Marian Miner Cook
Athenaeum

A distinctive
feature of social and
cultural life at CMC

 

Current Semester Schedule

 

Tue, March 8, 2022
Lunch Program
Albert L. Park

Global political, economic, social, and environmental upheavals since the early 2000s have proven that the 21st Century will be full of volatility and uncertainty. People are seeking systems of knowledge and practice to make sense of changes and help guide them through the everyday happenings at the local, national, and global levels. Professor Albert Park, the Bank of America Associate Professor of Pacific Basin Studies at Claremont McKenna College, will speak to the pivotal role history can play in this milieu and how historians should approach the past by being “mad” in order to engage the fractured present. 

Professor Park's Athenaeum presentation celebrates his installation ceremony as the Bank of America Associate Professor of Pacific Basin Studies at Claremont McKenna College.

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Albert L. Park is the Bank of America Associate Professor of Pacific Basin Studies at Claremont McKenna College. As a historian of modern Korea and East Asia, his current research project focuses on the roots of environmentalism in modern Korean history and its relationship to locality and local autonomy. His book project is tentatively titled "Imagining Nature and the Creation of Environmental Movements in Modern Korea." He is the author of "Building a Heaven on Earth: Religion, Activism and Protest in Japanese Occupied Korea" and is the co-editor of "Encountering Modernity: Christianity and East Asia."

Park is the co-founder of EnviroLab Asia—a Henry Luce Foundation-funded initiative at the Claremont Colleges that researches environmental issues in Asia through a cross-disciplinary lens. He is the co-founder and co-editor of "Environments of East Asia"—a Cornell University Press, multidisciplinary book series that covers environmental issues and questions of East Asia. He also serves as an associate editor for the Journal of Asian Studies. 

Park is the recipient of four Fulbright Fellowships for Research, an Abe Fellowship (Social Science Research Council and Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership), and fellowships from the Korea Foundation and the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Chicago. 

A native of Chicago, he received his B.A. with honors from Northwestern University, an M.A. from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in History from the University of Chicago.  

Professor Park's Athenaeum presentation celebrates his installation ceremony as the Bank of America Associate Professor of Pacific Basin Studies at Claremont McKenna College.

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Tue, March 8, 2022
Dinner Program
John List

Why do some ideas make it big while others fail to take off? According to award-winning University of Chicago behavioral economist John List, the answer comes down to a single question: Can the idea scale? Using a mix of original research and real-world anecdotes from working with companies like Uber, Lyft, and Tinder, in his new book The Voltage Effect, List reveals why some ideas take off (or scale) and why others fall flat. By understanding the science of scaling, List believes we can drive change in our schools, workplaces, communities, and society at large. Because a better world can only be built at scale.

Photo credit: John Boehm from Boehm Photography 

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John A. List is the Kenneth C. Griffin Distinguished Service Professor in Economics at the University of Chicago. For decades his field experimental research has focused on issues related to the inner-workings of markets, the effects of various incentives schemes on market equilibria and allocations, how behavioral economics can augment the standard economic model, on early childhood education and interventions, and most recently on the gender earnings gap in the gig economy (using evidence from rideshare drivers). This has lead to collaborative work with several different firms including:  Lyft, Uber, United Airlines, Virgin Airlines, Humana, Sears, Kmart, Facebook, Google, General Motors, Tinder, Citadel, Walmart, and several non-profits.

List's research includes over 200 peer-reviewed journal articles and several published books, including the 2013 international best-seller, The Why Axis: Hidden Motives and the Undiscovered Economics of Everyday Life (with Uri Gneezy), and The Voltage Effect: How to Make Good Ideas Great and Great Ideas Scale (publication date February 1, 2022).

List was elected a Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2011, and a Fellow of the Econometric Society in 2015. List received the 2010 Kenneth Galbraith Award, the 2008 Arrow Prize for Senior Economists for his research in behavioral economics in the field, and was the 2012 Yrjo Jahnsson Lecture Prize recipient. He is a current editor of the Journal of Political Economy.

