Marian Miner Cook
Athenaeum

A distinctive
feature of social and
cultural life at CMC

 

Current Semester Schedule

 

Mon, October 10, 2022
Lunch Program
Mark Juergensmeyer

In endorsing Putin’s war in Ukraine, the Russian Orthodox Patriarch he is not just blessing the troops, he is also supporting a significant aspect of Putin’s imagination: that there is an existential battle for the survival of Russian culture and civilization which they have been called to defend. Similarly, the Proud Boys and other rioters at the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, believe themselves as were protectors of a White American Christendom that was under assault not just by liberal politicians but also by a sea change in American society that imperiled an American culture that they imagined was their birthright. In his book, God at War: A Meditation on Religion and Warfare, Mark Juergensmeyer argues that both war and religion are alternative realities: War can use religion, religion can use war, and in unusual apocalyptic moments, the two can be fused in cosmic war. It is this latter, stark and troubling marriage of religion and warfare that is demonstrated in some of the most bellicose politics of today, including the militant Proud Boys and Putin’s battle for Ukraine.

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Mark Juergensmeyer is the William F Podlich Distinguished Fellow and Visiting Professor of Religious Studies at Claremont McKenna College and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Global Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he was the founding director of global studies and the Orfalea Center for Global and International Studies. He is a pioneer in the global studies field, focusing on global religion, religious violence, conflict resolution and South Asian religion and politics. He has published more than three hundred articles and twenty books, including the revised and expanded fourth edition of the award-winning Terror in the Mind of God (University of California Press, 2017), and the Oxford Handbook of Global Religion (Oxford University Press, 2014). His most recent books are God at War: A Meditation on Religion and Warfare (Oxford University Press 2020) and When God Stops Fighting: How Religious Violence Ends (University of California Press 2022).
 

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Mon, October 10, 2022
Dinner Program
Graham Lee Brewer

Native representation in popular culture and media has reached a new level. From the popularity to TV shows with all Native writing castes to news organizations large and small focusing on centering Indigenous voices in their stories and newsrooms, Indigenous peoples are finally starting to have a foothold in industries that have long sought to marginalize — or commoditize — their experiences. But, argues Graham Lee Brewer, a national investigative reporter at NBC News, what we are experiencing is not a “moment” for Native creatives, as it has often been described. It is the culmination of generations of Indigenous activism, journalism, protest, and sacrifice that has finally forced a reckoning.

Photo credit: Dylan Johnson

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Graham Lee Brewer of the Cherokee Nation is a national investigative reporter at NBC News covering Indigenous communities. His reporting focuses on areas such as tribal sovereignty, treaty rights, and the ways federal laws affect tribal nations. Previously, Brewer was an associate editor at High Country News, where he helped build the only Indigenous affairs desk at a national publication that was not Native-owned. He is also the vice-president of the Native American Journalists Association.  

Mr. Brewer is the featured speaker in recognition of Indigenous Peoples' Day. 

Photo credit: Dylan Johnson

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Tue, October 11, 2022
Dinner Program
Jane Hirshfield

Described by The Washington Post as belonging “among the modern masters” and by The New York Times as “passionate and radiant,” award-winning poet Jane Hirshfield work ranges from the political, ecological, and scientific to the metaphysical, personal, and passionate.

Photo credit: Curt Richter

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Author of nine poetry books including The Beauty, long-listed for the 2015 National Book Award; Given Sugar, Given Salt, a finalist for the 2001 National Book Critics Circle Award; After, short-listed for England’s T.S. Eliot Award; and Hirshfield’s ninth poetry collection Ledger.

Hirshfield’s other honors include The Poetry Center Book Award; fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller Foundations, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Academy of American Poets; Columbia University’s Translation Center Award; The California Book Award, Northern California Book Reviewers Award, and the Donald Hall-Jane Kenyon Prize in American Poetry. Her work appears in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Times Literary Supplement, The New York Review of Books, Poetry, and ten editions of The Best American Poetry. 

