Faculty

Mark Huber

Across the CMC curriculum, members of our faculty are meeting the challenge of these unprecedented and historic times, delivering exceptional coursework in a fully online modality for the fall semester. In our Academic Innovations series of faculty Q&As, professors share their curricular highlights, best practices, and how students are helping to shape virtual learning for a memorable, collaborative academic experience.

Rima Basu

Across the CMC curriculum, members of our faculty are meeting the challenge of these unprecedented and historic times, delivering exceptional coursework in a fully online modality for the fall semester. In our Academic Innovations series of faculty Q&As, professors share their curricular highlights, best practices, and how students are helping to shape virtual learning for a memorable, collaborative academic experience.

David-Bjerk

Across the CMC curriculum, members of our faculty are meeting the challenge of these unprecedented and historic times, delivering exceptional coursework in a fully online modality for the fall semester. In our Academic Innovations series of faculty Q&As, professors share their curricular highlights, best practices, and how students are helping to shape virtual learning for a memorable, collaborative academic experience.

vossmeyer

Across the CMC curriculum, members of our faculty are meeting the challenge of these unprecedented and historic times, delivering exceptional coursework in a fully online modality for the fall semester. In our Academic Innovations series of faculty Q&As, professors share their curricular highlights, best practices, and how students are helping to shape virtual learning for a memorable, collaborative academic experience.

captapult

Across the CMC curriculum, members of our faculty are meeting the challenge of these unprecedented and historic times, delivering exceptional coursework in a fully online modality for the fall semester. In our Academic Innovations series of faculty Q&As, professors share their curricular highlights, best practices, and how students are helping to shape virtual learning for a memorable, collaborative academic experience.

sam-nelson

Across the CMC curriculum, members of our faculty are meeting the challenge of these unprecedented and historic times, delivering exceptional coursework in a fully online modality for the fall semester. In our Academic Innovations series of faculty Q&As, professors share their curricular highlights, best practices, and how students are helping to shape virtual learning for a memorable, collaborative academic experience.

derik-smith

The 2019-20 faculty awards honored five CMC professors, recognizing their impactful scholarship, inspiring dedication to service, and remarkable teaching.

“These members of our faculty embody the ideals of a CMC professor,” said Peter Uvin, vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty. “Each one balances a commitment to teaching with their own research and with working together to make CMC a better place.”

Stacey N. Doan

Claremont McKenna College has received a RAPID grant from the National Science Foundation to study the effects of the coronavirus pandemic on families with young children. The project, which places CMC at the forefront of COVID-19 related research, will investigate how the current health crisis changes stress responses in adults and children and identify factors that might predict resilience and risk taking in individuals.

Professor Jack Pitney in the classroom

Can Donald Trump cancel the November election?

That was the intriguing question asked-and-answered by Claremont McKenna College presidential campaign expert John J. Pitney Jr. in a remote lecture held last Thursday, with 200 curious alumni and parents in virtual attendance.

Pitney, who is the Roy P. Crocker Professor of American Politics, gave an unequivocal “no.”

Earlier this month, Tamara Venit-Shelton wrote an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times about racial profiling related to the coronavirus outbreak. Of the recent panic, Venit-Shelton said, “medical scapegoating and discriminatory policing of Asian-owned businesses and homes were routine in the 19th century. Unfortunately, it is all too easy for these attitudes to be reawakened, particularly during health crises.” Read her full piece here.

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