 

View Video: YouTube with John List

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Wed, March 9, 2022
Dinner Program
Fiona Hill

Fiona Hill, senior fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe in the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institute, served as deputy assistant to the president and senior director for European and Russian affairs on the U.S. National Security Council from 2017 to 2019. An expert on European and Russian affairs, intelligence, and security issues, Dr. Hill will discuss these and other pressing topics, including global nationalism and populism, in a conversation moderated by Professor Hilary Appel, the Podlich Family Professor of Government and George R. Roberts Fellow at Claremont McKenna College.

Dr. Hill will deliver the Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies’ 2022 Arthur Adams Family Distinguished Lecture. Her lecture is also co-sponsored by The Lecture in in Diplomacy and International Security. As one of CMC’s 75th Anniversary Distinguished Speakers, Dr. Hill will highlight issues in “Unity and Division” one of the three academic collaboration themes of our special 75th Anniversary celebration.

 

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Prior to joining Brookings, Fiona Hill was director of strategic planning at The Eurasia Foundation in Washington, D.C. Before that, she held a number of positions directing technical assistance and research projects at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, including associate director of the Strengthening Democratic Institutions Project; she has served as director of the Project on Ethnic Conflict in the Former Soviet Union; and also served as coordinator of the Trilateral Study on Japanese-Russian-U.S. Relations.

Hill has researched and published extensively on issues related to Russia, the Caucasus, Central Asia, regional conflicts, energy, and strategic issues. Her book with Brookings Senior Fellow Clifford Gaddy, The Siberian Curse: How Communist Planners Left Russia Out in the Cold, was published by Brookings Institution Press in December 2003, and her monograph, Energy Empire: Oil, Gas and Russia’s Revival, was published by the London Foreign Policy Centre in 2004. The first edition of Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin was published by Brookings Institution Press in December 2013, also with Clifford Gaddy.

Hill holds a master’s in Soviet studies and a doctorate in history from Harvard University where she was a Frank Knox Fellow. She also holds a master’s in Russian and modern history from St. Andrews University in Scotland, and has pursued studies at Moscow’s Maurice Thorez Institute of Foreign Languages. Hill is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Dr. Hill will deliver the Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies’ 2022 Arthur Adams Family Distinguished Lecture. As one of CMC’s 75th Anniversary Distinguished Speakers, Dr. Hill will highlight issues in “Unity and Division” one of the three academic collaboration themes of our special 75th Anniversary celebration.

(Adapted from the Brookings Institute)

 

View Video: YouTube with Fiona Hill

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Tue, March 22, 2022
Dinner Program
Christopher Slobogin

Statistically derived algorithms, adopted by many jurisdictions in an effort to identify the risk of reoffending posed by criminal defendants, have been labeled as racist, dehumanizing, and antithetical to the foundational tenets of criminal justice. In his new book with Cambridge University Press, Just Algorithms: Using Science to Reduce Incarceration and Inform a Jurisprudence of Risk, Christopher Slobogin, the Milton R. Underwood Chair in Law and director of the Criminal Justice Program at Vanderbilt University, argues that these attacks are misguided and that, properly regulated, risk assessment tools can be a crucial means of safely and humanely dismantling our massive jail and prison complex. His presentation will focus on how these instruments can also help the law develop principles that govern the criminal justice system’s consideration of risk.

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Chris Slobogin is the the Milton R. Underwood Chair in Law and director of the Criminal Justice Program at Vanderbilt University. He has authored more than 200 articles, books, and chapters on topics relating to criminal law and procedure, mental health law and evidence, and is one of the five most cited criminal law and procedure law professors in the country over the past five years, according to the Leiter Report. 

