Appropriate Documentation

  1. In order to establish eligibility for accommodations you must provide documentation which identifies that you have a condition which substantially limits your performance in one or more major life activities. Claremont McKenna College utilizes the “Seven Essential Elements of Quality Documentation” as developed by AHEAD, the Association of Higher Education and Disability. Documentation that responds to these elements provides the Dean of Students Office with the information needed to establish eligibility for appropriate and reasonable accommodations. Click here to review AHEAD’s Seven Essential Elements of Quality Documentation.
  2. Supporting documentation should generally include the following:
    1. Verify the student's disability and give an explanation of its impact on one or more of the student's major life activities
    2. Include duration of treatment and evidence that previous treatment plans have been ineffective
    3. Explains previously used interventions. Include why they are or are not currently being requested
    4. Describes and affirms how the accommodations requested alleviate the identified symptoms of the disability or serves a defined role in treatment
    5. Affirms that having the Accommodation is necessary for the student to have equitable access to the full CMC student experience.
    6. Includes the name, license number, contact information, address, signature, and date of documentation from the licensed professional.
  3. Documentation Guidelines
    1. Should not be provided by someone who is related to the student, even if an appropriately licensed professional.
    2. Be current (Testing and evaluation should have been conducted within the past three years for learning disabilities and ADHD or ADD and within the last 6 months to a year for physical and mental health related disabilities.) In some cases, older documentation may be accepted if you have been evaluated as an adult. If the documentation the student submits does not support a a current need for accommodations and/or is out of date, the student will be promptly notified that they can receive new documentation and move through the rest of the request process.
    3. If you are asked to submit updated documentation, it will be processed when it is received. Failure to provide updated documentation in a timely manner can limit or delay your access to accommodations. Updated documentation should conform to the same elements required for your original documentation; a simple letter confirming ongoing treatment is not sufficient.
  4. Specific Documentation Information for Learning Disabilities including ADD/ADHD:
    1. There are many different types of learning disabilities. Your documentation must provide clear and specific evidence and identification of a learning disability. Terms such as learning difficulties or learning differences are not equivalent to a diagnosis of a disability. It is preferred that a DSM-IV diagnosis and code be included. Generally, documentation for a learning disability and/or ADD/ADHD should include the following:
      1. The length of time the diagnostician has treated you and date of last contact.
      2. A diagnosis.
      3. A summary of assessment procedures and evaluation instruments used to make the diagnosis.
      4. The results of the evaluation instruments used. Generally, the following tests are recommended: a full, adult-normed aptitude test, an information processing test, and an achievement test assessing current functioning in reading, math, and written language.
      5. A description of the expected progression or stability of the disability.
      6. A description of current and past accommodations, services and/or medications.
      7. Recommendations for accommodations in the post-secondary educational environment.
  5. Specific Documentation Information for Psychological or Psychiatric Disabilities should include the following:
    1. The length of time the diagnostician has treated you and the date of last contact.
    2. A clear diagnostic statement describing the disability.
    3. A description of the diagnostic methodology used, including a description of the diagnostic criteria, evaluation methods, procedures, tests and dates of administration, as well as a clinical narrative, observation, and specific results.
    4. A description of the current functional limitations resulting from the disability.
    5. A description of the expected progression or stability of the disability.
    6. A description of current and past accommodations, services and/or medications.
    7. Recommendations for accommodations in the post-secondary educational environment.