Speakers, Professor Pinker will highlight issues in “Civilization and Commerce,” one of the three academic collaboration themes of our special 75th Anniversary celebration.

Photo credit: Rose Lincoln, Harvard University

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Steven Pinker, award- winning experimental psychologist and Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology at Harvard, asks the big questions about human progress and sets out to answer them. A provocative speaker, much in demand, Pinker is a cognitive scientist who has been named by TIME as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World. His keynotes have helped millions demystify the science behind human language, thought, and action. A professor, a TED speaker, and a bestselling author, twice nominated for the Pulitzer Prize, he is highly respected in the scientific community, his work and opinions are extensively covered in the mainstream media, and he has won a wide general audience.

In his upcoming book, “Rationality: What It Is, Why It Seems Scarce, Why It Matters,” Pinker argues that we fail to take advantage of the most powerful tools of reasoning discovered by some of our best thinkers: Logic, critical thinking, probability, correlation and causation. Specifically he explores why—when humanity is reaching new heights of scientific reasoning—there appears to be more fake news, conspiracy theorizing, and medical quackery than ever before. Rejecting the cynicism that humans are inherently irrational, Pinker offers an insightful, hopeful analysis of what rationality really is, why it can feel like it’s scarce, and how we can use it to drive better choices in our personal lives and in the public sphere.

In his earlier book “Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress,” Pinker argued that, despite fear-mongering and political upheaval, the world is getting better: Peace, prosperity, knowledge and happiness are on the rise. "Enlightenment Now" was the follow-up to "The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Had Declined", which was a #1 Amazon bestseller. 

Pinker’s other bestselling books include “The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature" and “How The Mind Works.” Pinker’s acclaimed “language” series includes “The Language Instinct: How the Mind Creates Language,” “Words and Rules,” “The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature,” as well as “The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century.”

A native of Montreal, Pinker is Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. Previously, he taught at Stanford and at MIT. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has won several teaching prizes, and his research on visual cognition and the psychology of language has received numerous awards, including the Troland Award from the National Academy of Sciences.

 

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Tue, October 12, 2021
Dinner Program
Hagar Chemali

Drawing from her extensive professional and academic experiences in foreign relations, national security, and public affairs, Hagar Chemali, a political commentator with expertise on a range of historic and dynamic issues facing Syria, Lebanon, and other hot regions, will highlight and provide commentary on some of the most pressing and ever-evolving topics in the Middle East today. 

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Hagar Hajjar Chemali is a political satirist, foreign policy expert, and host, writer, and producer of a world news show on YouTube called “Oh My World!” She worked in the U.S. government for 12 years in a range of senior national security and public affairs positions. She is a political commentator and writer on national security issues, and is featured regularly on MSNBC, CNN, BBC, Bloomberg, and Cheddar. She is also CEO and Founder of Greenwich Media Strategies, and a nonresident senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Economic Sanctions Initiative.

 From 2015-2016, Chemali was director of communications and spokesperson for the U.S. Mission to the United Nations under President Obama. Prior to this position, she was spokesperson for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence at the U.S. Department of the Treasury where she handled all public affairs related to sanctions policy, illicit finance, and enforcement actions.  From 2010-2012, Chemali was director for Syria and Lebanon at the National Security Council at the White House, where she advised on and coordinated the implementation of U.S. policy toward Syria and Lebanon. Chemali also worked at the Treasury Department as a senior policy advisor on Asia and Middle East policy advisor in the Office of Terrorist Financing and Financial Crimes.

Chemali is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations and holds a Master of International Affairs from Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs where she concentrated in international security policy and the Middle East. She is also a graduate of Barnard College where she majored in political science and speaks English, French, Arabic and Italian.

Ms. Chemali's Athenaeum talk is supported by the Siam Family Foundation and co-sponsored by the Mgrublian Center for Human Rights at CMC.

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Thu, October 14, 2021
Dinner Program
Kathryn Stoner

Too often, we are told that Russia plays a weak hand well. But, perhaps the nation’s cards are better than we know. Russia ranks significantly behind the U.S. and China by traditional measures of power: GDP, population size, over-all health, and military might. Yet 25 years removed from its mid-1990s nadir following the collapse of the USSR, Russia has become a supremely disruptive force in world politics. Kathryn Stoner, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, professor of political science (by courtesy) at Stanford University, and incoming Mosbacher Director of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law assesses the resurrection of Russia and argues for looking beyond traditional measures of power to assess Russia’s strength in global affairs. Accounting for how Russian domestic politics under Vladimir Putin influences its foreign policy, Stoner explains how Russia has battled its way back to international prominence. 