In fall 2004, Hirshfield was awarded the 70th Academy Fellowship for distinguished poetic achievement by The Academy of American Poets, an honor formerly held by such poets as Robert Frost, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, and Elizabeth Bishop. In 2012, she was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. In March 2019 she was voted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Hirshfield has taught at Stanford University, UC Berkeley, Duke University, Bennington College, and elsewhere. Her work has been translated into over a dozen languages and set by numerous composers, including John Adams and Philip Glass; her TED-ED animated introduction to metaphor has received over 875,000 views. An intimate and profound master of her art, her frequent appearances at universities, writers’ conferences and festivals in this country and abroad are highly acclaimed. 

Photo credit: Curt Richter

(This event was originally scheduled for March 30, 2020.)

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Wed, October 12, 2022
Dinner Program
Oriana Skylar Mastro

How do rising countries like China build influence in a world dominated by more established powers? Whereas most experts assume that China has sought to emulate the U.S., Oriana Skylar Mastro, Center Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University, argues that China has become powerful mainly through doing things differently. Beijing has exploited U.S. blind spots, maneuvered in areas of uncertainty, and engaged in what she calls “entrepreneurial” foreign policy. These findings have significant implications for understanding China's unique strategic approach—a necessary pursuit if the U.S. is to successfully engage in great power competition.

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Oriana Skylar Mastro is a Center Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University where her research focuses on Chinese military and security policy, war termination, and coercive diplomacy. Mastro is also a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. She continues to serve in the United States Air Force Reserve as a strategic planner at United States Indo-Pacific Command.

Mastro holds a B.A. in East Asian Studies from Stanford University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Politics from Princeton University.

Dr. Mastro’s Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies at CMC.

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Thu, October 13, 2022
Dinner Program
Aditya Pai '13 and Ilan Wurman ‘09

In November 2016, Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton in the U.S. presidential election despite losing the popular vote by almost 2.9 million votes. The result spurred a national conversation about the Electoral College—a distinctively American mechanism for selecting a head of state and of government. While the system has roots in America's founding, many have called for a modern re-thinking and revision of what they see as an arcane, ineffective, and unjust electoral structure. Given both its storied constitutional history and evident shortcomings, should the United States abolish the Electoral College? Debating this issue are Aditya Pai '13, attorney at Rutan & Tucker, and Ilan Wurman '09, professor of law at Arizona State University and , both CMC and Rose Institute alumni. Event attendees will vote either in favor or against the resolution " This House should abolish the Electoral College" both before and after the debate.

This program is co-sponsored by the Dreier Roundtable whose mission it is to inspire public service with additional support from the Rose Institute of State and Local Government at CMC.

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Aditya Pai ’13
Aditya Pai ’13 is a trial attorney at Rutan & Tucker, LLP., where he represents owners, general contractors, and subcontractors in the construction industry as well as non-profits. He is an Urban Land Institute (ULI) under 35 Young Leader and serves in board advisory roles at Dev/Mission, a youth workforce development non-profit, and Habitat for Humanity Orange County. Prior to entering law practice, Pai interned for Montana Governor Steve Bullock and U.S. Senator Mark Warner. He earned a J.D. from Harvard, M. Phil. from Cambridge, and B.A. from Claremont McKenna College, where he served as manager of the Rose Institute of State and Local Government and student body president. 

Ilan Wurman '09
Ilan Wurman '09 is an associate professor at the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, where he teaches administrative law and constitutional law. He writes on administrative law, separation of powers, and constitutionalism, and his academic writing has appeared in the Yale Law Journal, the Stanford Law Review, the University of Chicago Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, the Duke Law Journal, and the Texas Law Review among other journals. He is also the author of A Debt Against the Living: An Introduction to Originalism (Cambridge 2017), and The Second Founding: An Introduction to the Fourteenth Amendment (Cambridge 2020). 

Prior to entering academia, Wurman clerked for the Honorable Jerry E. Smith on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and practiced law for three-and-a-half years at Winston & Strawn in Washington, D.C. He also served as deputy general counsel on Rand Paul's U.S. presidential campaign in 2015 and as associate counsel on Tom Cotton's U.S. Senate campaign in 2014. He is a graduate of Stanford Law School and Claremont McKenna College.