His work has been published by Cambridge, Chicago, Harvard and Oxford university presses and in journals such as the Chicago Law Review, Georgetown Law Journal, Northwestern Law Review, Pennsylvania Law Review, Stanford Law Review, and Virginia Law Review. In recognition for his work in mental health law, in 2016 Slobogin received both the American Board of Forensic Psychology's Distinguished Contribution Award and the American Psychology-Law Society’s Distinguished Contribution of Psychology and Law Award; only a total of five law professors have received either of these awards in their 30-year history, and Slobogin is the only to receive both awards. Slobogin has appeared on Good Morning America, Nightline, the Today Show, National Public Radio, and many other media outlets, and has been cited in almost 5,000 law review articles and treatises and more than 200 judicial opinions, including five U.S. Supreme Court decisions. He holds a secondary appointment as a professor in Vanderbilt School of Medicine's Department of Psychiatry.

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Wed, March 23, 2022
Dinner Program
Daron Acemoglu

Why are some nations extremely rich while others remain cripplingly poor? And why is the gap between the two widening? What separates the haves from the have-nots, Daron Acemoglu, professor of applied economics at MIT, argues has nothing to do with geography or natural resources, as is commonly believed. Instead, nations live or die on the soundness of their institutions, the fairness of their laws, and the transparency of their governments. Drawing on powerful examples from America to Mexico to Sierra Leone to Singapore, Acemoglu shows us that, with strong institutions in place, individuals (and nations) are given the incentive and the opportunities to achieve and innovate. And increasingly pressing today, how can we protect democratic institutions, the foundations of political systems, as financial crises, polarizing politics, and reduced wages erode trust in democracy itself?

As one of CMC’s 75th Anniversary Distinguished Speakers, Professor Acemoglu will highlight issues in “Civilization and Commerce,” one of the three academic collaboration themes of our special 75th Anniversary celebration.

Photo credit: L. Barry Hetherington

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Daron Acemoglu is a professor of applied economics at MIT and a fellow of the Econometric Society, the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Society of Labor Economists. In 2019, he was named Institute Professor, MIT’s most distinguished faculty honor. He has a wide academic focus, specializing in political economy, labor economics, and economic development, amongst other disciplines. 

Acemoglu has received numerous honors, awards, and distinctions for his academic work, including the Carnegie Fellowship, the Kiel Institute’s 2019 Global Economy Prize, the Jean-Jacques Laffont Prize, the John Bates Clark Medal, the Erwin Plein Nemmers Prize, and the BBVA Frontiers of Knowledge Award. He has been named to Foreign Policy’s Top 100 Global Thinkers twice.

He has authored five books: Why Nations Fail, The Narrow Corridor, Epilogue from Introduction to Modern Economic Growth, Introduction to Modern Economic Growth, and Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. Acemoglu has also written for Esquire and Foreign Policy and contributed to academic publications such as The Journal of Economic Growth, The Economic Journal, the American Economic Review, and the Journal of Political Economy, amongst others. 

 

View Video: YouTube with Daron Acemoglu

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Thu, March 24, 2022
Dinner Program
Colum McCann

Apeirogon, Colum McCann’s 2020 novel, has been hailed as “transformative” by both Israeli and Palestinian writers. Taking as its fulcrum the real-life story of two fathers who have lost their young daughters to the conflict in the Holy Land, Apeirogon (defined in geometry as a shape with a countably infinite number of sides) ranges over vast time and geography. Using the power of storytelling, McCann strives to bridge intractable divides where decades of political negotiations and military conflicts have not been successful. In this very special program, McCann will engage with the two fathers, one Israeli and one Palestinian, both of whom will zoom in from the Middle East.

Mr. McCann's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Open Academy at CMC.

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Colum McCann is the author of seven novels and three collections of stories. Born and raised in Dublin, Ireland, he has been the recipient of many international honors, including the U.S National Book Award, the International Dublin Literary Prize, a Chevalier des Arts et Lettres from the French government, election to the Irish arts academy, several European awards, the 2010 Best Foreign Novel Award in China, and an Oscar nomination. In 2017 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts. His work has been published in over 40 languages. He is the president and co-founder of the non-profit global story exchange organization, Narrative 4. He is the Thomas Hunter Writer in Residence in Hunter College, in New York, where he lives with his wife Allison and their family.  His most recent novel, Apeirogon, became an immediate New York Times best-seller and won several major international awards.