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Kathryn Stoner is a Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and Professor of Political Science (by courtesy) at Stanford University. As of Sept. 15, 2021, she is the Mosbacher Director of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. She teaches in the department of political science at Stanford, and in the program on international relations, as well as in the Ford Dorsey Master's in International Policy Program. Prior to coming to Stanford in 2004, she was on the faculty at Princeton University for nine years, jointly appointed to the Department of Politics and the Princeton School for International and Public Affairs. 

In addition to many articles and book chapters on contemporary Russia, she is the author or co-editor of six books: "Transitions to Democracy: A Comparative Perspective," written and edited with Michael A. McFaul (Johns Hopkins 2013); "Autocracy and Democracy in the Post-Communist World," co-edited with Valerie Bunce and Michael A. McFaul (Cambridge, 2010); "Resisting the State: Reform and Retrenchment in Post-Soviet Russia" (Cambridge, 2006); "After the Collapse of Communism: Comparative Lessons of Transitions" (Cambridge, 2004), coedited with Michael McFaul; and "Local Heroes: The Political Economy of Russian Regional" Governance (Princeton, 1997). Her most recent book was published in 2021 entitled "Russia Resurrected: Its Power and Purpose in a New Global Order" (Oxford University Press). 

She received a B.A. (1988) and M.A. (1989) in political science from the University of Toronto, and a Ph.D. in government from Harvard University (1995). In 2016 she was awarded an honorary doctorate from Iliad State University, Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia.

Professor Stoner's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies at CMC.

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Wed, October 20, 2021
Dinner Program
Alex Vitale and Peter Moskos, panelists; Michael Fortner, moderator

The debate on policing has generated heated discussions and strong reactions nationwide. Questions like: Are cops detrimental to the welfare of racial minorities? Should we defund them? Or perhaps abolish them? What about police reform? To discuss these and other related questions are Peter Moskos and Alex Vitale, two of the nation’s most prominent experts on policing. A defender of policing, Moskos is a professor at CUNY’s John Jay College of Criminal Justice and author of Cop in the Hood. A proponent of abolitionism, Vitale is a professor of sociology at Brooklyn College and author of The End of Policing.The debate will be moderated by Michael Fortner, an associate professor of government at CMC.  

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Peter Moskos is a professor in the department of Law, Police Science, and Criminal Justice Administration at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City. A Princeton undergraduate, he received his Ph.D. from Harvard in sociology. He is the director of John Jay College’s NYPD Executive Master’s Program and  is a former Baltimore City Police Officer. In addition to his primary position at John Jay College, Moskos is a faculty member in CUNY’s doctoral program in sociology, has taught introductory criminal justice classes at LaGuardia Community College in Queens, and is a Senior Fellow of the Yale Urban Ethnography Project. He is the founder of the Violence Reduction Project.

Alex S. Vitale is professor of sociology and coordinator of the Policing and Social Justice Project. He has spent the last 25 years writing about policing and consults both police departments and human rights organizations internationally. He is the author of City of Disorder: How the Quality of Life Campaign Transformed New York Politics and The End of Policing. He is also a frequent essayist, whose writings have appeared in The New York TimesThe NationNY Daily News, and USA Today.

 

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Thu, October 21, 2021
Dinner Program
Ian Ona Johnson '09

Immediately after World War I and continuing for more than a decade, the German military and the Soviet Union—despite having been mortal enemies—entered into a secret partnership designed to overturn the order in Europe. Centering on covert economic and military cooperation, their arrangement led to the establishment of a network of military bases and industrial facilities on Soviet soil. Through this alliance, Germany gained the space to rebuild its army. In return, the Soviet Union received vital military, technological, and economic assistance. Though Hitler ended their partnership in late 1933, he and Stalin would renew it in 1939. The result was the German - and then Soviet - invasion of Poland. Drawing from twenty archives in five countries, including new collections of declassified Russian documents, Ian Ona Johnson ’09, professor of history at Notre Dame University, offers the definitive exploration of a shadowy but fateful alliance that led to the outbreak of the Second World War.