This program is co-sponsored by the Dreier Roundtable whose mission it is to inspire public service with additional support from the Rose Institute of State and Local Government at CMC.

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Wed, October 19, 2022
Dinner Program
Elizabeth Ito

A Peabody Award winner for her Netflix series City of Ghosts and Emmy winning director for her work on Adventure Time, Elizabeth Ito will talk about the evolution of her creative process, share advice that has been instrumental to her personal creative journey and growth, and show how to adapt to changing times as a creative person.

Ms. Ito’s Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Center for Writing and Public Discourse at CMC.

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Elizabeth Ito has been working as a creator, writer, director, and storyboard artist in the animation industry since 2004 on TV, feature, and commercial projects. She has received an Emmy for her directing work on Adventure Time, and is the co-creator of the award-winning short, Welcome to My Life, the second-most viewed short in Cartoon Network History.

Her first series, City of Ghosts for Netflix premiered in 2021 and won a Peabody Award in 2022. She recently directed a music video for The Linda Linda's and is on an overall deal with Apple TV.

Currently, she is living in Los Angeles, working from home, and trying to stay hydrated.

Ms. Ito’s Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Center for Writing and Public Discourse at CMC.

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Thu, October 20, 2022
Dinner Program
Bari Weiss

Bari Weiss, an opinion writer and writer, and publisher of Common Sense with Bari Weiss, will explore the new founders America needs today, addressing the broken moment we are in as a culture and a country, and what is required of us to meet this moment.

Ms. Weiss’s Athenaeum talk is co-sponsored by the Open Academy at CMC.

 
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Bari Weiss is an opinion writer and editor. She is the author of How to Fight Anti-Semitism, which won a 2019 National Jewish Book Award and a Natan Notable Book Award.

In 2021, Bari launched the Common Sense with Bari Weiss Substack newsletter and Honestly with Bari Weiss podcast. From 2017 to 2020, Weiss Bari was an opinion writer and editor at The New York Times. Before that, she was an op-ed and book review editor at The Wall Street Journal and a senior editor at Tablet Magazine.

Weiss has won several awards, including the Daniel Pearl Award for Courage and Integrity in Journalism and Reason Foundation’s 2018 Bastiat Prize, which honors writing that “best demonstrates the importance of freedom with originality, wit, and eloquence.” In 2019, Vanity Fair called Weiss the Times's "star opinion writer" and The Jerusalem Post named her the seventh most influential Jew in the world.

A Pittsburgh native, Weiss ia a graduate of Columbia University. 

Ms. Weiss’s Athenaeum talk is co-sponsored by the Open Academy at CMC.

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Mon, October 24, 2022
Lunch Program
Anna Romandash

Based on her experience as an investigative journalist in Ukraine, Anna Romandash explores the role of information framing for understanding the Russian attack on Ukraine and other violent conflicts. With over 25,000 crimes currently under investigation in Ukraine, Romandash will highlight some of the challenges of researching, reporting, verifying real-time testimonials, and data management all while trying to tap international networks for world-wide coverage in real time. The role of social media as a facilitator and impediment will be highlighted alongside important ethical issues about the relationship between accountability and privacy.

Ms. Romandash’s Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Mgrublian Center for Human Rights at CMC.

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Anna Romandash is an award-winning journalist from Ukraine. She was named Media Freedom Ambassador of Ukraine for her human rights and media work and is one of the winners of the European Institute of Mediterranean literary contest for her reporting.

When Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, 2022, Anna started writing about the situation in her home country. She has written stories about survivors of Russian-made massacres in Northern Ukraine, the drama of internally displaced people and refugees forced to flee their homes, and volunteers helping others in times of need. She is a part of an investigative team collecting data on human rights violations and crimes against humanity during the Russo-Ukrainian war. 

Interested in audio storytelling and long-reads, Romandash enjoys working on feature stories and reportages which embed and localize the readers in the reality told through the eyes of the protagonists. She is the laureate of the Literary Reportages Award “Samovydets” from the Tempora Publishing House as her stories were named among the best reportages in Ukrainian in 2020 and 2021.