Mr. McCann's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Open Academy at CMC.

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Mon, March 28, 2022
Dinner Program
Monica A. Coleman

New York Times bestseller Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler invokes deities from traditional West African religion. The ability to recognize these deities and what they represent shifts understanding of survival and salvation. Monica Coleman, a professor of Africana Studies at the University of Delaware shares how she helped form an international online community around the wisdom of this book for people searching for a way forward during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Professor Coleman's Athenaeum lecture is sponsored by the Kutten Lectureship in Religious Studies at CMC.

Photo credit: https://monicaacoleman.com/about/

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Monica Coleman is a professor of Africana Studies at the University of Delaware, an elder in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, a renowned speaker on issues of religion and sexuality, and an initiate in traditional Yoruba faith. Her academic interests include black and womanist theologies, mental health and faith, and African traditional religions, amongst others. She teaches classes relating to these disciplines as well as courses on religious leadership and cross-cultural liberation theologies. Coleman’s research interests explore the intersection of religion, social justice, and human experience. 

She has authored several works including Making a Way Out of No Way: A Womanist Theology and her memoir, Bipolar Faith: a Black Woman’s Journey with Depression and Faith. Further, Coleman received several distinctions including the Silver Illumination Award and induction into the Martin Luther King, Jr. Collegium of Scholars. She is a recipient of fellowships and funding from the Mellon Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the Association for Theological Schools, and the Forum for Theological Exploration. 

Coleman is also a co-host of Octavia Tried to Tell Us: Parable for Today’s Pandemic, a popular webinar series in which she uses lessons from Afrofuturist literature, values, and theology to address important current events and community issues.

Professor Coleman's Athenaeum lecture is sponsored by the Kutten Lectureship in Religious Studies at CMC.

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Tue, March 29, 2022
Dinner Program
Glenn Loury

Glenn Loury, the Merton P. Stoltz Professor of the Social Sciences and Professor of Economics at Brown University, in conversation with Michael Fortner, an associate professor of government at CMC, will discuss the unique and critical historical, social, and economic perspectives of the legacy of race on the American experience and offer reflections for responsible leadership of such challenging and enduring issues.

As one of CMC’s 75th Anniversary Distinguished Speakers, Professor Loury will highlight issues in Civilization and Commerce, one of the three academic collaboration themes of our special 75th Anniversary celebration.

Photo credit: Watson Institute, Brown University 

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A prominent social critic and public intellectual writing mainly on the themes of racial inequality and social policy, Glenn Loury, the Merton P. Stoltz Professor of the Social Sciences and Professor of Economics at Brown University, has published more than 200 essays and reviews in journals of public affairs in the US and abroad.


He has published extensively in the areas of applied microeconomic theory, game theory, industrial organization, natural resource economics, and the economics of race and inequality. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Econometric Society and a member of the American Philosophical Society. In 2005 he received the John von Neumann Award, given annually by the Rajk László College of the Budapest University of Economic Science and Public Administration to "an outstanding economist whose research has exerted a major influence on students of the College over an extended period of time." He is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Carnegie Scholarship to support his work. He has given the prestigious Tanner Lectures on Human Values at Stanford (2007), the James A. Moffett '29 Lectures in Ethics at Princeton (2003), and the DuBois Lectures in African American Studies at Harvard (2000).

Loury is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, is a contributing editor at The Boston Review, and was for many years a contributing editor at The New Republic. His book One by One, From the Inside Out: Essays and Reviews on Race and Responsibility in America (The Free Press, 1995) won the American Book Award and the Christianity Today Book Award.

A graduate of Northwestern University, he received his Ph.D. from MIT in 1976. He taught at Northwestern and at the University of Michigan before moving to Harvard. In 1982, at the age of 33, he became the first African American tenured professor of economics in the history of Harvard University. He has been at Brown University since 2005.