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Ian Johnson ‘09 is the P.J. Moran Assistant Professor of Military History at the University of Notre Dame. A historian of war, diplomacy, and technology, his research focuses on the origins and conduct of war, and the maintenance of peace. His first monograph, The Faustian Bargain: Secret Soviet-German Military Cooperation in the Interwar Period was published in 2021 by Oxford University Press. He has also edited the memoirs of a Russian veteran and revolutionary for publication, “The White Nights: Pages from a Russian Doctor’s Notebook.” He is currently working on a new manuscript exploring the military history of the early Cold War, with a focus on collective security and plans for an international military force.

Johnson received his Ph.D. from the Ohio State University in 2016, with a dissertation that explored secret military cooperation between the Soviet Union and Germany in the interwar period. During graduate school, he was the recipient of a Fulbright-Hays Fellowship, as well as the OSU Presidential Fellowship. He graduated in 2009 from CMC where he studied history and government.  

From 2015-2016, Johnson was a predoctoral fellow with International Security Studies at Yale University. Thereafter, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Clements Center for National Security and a lecturer in the department of history at the University of Texas at Austin. In 2017, he returned to Yale University as the Associate Director of the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy and lecturer in the department of history.

 Johnson’s writing has also appeared in the National Interest, the Claremont Review of Books, the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, the Global Military Studies Review, the Journal of Global War Studies, Technology and Culture, and the Journal of Slavic Military Studies, among others.

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Mon, October 25, 2021
Dinner Program
Michael Steele

To paraphrase Friedrich Nietzsche, madness is rare in individuals—but in political parties it is the rule. From the very founding of our American political system, we have been less than sane when it comes to our politics and political parties. But what makes the madness different today? And why does it feel so personal? How does political activism and the rise of grassroots movements such as Tea Party, Occupy Wall Street, and even “Trumpism” impact policymakers or even create a pathway for a “third way” as the dominant political parties try to hold on to voters and rebrand themselves? Michael Steele, former chairman of the Republican National Committee (RNC), doesn’t hold back in looking at both the madness and the methods of our political parties and the systems they create in the fight for domination and electoral success; and ultimately how the emergence of Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, and future presidential contenders may signal not just a profound transformation of both political parties but their eventual end.

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When he was elected Lt. Governor of Maryland in 2003, Michael Steele made history as the first African American elected to statewide office; and again, with his subsequent chairmanship of the Republican National Committee (RNC) in 2009.

As chairman of the RNC, Steele was charged with revitalizing the Republican Party. A self-described "Lincoln Republican," under Steele’s leadership the RNC broke fundraising records (over $198 million raised during the 2010 Congressional cycle) and Republicans won 63 House seats, the biggest pickup since 1938. His commitment to grassroots organization and party building at the state and local levels produced 12 governorships and the greatest share of state legislative seats since 1928 (over 760 seats).

As Lt. Governor of Maryland, Steele’s priorities included reforming the state's Minority Business Enterprise program, improving the quality of Maryland's public education system (he championed the state’s historic Charter School law), expanding economic development in the state and fostering cooperation between government and faith-based organizations to help those in need.

Steele is a frequent guest on radio and television. He has appeared on Meet the Press, Face the Nation, HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher, and Comedy Central's The Daily Show. In addition to his work in television, Steele co-hosted the daily radio program, Steele & Ungar on the POTUS Channel on SiriusXM and is the host of the podcast The Michael Steele Podcast.

Steele’s writings on law, business and politics have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Hill.com, The Grio.com, Politico.com, The Root.com, BET.com, Townhall.com, The Journal of International Security Affairs and Catholic University Law Review, among others.

He is the author of “Right Now: A 12-Step Program for Defeating the Obama Agenda,” which is a call to arms for grassroots America and co-author of “The Recovering Politician’s Twelve Step Program to Survive Crisis”.

Born at Andrews Air Force Base in Prince George’s County, Maryland, Steele was raised in Washington, D.C. Upon graduating from Johns Hopkins University in 1981, he entered the Order of St. Augustine where he studied for the priesthood. He is a 1991 graduate of Georgetown Law Center, an Aspen Institute Rodel Fellow in Public Leadership, a University of Chicago Institute of Politics Fellow, and he currently serves as a Senior Fellow at Brown University’s Institute for International and Public Affairs.

Mr. Steele will deliver the Fall 2021 Lecture for the Res Publica Society Speaker Series.