Ms. Romandash’s Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Mgrublian Center for Human Rights at CMC.

 

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Mon, October 24, 2022
Dinner Program
Ishion Hutchinson

Author of two poetry collections, Far District and House of Lords and Commons, Ishion Hutchinson, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry, will read from his works.

Mr. Hutchinson’s Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Gould Center for Humanistic Studies at CMC.

Photo credit: Neil Watson

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Ishion Hutchinson was born in Port Antonio, Jamaica. He is the author of two poetry collections: Far District and House of Lords and Commons. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Joseph Brodsky Rome Prize, the Whiting Writers Award, the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award, the Windham-Campbell Prize for Poetry and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Award in Literature, among others. He is a contributing editor to the literary journals The Common and Tongue: A Journal of Writing & Art and teaches in the graduate writing program at Cornell University.

(Source: http://www.ishionhutchinson.com/)

Mr. Hutchinson’s Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Gould Center for Humanistic Studies at CMC.

Photo credit: Neil Watson

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Tue, October 25, 2022
Dinner Program
Stephanie Muravchik and Jon Shields

Although MAGA conservatives endlessly faulted Liz Cheney for fighting Donald Trump instead of “woke” identity politics on the left, her primary defeat had everything to do with the triumph of an identity politics that is remaking the American right. Stephanie Muravchik and Jon Shields, both professors at CMC,  have been traveling Cheney’s home state of Wyoming in an effort to understand the right’s new obsession with identity—and what it means for all of us. 

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Stephanie Muravchik
Stephanie Muravchik is coauthor, with Jon A. Shields, of Trump’s Democrats, which was published in September 2020 by the Brookings Institution Press. It is a political ethnography of three blue strongholds that flipped Republican in the 2016 election. Her research explores the intersections of politics with class, family, and religion. Her first book was American Protestantism in an Age of Psychology (Cambridge, 2011). She teaches government at Claremont McKenna College.

Jon Shields
Jon Shields is a professor of American politics and chair of the government department at Claremont McKenna College. Shields is the author or co-author of three books on the American right, including Trump’s Democrats (with Stephanie Muravchik)(Brookings, 2020) and Passing on the Right: Conservative Professors in the Progressive University (Oxford 2016). His writings have also appeared in a wide range of popular outlets, including the Bulwark, Los Angeles Times, New Republic, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and New York Times.

Previously, he taught at the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs and Cornell University, and he is also a founding member of the Academic Freedom Alliance. 

His latest book on Liz Cheney , on which this talk is based, is co-authored with Stephanie Muravchik.

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Wed, October 26, 2022
Dinner Program
Joe Soss

Joe Soss, the inaugural Cowles Chair for the Study of Public Service at the University of Minnesota, with faculty positions in the Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, the departments of political science and of sociology, will explore how government and corporate actors systematically use criminal justice practices to strip resources from poor communities of color. Taking a historical view, Soss will discuss the fundamental roles that criminal justice predation has played in race-making and political and economic development in the U.S.

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Joe Soss is the inaugural Cowles Chair for the Study of Public Service at the University of Minnesota, where he holds faculty positions in the Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, the department of political science, and the department of sociology. His research and teaching explore the interplay of politics, inequalities, and public policy.

Soss’s work has focused primarily on how various forms of social welfare and criminal justice governance in the U.S. have intersected with class, race, and gender as intersecting axes of oppression and predation. Soss's co-authored book, Disciplining the Poor (2011), was selected for the 2012 Michael Harrington Award (APSA, New Political Science), the 2012 Oliver Cromwell Cox Award (ASA, Section on Racial and Ethnic Minorities), the 2012 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title Award (American Library Association), and the 2015 Herbert Simon Award (APSA, Section on Public Administration).

In 2016, Soss was honored with the University of Minnesota's campus-wide award for outstanding contributions to graduate education, named a Distinguished University Teaching Professor, and inducted into the UMN Academy of Distinguished Teachers. Soss's current book project, co-authored with Joshua Page, is Preying on the Poor: Criminal Justice as Revenue Racket.