(Adapted from the website of Brown’s Watson Institute)

View Video: YouTube with Glenn Loury and Michael Javen Fortner

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Wed, March 30, 2022
Dinner Program
David Treuer

Native Americans are, perversely, the most visible invisible minority. They represent a fraction of the U.S. population and most Americans go through their lives without having had any meaningful or daily interactions with Native folk. And yet Native Americans occupy vast tracts of imaginative space. They are everywhere in the mind but "nowhere" in the lives of most Americans. That disparity and the invisibility it suggests are not accidental. David Treuer, award winning writer, professor of English at USC, and editor at large at Pantheon, will talk about the ways in which Native people are actively un-seen: as Natives, as citizens, and as shapers of the modern world and why this might be and what effects it might have. 

Photo credit: Jean-Luc Bertini

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Bestselling author David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota. He is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, two Minnesota Book Awards, and fellowships from the NEH, Bush Foundation, and the Guggenheim Foundation. His book, The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee was a 2019 finalist for both the National Book Award and Carnegie Medal. He divides his time between his home on the Leech Lake Reservation and Los Angeles, where he is a professor of English at USC.

The son of Robert Treuer, an Austrian Jew and Holocaust survivor and Margaret Seelye Treuer, a tribal court judge, David Treuer grew up on Leech Lake Reservation. After graduating from high school he attended Princeton University where he wrote two senior theses—one in anthropology and one in creative writing—and where he worked with Toni Morrison, Paul Muldoon, and Joanna Scott. Treuer graduated in 1992 and published his first novel, Little, in 1995. He received his Ph.D. in anthropology and published his second novel, The Hiawatha, in 1999. His third novel The Translation of Dr Apelles and a book of criticism, Native American Fiction: A User's Manual appeared in 2006. The Translation of Dr Apelles was named a Best Book of the Year by the Washington Post, Time Out, and City Pages. He published his first major work of nonfiction, Rez Life, in 2012. His next novel, Prudence, was published by Riverhead Books in 2015. His essays and stories have appeared in Granta, Harper’s, Esquire, TriQuarterly, The Washington Post, Lucky Peach, The New York Times, The LA Times, Orion, and Slate.com.

 
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Thu, March 31, 2022
Lunch Program
Alison Harris

From selecting a snack to considering a monetary bargain, choices are a defining feature of our lives. A cognitive neuroscientist, Alison Harris, the Ostby-Cook Associate Professor of Psychology and George R. Roberts Fellow at CMC, will discuss how cognitive neuroscience research using electroencephalography (EEG) can track how decisions unfold in the brain across the time course of choice, including how we represent value, weight choice-relevant attributes, and incorporate context-dependent goals.

Professor Harris's Athenaeum presentation celebrates her installation ceremony as the Ostby-Cook Associate Professor of Psychology at Claremont McKenna College.

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Alison Harris is the Ostby-Cook Associate Professor of Psychology and George R. Roberts Fellow at CMC. As a cognitive neuroscientist, she is interested how brain activity gives rise to complex cognitive behaviors. Her research uses electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERP), along with measures of behavior, to track the timing and dynamics of visual perception and decision making. Combining neurophysiological approaches with advanced statistical and modeling techniques, she has explored how decision making is affected by the interplay of preferences with contextual goals such as losing weight, minimizing physical effort, or choosing for a friend. Her publications have appeared in journals including The Journal of Neuroscience, Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, and Psychological Science. With support from the National Science Foundation, she has trained students in EEG/ERP data collection and analysis in preparation for future careers in medical and research fields.

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Mon, April 4, 2022 - Tue, April 5, 2022
Dinner Program
Under the Lights Cast, Crew, Directors, and Writers

Under The Lights is back in the Ath this spring with three student-directed (and even one student-written) short plays about love, lust, and unconventional relationships. From awkward breakups, to alien encounters, to an insect-prompted parental breakdown, marriages will be tested, secrets revealed, and lots of laughs will be had.

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Kingdom of the Spider—The story of a sleep-deprived parent, a seductive black widow spider, and a surprise religious encounter, all on one man’s front porch.