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Tue, October 26, 2021
Dinner Program
Terrence L. Johnson

When the House of Representatives began its impeachment inquiry into President Trump’s abuse of presidential power, political commentators decried the country was in a “genuine” constitutional crisis. The claim emerged, in part, from a problem of constitutional interpretation and competing views of presidential power, abuse, and congressional oversight. By exploring Critical Race Theory, African American biblical hermeneutics, and uses of the Constitution in Black political struggles, Terrence L. Johnson, associate professor of religion and politics at Georgetown University, frames recent debates on the impending "constitutional crisis" as a failure of political imagination and a reminder of bad faith among political elites.

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Terrence L. Johnson is an associate professor of religion and politics in the department of government and Chair of political theory. He is an affiliate faculty member of the department of African American Studies and a senior faculty fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs.

Johnson is the author of "We Testify with Our Lives: How Religion Transformed Radical Thought from Black Power to Black Lives Matter" (Columbia University Press, 2021) and co-author of the forthcoming "Blacks and Jews: An Invitation to Dialogue" (Georgetown University Press, 2022). His first book, "Tragic Soul-Life: W.E.B. Du Bois and the Moral Crisis Facing American Democracy," was published in 2012 by Oxford University Press.

A graduate of Morehouse College, Johnson received his M.Div. from Harvard Divinity School and Ph.D. in Religious Studies from Brown University.

Professor Johnson's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Salvatori Center at CMC.

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Wed, October 27, 2021
Dinner Program
Charles Yu

Drawing on his experience as a fiction writer and as a writer and producer for television, Charles Yu discusses his acclaimed novel "Interior Chinatown" and the issues of immigration, assimilation, and representation that animate his storytelling. Yu also unpacks the role of the family story in his work and the weight of stereotypes in film and television that continue today.

Photo credit: Tina Chiou

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Charles Yu is the author of the critically acclaimed novel “Interior Chinatown,” a National Book Award winner that explores the confining stereotypes of Asian Americans in Hollywood and in American culture more broadly. Yu is also a television screenwriter and the author of three other books, including “How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe,” which was a New York Times Notable Book and named one of the best books of the year by Time magazine.

He received the National Book Foundation's 5 Under 35 Award and was nominated for two Writers Guild of America Awards for his work on the HBO series, Westworld. He has also written for shows on FX, AMC, and HBO. His fiction and nonfiction have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Wired, among other publications. Yu speaks to audiences of all kinds about the Asian American experience, representation and stereotypes in film and television.

Mr. Yu's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Center for Writing and Public Discourse and the Gould Center for Humanistic Studies, both at CMC.

Photo credit: Tina Chiou

Source: Penguin Random House Speakers Bureau website

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Thu, October 28, 2021
Dinner Program
Martha Minow
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Martha Minow is the 300th Anniversary University Professor at Harvard University and former dean of Harvard Law School. An advisor to nonprofit organizations and governments around the world, her books include “In Brown’s Wake: Legacies of America’s Constitutional Landmark;” “Between Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History After Genocide and Mass Violence;” and, among many books, “Making All the Difference: Inclusion, Exclusion, and American Law.” Most recently, she published “Saving the News: Why the Constitution Calls for Government Action to Preserve the Freedom of Speech” and “When Should Law Forgive?”

In 2018 when Minow was named 300th Anniversary University Professor, Harvard University’s highest faculty award, the Harvard Gazette reported: “Known for her wide-ranging intellectual curiosity and influential interdisciplinary scholarship, Minow has offered original ways to frame and reform the law’s treatment of racial and religious minorities as well as women, children, and persons with disabilities. She has taught and written about privatization, military justice, and ethnic and religious conflict, among other matters. Her work in constitutional law has addressed issues of equal protection, freedom of speech, the religion clauses, and federalism. Her current work focuses on whether and when legal systems and rules should promote forgiveness.”

Minow has taught at Harvard Law School since 1981. Her courses include civil procedure, constitutional law, fairness and privacy, family law, international criminal justice, jurisprudence, law and education, nonprofit organizations, and the public law workshop. An expert in human rights and advocacy for members of racial and religious minorities and for women, children, and persons with disabilities, she also writes and teaches about digital communications, democracy, privatization, military justice, and ethnic and religious conflict.