Professor Soss's Athenaeum presentation is part of the "Race Across Disciplines" series which explores how different academic disciplines approach research, insights, and findings around race.

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Thu, October 27, 2022
Dinner Program
Timothy Frye

Conventional wisdom treats Russian politics as either an extension of Vladimir Putin's worldview or Russia's unique history, but in Weak StrongmanTimothy Frye, the Marshall D. Shulman Professor of Post-Soviet Foreign Policy at Columbia University, emphasizes Russia's similarities to other autocracies and highlights the difficult trade-offs that confront the Kremlin on issues from election fraud and repression to propaganda and foreign policy. Balancing personal anecdotes from his 30 years of researching Russia and cutting-edge social science, Weak Strongman offers the best evidence available about how Russia actually works, why Russia invaded Ukraine, and what the future holds for US-Russian relations.

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Timothy Frye is the Marshall D. Shulman Professor of Post-Soviet Foreign Policy and professor of political science at Columbia University.      

 

Frye worked on a cultural exchange program for the United States Information Agency in six cities in the Soviet Union in the late 1980s and advised the Russian Securities and Exchange Commission in the 1990s. He directed the Harriman Institute at Columbia from 2009 to 2015 and co-directed a research laboratory at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow from 2011-2022.

Frye is the editor of Post-Soviet Affairs and the author of four books, most recently Weak Strongman: The Limits of Power in Putin’s Russia, which was shortlisted for the 2022 Pushkin House Prize for best non-fiction book about Russia. He will hold the Library of Congress Chair on US-Russian Relations beginning in January 2023.

Frye earned a B.A. in Russian Language and Literature from Middlebury College, an M.A. in International Affairs and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University. He taught at The Ohio State University for 8 years before he returned to Columbia University in 2006

Professor Frye’s Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies at CMC.

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Tue, November 1, 2022
Dinner Program
John Fund and Gowri Ramachandran, panelists

In recent years, state legislatures in Georgia, Texas, Florida, and elsewhere have changed election law to strengthen voter identification requirements, limit mail elections and ballot collection, or tighten absentee ballot deadlines. Critics argue that these laws represent "Jim Crow 2.0," an attempt to suppress the votes of blacks and other racial minorities. Supporters argue that they are necessary to ensure secure elections and that they pose no unfair barriers to voters of any race. In a conversation facilitated by Zachary Courser, visiting assistant professor of government at CMC and director of the CMC's Policy Lab, John Fund of the National Review and Gowri Ramachandrann of the Brennan Center, will share their perspectives on this nationally debated issue.

This event is co-sponsored by the Jerome H. Garris Dialogue Series at CMC with additional support from the Open Academy and the Presidential Initiative on Anti-Racism and the Black Experience in America, all at CMC.

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John Fund
John Fund is national affairs columnist for National Review magazine, a contributor to Fox News.com, and an on-air analyst for Newsmax TV. He is an often-quoted expert on the interconnections between politics and economics.

He previously served as a columnist and editorial board member for The Wall Street Journal. for 27 years.  

He is the author or co-author of several books, including Our Broken Elections: How The Left Changed The Way You Vote (2021), Obama's Enforcer: Eric Holder (2014), Who's Counting(2012); and Cleaning House: America's Campaign For Term Limits (1994).

Born in Tucson, Arizona, he worked as a research analyst for the California Legislature in Sacramento before beginning his journalism career as a reporter for the syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak. He has reported on foreign affairs from over 40 countries. 

Roll Call, the newspaper of Capitol Hill, called him "the Tom Paine of the modern Congressional reform movement." He has won awards from the Institute for Justice, The Competitive Enterprise Institute and The Fund for American Studies. 

Gowri Ramachandran
Gowri Ramachandran serves as senior counsel in the Brennan Center’s Democracy program. Her work focuses on election security, election administration, and combatting election disinformation.