Director:
Lucia Stein SC ‘23

Cast:
Nandini Mittal CMC ‘22
Tiffany Teng CMC ‘21
Anna Portland Tolkien CMC ‘24

 
Worst Breakups of All Time—From the Civil War to a smattering of modern-day breakups in a comedy that proves that no matter how hard someone has stomped on your heart...it could always be worse.

Director:
Alessia Zanobini CMC ‘23

Cast:
Elise Thuresson CMC ‘24
Sara Habaibeh CMC ‘25
Anna Tolkien CMC ‘24
Charlene Baghdadi CMC ‘25
Jeffrey Pendo PO ‘24
Paayal Maheshwari PO ‘25


Evan and the Aliens—George and Bernadette are a married alien couple visiting Earth who's endless fighting gets them stuck in the middle of nowhere. They pick up a human named Evan, who has a few problems of his own, who teaches them to love each other. Written and Directed by Lily Wellington, PZ '24

Director:
Lily Wellington PZ ‘24

Cast:
Nishka Ayyar CMC ‘23
Diya Courty-Stephens CMC ‘23
Jeffrey Pendo PO ‘24


 

 

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Wed, April 6, 2022
Dinner Program
Jennifer Weiss-Wolf

After centuries of being shrouded in taboo and superstition, periods have gone mainstream. Seemingly overnight, a new, high-profile movement has emerged—one dedicated to bold activism, creative product innovation, and smart policy advocacy—to address the centrality of menstruation in relation to core issues of gender equality and equity. Jennifer Weiss-Wolf, attorney and author, explores why periods have become a prominent political cause impacting societal attitudes throughout history—in the United States and around the world— inspiring grassroots activism and product innovation. In her book, Periods Gone Public: Taking a Stand for Menstrual Equity, Weiss-Wolf challenges readers to face this stigma head-on and to elevate an agenda that recognizes both the power—and the absolute normalcy—of menstruation.
 

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A frequent writer and advocate on issues of gender and politics in America, Jennifer Weiss-Wolf was dubbed the “architect of the U.S. campaign to squash the tampon tax” by Newsweek. She currently serves as the inaugural women and democracy fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU Law and in 2022 she joined Ms.—the feminist movement-making magazine—where she serves as executive director for partnerships and strategy. Weiss-Wolf is on the board of the Feminist Press and the editorial board of the Fund for Women’s Equality “Equal Voice, Equal Future” initiative. In 2015, Weiss-Wolf conceptualized and co-edited a volume of Legal Change: Lessons from America’s Social Movements. Her book, Periods Gone Public: Taking a Stand for Menstrual Equity (Arcade 2017), earned starred reviews by Publishers Weekly and Library Journal, and The Washington Post called it “a riveting read . . . a promising call to smart activism.” 

 In 2021, Weiss-Wolf organized the Brennan Center series, “Abortion is Essential to Democracy.” Her forthcoming book, Period. Full Stop. The Politics of Menopause, will be published by NYU Press in 2024. In addition to her books, Weiss-Wolf’s writing has also been published in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, TIME, Newsweek, Cosmopolitan, Teen Vogue, Marie Claire, Glamour, Harper’s Bazaar, and NPR, among others. She holds a JD from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, where she was editor in chief of the Cardozo Women’s Law Journal. 

Ms. Weiss-Wolf’s Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Mgrublian Center for Human Rights at Claremont McKenna College. 

View Video : YouTube with Jennifer Weiss-Wolf

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Mon, April 11, 2022
Dinner Program
Agus Sudjianto

Mathematical models play a very prominent role in financial institutions for decision making. The use of models including Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) carry both financial and non-financial risks. Having learned from past financial crisis experiences, banks now practice model risk management, a discipline and a process to ensure that models are developed and used responsibly including from an ethical and legal point of view. Agus Sudjianto, executive vice president, head of Model Risk, and a member of the management committee at Wells Fargo, will explore how and why responsible AI is critical in finance. 