Minow served as d­­ean of Harvard Law School from 2009 to 2017 and as the inaugural Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor. She co-chaired the Law School’s curricular reform committee from 2003 to 2006, an effort that led to innovation in the first-year curriculum as well as new programs of study for second- and third-year law students. As dean, she strengthened public interest and clinical programs; diversity among faculty, staff, and students; interdisciplinary studies; and the financial stability of the School. 

Besides her many scholarly articles published in journals of law, history, and philosophy, her other books include “The First Global Prosecutor: Promise and Constraints” (co-edited, 2015); “Government by Contract” (co-edited, 2009); “Just Schools: Pursuing Equality in Societies of Difference” (co-edited, 2008); “Breaking the Cycles of Hatred: Memory, Law and Repair” (edited by Nancy Rosenblum with commentary by other authors, 2003); “Partners, Not Rivals: Privatization and the Public Good” (2002); “Engaging Cultural Differences: The Multicultural Challenge in Liberal Democracies” (co-edited 2002; “Not Only for Myself: Identity, Politics and Law” (1997); “Law Stories” (co-edited 1996); “Narrative, Violence and the Law: The Essays of Robert M. Cover” (co-edited 1992); and “Making All the Difference: Inclusion, Exclusion, and American Law” (1990). She is the co-editor of two law school casebooks, “Civil Procedure: Doctrine, Practice and Context” (3rd. edition 2008) and “Women and the Law” (4th edition 2007), and a reader, “Family Matters: Readings in Family Lives and the Law” (1993).

Currently the co-chair of the access to justice project of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and co-chair of the advisory board to Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Schwartzman College of Computing, Minow has served on the Center for Strategic and International Studies Commission on Countering Violent Extremism and on the Independent International Commission Kosovo. She helped to launch Imagine Co-existence, a program of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, to promote peaceful development in post-conflict societies. Her five-year partnership with the federal Department of Education and the Center for Applied Special Technology worked to increase access to the curriculum for students with disabilities and resulted in both legislative initiatives and a voluntary national standard opening access to curricular materials for individuals with disabilities. 

Her many honors include the Sargent Shriver Equal Justice Award (2016); the Joseph B. and Toby Gittler Prize, Brandeis University (2016); nine honorary degrees (in law, education, and humane letters) from schools in three countries; the Gold Medal for Outstanding Contribution to Public Discourse, awarded by the College Historical Society of Trinity College, Dublin, in recognition of efforts to promote discourse and intellectualism on a world stage; the Holocaust Center Award; and the Sacks-Freund Teaching Award, awarded by the Harvard Law School graduating class.

She serves on the boards of the Advantage Testing Foundation, the Campaign Legal Center, the Carnegie Corporation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, the SCE Foundation, and public media GBH; the Council for the American Bar Association Center for Innovation. Minow served as the inaugural chair of the Deans Steering Committee of the Association of American Law Schools and as a member of the American Bar Association Diversity and Inclusion 360 Commission. She previously chaired the board of directors for the Revson Foundation (New York) and served on the boards of the Legal Services Corporation, the bi-partisan, government-sponsored organization that provides civil legal assistance to low-income Americans; the American Bar Foundation; the CBS Corporation; the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law; the Covenant Foundation; the Iranian Human Rights Documentation Center; and Facing History and Ourselves, where she chaired the Scholars' Board. A fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences since 1992, Minow has also been a senior fellow of Harvard’s Society of Fellows, a member of Harvard University Press Board of Syndics, a senior fellow and acting director of what is now Harvard’s Safra Foundation Center on Ethics, a fellow of the American Bar Foundation and a Fellow of the American Philosophical Society. She has delivered more than 70 named or endowed lectures and keynote addresses, including the 2016 George W. Gay Lecture at Harvard Medical School’s Center for Bioethics and the 2017 Alexander Meickeljohn Lecture on media at the First Amendment at Brown University.

Minow completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Michigan; she received a master’s degree in education from Harvard; and a law degree from Yale Law School. She clerked for Judge David Bazelon of the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and then for Justice Thurgood Marshall of the Supreme Court of the United States. She joined the Harvard Law faculty as an assistant professor in 1981, was promoted to professor in 1986, was named the William Henry Bloomberg Professor of Law in 2003, and became the Jeremiah Smith Jr., Professor of Law in 2005. After her service as dean, Minow held the Carter Chair in General Jurisprudence until she became the 300th Anniversary University Professor at Harvard University.

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Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum

Claremont McKenna College
385 E. Eighth Street
Claremont, CA 91711

Phone: (909) 607-8244
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