Before joining the Brennan Center, she was professor of law at Southwestern Law School, in Los Angeles where she taught courses in constitutional law, employment discrimination, critical race theory, and the Ninth Circuit Appellate Litigation Clinic. Her work has been published in Election Law Journal, North Carolina Law Review, and Yale Law Journal online, among others.

She serves on the Ninth Circuit’s Fairness Committee, which considers racial, religious, gender, and other disparities in the administration of justice.

Ramachandran received her undergraduate degree in mathematics from Yale College and a master’s degree in statistics from Harvard University. While in law school, she served as editor-in-chief of the Yale Law Journal. After graduating from law school in 2003, Ramachandran served as law clerk to Judge Sidney R. Thomas of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in Billings, Montana.

(Source: https://www.brennancenter.org/experts/gowri-ramachandran)

This event is co-sponsored by the Jerome H. Garris Dialogue Series at CMC with additional support from the Open Academy and the Presidential Initiative on Anti-Racism and the Black Experience in America, all at CMC.

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Wed, November 2, 2022
Dinner Program
Jesse Washington

Jesse Washington, journalist and documentary filmmaker for ESPN’s Andscape and co-author of the John Thompson autobiography I CAME AS A SHADOW, will examine the ongoing emancipation of Black players in college and pro sports and discuss the most recent developments in Black athlete and executive empowerment.

Mr. Washington’s Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Gould Center for Humanistic Studies at CMC.

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Jesse Washington is a journalist and documentary filmmaker for ESPN’s Andscape, a Black-led media platform dedicated to creating, highlighting, and uplifting the diverse stories of Black identity. He is the co-author of I Came as a Shadow which details the life of the late and legendary Georgetown basketball coach, John Thompson; he is author of the novel Black Will Shoot. Washington is currently writing the autobiography of the sports agent Rich Paul.

With a long career in journalism and writing, Washington has been, since 2015, a senior writer for ESPN's The Undefeated, a platform for exploring the intersections of race, sports, and culture that created the basis for Andscape. He has won a National Journalism Award from the Asian-American Journalists Association, Journalist of the Year award from the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists, two feature awards from the National Association of Black Journalists, and a 2019 Associated Press Sports Editors Top 10 award for column writing.

Washington has a B.A. in English from Yale University. A lifelong member of the Baha'i Faith, he notes that he still gets buckets.

Mr. Washington’s Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Gould Center for Humanistic Studies at CMC.

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Thu, November 3, 2022
Dinner Program
Alex Ehrlich

The majority of Americans are paid hourly wages and live paycheck to paycheck. Yet, argues Alex Ehrlich, CEO of startup financial services company Percapita Group, banks are built to thrive when they serve the minority of Americans who are high-margin customers. Low-income consumers and communities are often perceived by banks as dilutive of their return on capital. Can banks that consistently fail to look like the communities they serve earn and deserve the trust of those communities? Or is there a way out of the conflict between capitalism’s profit imperative and the individual’s need to hold, save, borrow, and spend money? 

Mr. Ehrlich's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Financial Economics Institute at CMC.

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Alex Ehrlich, CEO of startup financial services company Percapita Group, is building an institution that aims to confront the historic lack of diversity in financial services, and to serve well the consumers across America whose economic needs are greatest. 

Ehrlich spent forty years on Wall Street: Starting at Goldman Sachs (1979-2003), he then moved to UBS (2003-09), and finally to Morgan Stanley (2009-20). He served as a managing director of all three companies and led or co-headed numerous large and highly successful businesses. At Morgan Stanley, he chaired the Diversity Council of that firm’s Investment Bank; it was this work that led him to retire from traditional banking, and seek the business model, partners, and capital that would enable Percapita to launch in early 2023.

Ehrlich also serves on the national boards of iMentor and ThanksUSA, and is a Non-Executive Director of Sharegain PLC. He has for many years been a frequent lecturer on culture, leadership, and diversity.

Mr. Ehrlich's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Financial Economics Institute at CMC.

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Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum

Claremont McKenna College
385 E. Eighth Street
Claremont, CA 91711

Phone: (909) 607-8244
Email:

Contact

Phone: (909) 621-8244
Fax: (909) 621-8579
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