 

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Agus Sudjianto is an executive vice president, head of Model Risk and a member of Management Committee at Wells Fargo, where he is responsible for enterprise model risk management. 

Prior to his current position, Sudjianto was the modeling and analytics director and chief model risk officer at Lloyds Banking Group in the United Kingdom. Before joining Lloyds, he was an executive and head of Quantitative Risk at Bank of America. 

Prior to his career in banking, he was a product design manager in the Powertrain Division of Ford Motor Company. 

Sudjianto holds several U.S. patents in both finance and engineering. He has published numerous technical papers and is a co-author of Design and Modeling for Computer Experiments. His technical expertise and interests include quantitative risk, particularly credit risk modeling, machine learning and computational statistics. 

He holds masters and doctorate degrees in engineering and management from Wayne State University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Tue, April 12, 2022
Lunch Program
Nicole Appleton '14, Sarah Baker '17, and Yao Li '20, panelists; Heather Antecol, moderator

Join Heather Antecol, Dean of the Faculty and Boswell Professor of Economics at CMC, and three Lowe Institute alumnae (Nicole Appleton ’14, Sarah Baker '17, and Yao Li ’20) as they recount how they turned their post-graduate career aspirations into successful and varied paths, and ways in which current students—or anyone—may craft their own journeys. 

This panel discussion is co-sponsored by the Lowe Institute of Political Economy at CMC.

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Nicole Appleton '14 is a former management consultant turned startup employee. She loves using a combo of data science + real world consumer insights (art + science) to noodle on ambiguous business questions. Right now she's helping a 20-person molecular beverage printing startup come out of stealth and hit the markets.

Sarah Baker '14 is a third year economics doctoral student at the University of California, Berkeley. After graduating from Claremont McKenna, she worked at the Federal Reserve Board of Governors for two years before attending graduate school on an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

Yao Li '20 studied math at CMC and is now a doctoral student in operations management at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management.

This panel discussion is co-sponsored by the Lowe Institute of Political Economy at CMC.

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Tue, April 12, 2022
Dinner Program
Anita Hill

Anita Hill’s most recent book, Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence, is a new manifesto about the origins and course of gender violence in our society; a combination of memoir, personal accounts, law, and social analysis, and a call to action from one of our nation's most prominent advocate for equality and civil rights.

Professor Hill's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Open Academy at CMC.

Photo credit: Celeste Sloman

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The youngest of 13 children from a farm in rural Oklahoma, Anita Hill received her J.D. from Yale Law School in 1980. She began her career in private practice in Washington, D.C. Before becoming a law professor, she worked at the U. S. Education Department and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. In 1989, Hill became the first African American to be tenured at the University of Oklahoma, College of Law, where she taught contracts and commercial law. She has made presentations to hundreds of business, professional, academic and civic organizations in the United States and abroad. As counsel to Cohen Milstein, Hill advises on class action workplace discrimination cases. 

Hill's previous book is Reimagining Equality: Stories of Gender, Race and Finding Home. She has also written an autobiography, Speaking Truth to Power. With Professor Emma Coleman Jordan she co-edited, Race, Gender and Power in America: The Legacy of the Hill-Thomas Hearings

Hill’s commentary has been published in TIME, Newsweek, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, and Ms. Magazine. She has appeared on national television programs including Good Morning America, Meet the Press, The Today Show, The Tavis Smiley Show and Larry King Live

She has received numerous honorary degrees and civic awards. She has chaired the Human Rights Law Committee of the International Bar Association. In addition, she is on the Board of Governors of the Tufts Medical Center and the Board of Directors of the National Women’s Law Center and the Boston Area Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights. 

She currently serves as senior advisor to the provost at Brandeis University where is also a professor of law, public policy, and women's studies. 

Professor Hill's Athenaeum presentation is co-sponsored by the Open Academy at CMC.

Photo credit: Celeste Sloman

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Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum

Claremont McKenna College
385 E. Eighth Street
Claremont, CA 91711

Phone: (909) 607-8244
Email:

Contact

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Fax: (909) 621-8579
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