Economics

Portrait of John Snider ’77

Looking at him now, you’d think John Snider ’77 was born to handle large sums of money. After all, the focused equities fund he co-managed for the TCW Group ballooned from $700 million to nearly $9 billion on his watch. Before his 2018 retirement, Snider was a group managing director and senior portfolio manager for nearly 20 years with the investment firm founded by CMC board chair emeritus Robert A. Day ’65 P’12.

But nothing in Snider’s childhood prepared him for any of that. 

Portrait of Heather Antecol on campus

Prof. Heather Antecol, a distinguished economics scholar whose influential research on labor economics is recognized on a global scale, has been named Claremont McKenna College’s new Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty.

Antecol, the Boswell Professor of Economics, is the former chair of the Robert Day School of Economics and Finance, former director of the Berger Institute, and the most recent chair of the college’s Administration Committee.

She began her new role this past Monday, February 22.

Professors Zach Courser '99 and Eric Hellan stand with their Policy Lab research team

Across the CMC curriculum, members of our faculty are meeting the challenge of these unprecedented and historic times, delivering exceptional coursework in a fully online modality for the spring semester. In our Academic Innovations series of faculty Q&As, professors share their curricular highlights, best practices, and how students are helping to shape virtual learning for a memorable, collaborative academic experience.

Raj Chetty, the William A. Ackman Professor of Public Economics at Harvard University

As a child in India, Raj Chetty dreamed of coming to America, a place “where you could do anything.” He still believes that. But his Opportunity Atlas research also shows that the American Dream is far too elusive for many who grow up here, through no fault of their own except a geographical luck-of-the-draw that has prevented millions from accessing high opportunity resources.

David-Bjerk

Across the CMC curriculum, members of our faculty are meeting the challenge of these unprecedented and historic times, delivering exceptional coursework in a fully online modality for the fall semester. In our Academic Innovations series of faculty Q&As, professors share their curricular highlights, best practices, and how students are helping to shape virtual learning for a memorable, collaborative academic experience.

Ben Gillen with a CMC student

Ben Gillen had worked with the best and brightest at Caltech. CMC students raised the bar.

Fredrik Linder, Wylie Makovsky, Tyler Chen and Michelle Chamberlain

Three CMC students were named winners of the annual Harold T. Geneen Charitable Trust case competition and will share the $5,000 prize for future student opportunities.

Panel at conference

The real time feedback flashed on large screens inside Roberts Pavilion: “Housing and jobs are driving people out—to Seattle, to Denver, and around the country.” “The ‘American Dream’ is changing, people no longer have as strong a desire for the white picket fence.” “When people aren’t homeowners they are less emotionally and physically invested in their communities.”

Claremont McKenna College has updated the classification of its economics major to better reflect the quantitative and experimental nature of that field at the College.

The U.S. Dept. of Education’s Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) assigns codes to academic majors to accurately track and report fields of study at the nation’s colleges and universities.

CMC has updated its economics code from General Economics to Econometrics and Quantitative Economics.

Global trade illustration

By Sven W. Arndt
Charles M. Stone Professor of Money, Credit and Trade

The pros and cons of America’s international economic policies are receiving intense scrutiny from the new U.S. administration. Among the hot-button issues are free trade and tariff policy, exchange rate manipulation, preferential trade agreements and worker migration. How and to what extent these policies are changed will have important long-term implications on a number of economic, political, and strategic fronts.

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